19 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Jerome H. Barkow [16]Jerome Barkow [2]JeromeH Barkow [1]
  1.  79
    Jerome Barkow, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby (eds.) (1992). The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture. Oxford University Press.
    Second, this collection of cognitive programs evolved in the Pleistocene to solve the adaptive problems regularly faced by our hunter-gatherer ancestors-...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   398 citations  
  2.  3
    Jerome H. Barkow (1977). Conformity to Ethos and Reproductive Success in Two Hausa Communities: An Empirical Evaluation. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 5 (4):409-425.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   63 citations  
  3. Jerome H. Barkow (1992). Leda Cosmoides, and John Tooby, Eds. In Jerome Barkow, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby (eds.), The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  4.  6
    Jerome H. Barkow (1986). Central Problems of Sociobiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):188.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  5.  8
    Jerome H. Barkow (1991). Précis of Darwin, Sex and Status: Biological Approaches to Mind and Culture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):295-301.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6. Leda Cosmides, John Tooby & Jerome H. Barkow (1992). Introduction: Evolutionary Psychology and Conceptual Integration. In Jerome Barkow, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby (eds.), The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture. Oxford University Press. pp. 3--15.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  7.  41
    Jerome Barkow (2003). Biology is Destiny Only If We Ignore It. World Futures 59 (3 & 4):173 – 188.
    Problems of sustainability and survivability are best met not with moralizing but with policies that take advantage of our increasingly understood evolved human psychology. This knowledge helps us understand why our problems recur, and why we need not expect them to have permanent solutions. What is needed is an evolutionary praxis. It is possible, for example, to create policies that work around our tendencies to hierarchize and to form into ethnocentric and mutually hostile groups. Although in many ways there may (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  14
    Jerome H. Barkow (2002). Human Nature in Mind. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (6):270.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  21
    Jerome H. Barkow (2000). Our Shared Species-Typical Evolutionary Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):148-148.
    Because human cultures are far more similar than they are different, culturally constituted niches may work to limit or prevent the development of genetically based psychological differences across populations. The niche approach further implies that we may remain relatively well-adapted to contemporary environments because of the latter's cultural niche continuity with ancient environments.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  5
    Jerome H. Barkow (1981). The Logical Relation Between Cultural and Biological Evolution: On to the Next Question. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):235-236.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  14
    Jerome H. Barkow (2001). Culture and Hyperculture: Why Can't a Cetacean Be More Like a (Hu)Man? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):324-325.
    Human hyperculture appears to have been produced by the amplification of the kind of normal culture shared by cetaceans and other animals and presumably by our ancestors. Is there any possibility that cetaceans could be subject to these amplifying processes, which may include: sexual selection; within-group moral behavior; culling of low- cultural-capacity individuals through predation or self-predation; and reciprocal positive feedback between culture and the capacity for culture.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  3
    Jerome H. Barkow (1991). Joinings, Discontinuities and Details: Darwin, Sex and Status Revisited. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):320-334.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  3
    Jerome H. Barkow (1991). Evolved Self-Interest and the Cross-Cultural Survey. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):261-263.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  2
    Jerome H. Barkow (1979). Human Ethology: Empirical Wealth, Theoretical Dearth. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):27.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  1
    Jerome H. Barkow (1984). Of False Dichotomies and Larger Frames. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):680.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  1
    JeromeH Barkow (1974). Evaluation of Character and Social Control Among the Hausa. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 2 (1):1-14.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Jerome H. Barkow (1977). Conformity to Ethos and Reproductive Success in Two Hausa Communities: An Empirical Evaluation. Ethos 5 (4):409-425.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Jerome H. Barkow (1974). Evaluation of Character and Social Control Among the Hausa. Ethos 2 (1):1-14.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Jerome H. Barkow, Nurpudji Astuti Taslilm, Veni Hadju, Elly Ishak, Faisal Attamimi, Sani Silwana, Djunaidi M. Dachlan & A. Yahya (2001). Social Competition, Social Intelligence, and Why the Bugis Know More About Cooking Than About Nutrition. Proceedings of the British Academy 110:119-147.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography