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  1.  58
    To What Extent is Business Responding to Climate Change? Evidence From a Global Wine Producer.Jeremy Galbreath - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):421-432.
    Most studies on climate change response have examined reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Yet these studies do not take into account ecosystem services constraints and biophysical disruptions wrought by climate change that may require broader types of response. By studying a firm in the wine industry and using a research approach not constrained by structured methodologies or biased toward GHG emissions, the findings suggest that both “inside out” and “outside in” actions are taken in response to climate change. While (...)
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  2.  19
    The Drivers of Climate Change Innovations: Evidence From the Australian Wine Industry.Jeremy Galbreath, David Charles & Eddie Oczkowski - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (2):217-231.
    This study examined the drivers of climate change innovations and the effects of these innovations on firm outcomes in a sample of 203 firms in the South Australian wine cluster. The results of structural equation modeling analysis suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct effect on climate change innovations, and stimulates knowledge exchanges between firms in the cluster. KEs between firms in the cluster in turn directly affect the climate change innovations. The findings suggest a perhaps counterintuitive interrelationship between firm- (...)
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  3.  14
    Drivers of Green Innovations: The Impact of Export Intensity, Women Leaders, and Absorptive Capacity.Jeremy Galbreath - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (1):47-61.
    Little research has considered the potential influence of distant, external pressures on the implementation of firms’ ‘green’ innovations, nor how internal firm resources might moderate this relationship. By combining institutional and resource-based theories and examining 649 firms in Australia, I find that export intensity is positively associated with green innovations. Further, as women in leadership roles increase in firms, the relationship strengthens between export intensity and green innovations. The results also suggest that greater levels of absorptive capacity among firms strengthen (...)
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  4.  15
    When Do Board and Management Resources Complement Each Other? A Study of Effects on Corporate Social Responsibility.Jeremy Galbreath - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):281-292.
    Following resource-based and complementary asset perspectives, this paper examines the effects of board and management resources on corporate social responsibility in a sample of large Australian public firms. Specifically, this study posits that outside directors and women on boards are complementary in that their multiplicative effect incrementally influences CSR above their individual, independent effects. The hypothesis is confirmed. Further, the study tests the interactive effect of a senior CSR manager, determining the independent and complementary effects of managerial resources upon board (...)
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  5.  32
    Are Organisation Researchers Too Obsessed with the Economic Responsibility of the Firm?Jeremy Galbreath - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 65 (3):287-295.
    The original intent of business education in America focused on the development of professional managers who would look after the interests of society. As economic and shareholder theories influenced business education, firm performance became the manager’s top – if not only – priority. The economic responsibility of the firm also appears to be dominating scholarly interest in organisations as well. However, business firms constitute part of the fabric of society and closer attention should be paid by organisation researchers to the (...)
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  6. Knowledge and the Climate Change Issue: An Exploratory Study of Cluster and Extra-Cluster Effects.David des KlassCharles & Jeremy Galbreath - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):11-25.
    Climate change, while potentially impacting many industries, appears to have considerable significance to the wine industry. Yet little is known about how firms acquire knowledge and gain an understanding of climate change and its impacts. This study, exploratory in nature and studying firms from the wine-producing region of Tasmania, is one of the first in the management literature to use cluster theory to examine the climate change issue. Firms are predicted to exchange knowledge about climate change more readily with other (...)
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  7.  45
    ESG in Focus: The Australian Evidence.Jeremy Galbreath - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):529-541.
    Addressing ESG issues has become a point of interest for investors, shareholders, and governments as a risk management concern, while for firms it has become an emerging part of competitive strategy. In this study, a database from an independent ratings agency is used to examine, longitudinally, how Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) 300 firms are responding to ESG issues. Following institutional theory predictions, ASX300 firms are improving ESG performance over the 2002–2009 timeframe. Furthermore, over this timeframe, performance on the governance dimension (...)
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  8.  7
    Is Board Gender Diversity Linked to Financial Performance? The Mediating Mechanism of CSR.Jeremy Galbreath - 2018 - Business and Society 57 (5):863-889.
    The evidence for a positive, direct link between the representation of women on boards of directors and financial performance is tenuous. Given the importance of the gender diversity–financial performance debate, researchers are left to examine how, if at all, the two are linked. The present study takes the position that the link is indirect. Specifically, following stakeholder theory, an argument is made that women on boards’ attunement to stakeholder interests leads them to influence firms’ prosocial actions, which results in higher (...)
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  9.  14
    Knowledge and the Climate Change Issue: An Exploratory Study of Cluster and Extra-Cluster Effects.Jeremy Galbreath, David Charles & Des Klass - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):11-25.
    Climate change, while potentially impacting many industries, appears to have considerable significance to the wine industry. Yet little is known about how firms acquire knowledge and gain an understanding of climate change and its impacts. This study, exploratory in nature and studying firms from the wine-producing region of Tasmania, is one of the first in the management literature to use cluster theory to examine the climate change issue. Firms are predicted to exchange knowledge about climate change more readily with other (...)
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