5 found
Order:
  1.  12
    Art and Archaeology (O.) Palagia Ed. Greek Sculpture. Functions, Materials and Techniques in the Archaic and Classical Periods. Cambridge UP, 2006. Pp. Xv + 326. £55. 9780521772679. [REVIEW]Jeremy Tanner - 2007 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:222-.
  2.  22
    Art and Archaeology (S.) Dillon Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture. Contexts, Subjects, and Styles. Cambridge UP, 2006. Pp. Xx + 217. £60. 9780521854986. [REVIEW]Jeremy Tanner - 2007 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:221-.
  3.  60
    Ancient Greece, Early China: Sino-Hellenic Studies and Comparative Approaches to the Classical World. A Review Article.Jeremy Tanner - 2009 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:89-.
    Classicists have long been wary of comparisons, partly for ideological reasons related to the incomparability of ‘the Classical’, partly because of the often problematic basis and limited illumination afforded by such efforts as have been made: the -reception of the work of the Cambridge ritualists — such as J.G. Frazer and Jane Harrison — is a case in point in both respects. Interestingly, even the specifically comparative interests of the much more rigorous projects of the Paris School, at the Centre (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  4
    (H.) Bumke Statuarische Gruppen in der frühen griechischen Kunst. (Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Ergänzungsheft 32). Berlin and New York: De Gruyter, 2004. Pp. vi + 204, illus. €74. 3110181797. [REVIEW]Jeremy Tanner - 2006 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:195-196.
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  12
    Sino-Hellenic Studies and Comparative Approaches to the Classical World: Ancient Greece, Early China: A Review Article.Jeremy Tanner - 2009 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:89-109.
    Classicists have long been wary of comparisons, partly for ideological reasons related to the incomparability of ‘the Classical’, partly because of the often problematic basis and limited illumination afforded by such efforts as have been made: the -reception of the work of the Cambridge ritualists — such as J.G. Frazer and Jane Harrison — is a case in point in both respects. Interestingly, even the specifically comparative interests of the much more rigorous projects of the Paris School, at the Centre (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark