15 found
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  1.  9
    Lay Observers, Telegraph Lines, and Kansas Weather: The Field Network as a Mode of Knowledge Production.Jeremy Vetter - 2011 - Science in Context 24 (2):259-280.
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  2.  9
    Introduction: Lay Participation in the History of Scientific Observation.Jeremy Vetter - 2011 - Science in Context 24 (2):127-141.
  3.  15
    Labs in the Field? Rocky Mountain Biological Stations in the Early Twentieth Century.Jeremy Vetter - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (4):587 - 611.
    Biological field stations proliferated in the Rocky Mountains region of the western United States during the early decades of the twentieth century. This essay examines these Rocky Mountain field stations as hybrid lab-field sites from the perspective of the field side of the dichotomy: as field sites with raised walls rather than as laboratories whose walls with the natural world have been lowered. Not only were these field stations transformed to be more like laboratories, but they were also embedded within (...)
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  4.  10
    Science Along the Railroad: Expanding Field Work in the US Central West.Jeremy Vetter - 2004 - Annals of Science 61 (2):187-211.
    The building of the transcontinental railroad in the US Central West in the late 1860s greatly improved access to this region and led to the expansion of scientific field work. The relationships between science and the railroad spanned a diverse spectrum, ranging from its practical advantages to more complex interactions such as the transformation of nature along railway corridors and the reciprocal exchange of favours between scientists and railway companies. The dominance of science along the railroad in the second half (...)
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  5.  13
    Cowboys, Scientists, and Fossils.Jeremy Vetter - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):273-303.
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  6.  2
    Shared Ground: Between Environmental History and the History of Science.Mark D. Hersey & Jeremy Vetter - 2019 - History of Science 57 (4):403-440.
    Recent years have witnessed a significant expansion in the number of studies positioned at the intersection of the history of science and environmental history. Although these studies continue to navigate lingering methodological tensions, collectively they underscore the promise of a disciplinary cross-fertilization that proved largely latent for the first quarter century or more following environmental history’s emergence as a discrete discipline. This article situates this recent scholarship in the historiographical landscape from which it has emerged. To that end, it summarizes (...)
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  7.  2
    Science Along the Railroad: Expanding Field Work in the US Central West.Jeremy Vetter - 2004 - Annals of Science 61 (3):271-271.
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  8.  21
    Christopher F. Jones. Routes of Power: Energy and Modern America. 312 Pp., Illus., Maps, Bibl., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: Harvard University Press, 2014. $39.95. [REVIEW]Jeremy Vetter - 2016 - Isis 107 (1):197-198.
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  9.  6
    Experiential and Cosmopolitan Knowledge: The Transcontinental Field Practices of the U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey.Jeremy Vetter - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 70:18-27.
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  10.  13
    Marcus Hall. Earth Repair: A Transatlantic History of Environmental Restoration. Xvi + 310 Pp., Figs., Tables, App., Bibl., Index. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2005. $35 .Finis Dunaway. Natural Visions: The Power of Images in American Environmental Reform. Xxiv + 246 Pp., Figs., Apps., Index. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005. $37. [REVIEW]Jeremy Vetter - 2006 - Isis 97 (4):791-793.
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  11.  20
    Wallace’s Other Line: Human Biogeography and Field Practice in the Eastern Colonial Tropics. [REVIEW]Jeremy Vetter - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):89 - 123.
    This paper examines how the 19th-century British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace used biogeographical mapping practices to draw a boundary line between Malay and Papuan groups in the colonial East Indies in the 1850s. Instead of looking for a continuous gradient of variation between Malays and Papuans, Wallace chose to look for a sharp discontinuity between them. While Wallace's "human biogeography" paralleled his similar project to map plant and animal distributions in the same region, he invoked distinctive "mental and moral" features (...)
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  12.  6
    Paul D. Brinkman. The Second Jurassic Dinosaur Rush: Museums and Paleontology in America at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. Xiv + 345 Pp., Illus., App., Bibl., Index. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2010. $49 .Lowell Dingus;, Mark A. Norell. Barnum Brown: The Man Who Discovered Tyrannosaurus Rex. Xiv + 368 Pp., Illus., Table, Apps., Bibl., Index. Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2010. £20.95, $29.95. [REVIEW]Jeremy Vetter - 2011 - Isis 102 (4):771-772.
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  13.  4
    Wallace’s Other Line: Human Biogeography and Field Practice in the Eastern Colonial Tropics.Jeremy Vetter - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):89-123.
    This paper examines how the 19th-century British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace used biogeographical mapping practices to draw a boundary line between Malay and Papuan groups in the colonial East Indies in the 1850s. Instead of looking for a continuous gradient of variation between Malays and Papuans, Wallace chose to look for a sharp discontinuity between them. While Wallace's "human biogeography" paralleled his similar project to map plant and animal distributions in the same region, he invoked distinctive "mental and moral" features (...)
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  14. Explaining Structural Constraints on Lay Participation in Field Science.Jeremy Vetter - 2019 - Isis 110 (2):325-327.
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  15. Regionalizing Knowledge: The Ecological Approach of the USDA Office of Dryland Agriculture on the Great Plains.Jeremy Vetter - 2015 - In Sharon Kingsland & Denise Phillips (eds.), New Perspectives on the History of Life Sciences and Agriculture. Springer Verlag.
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