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  1.  36
    Organizational Virtue Orientation and Family Firms.G. Tyge Payne, Keith H. Brigham, J. Christian Broberg, Todd W. Moss & Jeremy C. Short - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (2):257-285.
    This manuscript develops the concept of organizational virtue orientation (OVO) and examines differences between family and non-family firms on the six organizational virtue dimensions of Integrity, Empathy, Warmth, Courage, Conscientiousness, and Zeal. Using content analysis of shareholder letters from S&P 500 companies, our analyses find that there are significant differences between family and non-family firms in their espoused OVO, with family firms generally being higher. Specifically, family firms were significantly higher on the dimensions of Empathy, Warmth, and Zeal, but lower (...)
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  2.  8
    Organizational Virtue Orientation and Family Firms.G. Tyge Payne, Keith H. Brigham, J. Christian Broberg, Todd W. Moss & Jeremy C. Short - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (2):257.
    This manuscript develops the concept of organizational virtue orientation and examines differences between family and non-family firms on the six organizational virtue dimensions of Integrity, Empathy, Warmth, Courage, Conscientiousness, and Zeal. Using content analysis of shareholder letters from S&P 500 companies, our analyses find that there are significant differences between family and non-family firms in their espoused OVO, with family firms generally being higher. Specifically, family firms were significantly higher on the dimensions of Empathy, Warmth, and Zeal, but lower on (...)
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    An Empirical Examination of Firm, Industry, and Temporal Effects on Corporate Social Performance.G. Tomas M. Hult, Charles C. Snow, David J. Ketchen, Aaron F. McKenny & Jeremy C. Short - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (8):1122-1156.
    Research examining firm and industry effects on performance has primarily focused on the financial aspects of firm performance. Corporate social performance is a major aspect of firm performance that has been under-examined empirically in the literature to date. Adding to the fundamental debate regarding firm versus industry effects on performance, this study uses data drawn from the Kinder, Lydenberg and Domini Co. database to examine the degree to which CSP is related to firm, industry, and temporal factors. The results of (...)
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