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  1.  46
    Unilateral Forgiveness and the Task of Reconciliation.Jeremy Watkins - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (1):19-42.
    Although forgiveness is often taken to bear a close connection to the value of reconciliation, there is a good deal of scepticism about its role in situations where there is no consensus on the moral complexion of the past and no admission of guilt on the part of the perpetrator. This scepticism is typically rooted in the claims that forgiveness without perpetrator acknowledgement aggravates the risk of recidivism; yields a substandard and morally compromised form of political accommodation; and comes across (...)
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  2. International Responsibility.James Crawford & Jeremy Watkins - 2010 - In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press.
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  3.  53
    Forgiveness and its Place in Ethics.Jeremy Watkins - 2005 - Theoria 71 (1):59-77.
    A number of philosophers have suggested that acts of forgiveness are pointless if the wrongdoer has atoned for his offence (since there is nothing to be forgiven) and unjustified if no atonement has been forthcoming (since there are no grounds for forgiveness). My aim in this paper is twofold. First, I try to remove this dilemma and show that forgiveness has a proper place in ethics by providing an account of its nature and justification. Second, I argue that the dilemma (...)
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  4.  18
    Matching Well-Being to Merit: The Example of Punishment.Jeremy Watkins, Basil Smith, Christopher Martin, Renate Pilapil & Hanno Sauer - 2011 - Ethical Perspectives 18 (1):5-27.
    In this paper, I explore our common-sense thinking about the relation between moral value, moral merit, and well-being. Starting from Ross’s observation that welfarist axiologies ignore our intuitions about desert, I focus on axiologies that take moral merit and well-being to be independent determinants of value. I distinguish three ways in which these axiologies can be formulated, and I then consider their application to the issue of punishment. The objection that they recommend penalties in circumstances in which intuitively we would (...)
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  5.  6
    Responsibility in Context.Jeremy Watkins - 2006 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (3):593-608.
  6.  9
    Christopher Martin is a Researcher in the Faculty of Medicine and a Lecturer in the Faculty of Education at Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. A Former School Principal, His Central Area of Research is Moral Philosophy and the Ethical and Political Foundations of Education. Email: Chris. [email protected] Med. Mun. Ca. [REVIEW]Hanno Sauer, Basil Smith & Jeremy Watkins - 2011 - Ethical Perspectives 18 (1):163.
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  7.  8
    Dworkin and His Critics. [REVIEW]Jeremy Watkins - 2006 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):110-112.
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  8.  10
    Matching Well-Being to Merit:The Example of Punishment.Jeremy Watkins - unknown
    In this paper, I explore our common-sense thinking about the relation between moral value, moral merit, and well-being. Starting from Ross’s observation that welfarist axiologies ignore our intuitions about desert, I focus on axiologies that take moral merit and well-being to be independent determinants of value. I distinguish three ways in which these axiologies can be formulated, and I then consider their application to the issue of punishment. The objection that they recommend penalties in circumstances in which intuitively we would (...)
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