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Jerry Goodstein [14]Jerry D. Goodstein [2]
  1.  18
    Individual and Organizational Reintegration After Ethical and Legal Transgressions in Advance.Jerry Goodstein, Ken Butterfield, Mike Pfarrer & Andy Wicks - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3).
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  2.  13
    Guest Editors’ Introduction Individual and Organizational Reintegration After Ethical or Legal Transgressions: Challenges and Opportunities.Jerry Goodstein, Kenneth D. Butterfield, Michael D. Pfarrer & Andrew C. Wicks - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):315-342.
    In this article we set the context for this special issue focusing on individual and organizational reintegration in the aftermath of transgressions that violate ethical and legal boundaries. Following a brief introduction to the topic we provide an overview of each of the four articles selected for this special issue. We then present a number of potentially fruitful empirical, theoretical, and normative directions management and ethics scholars might pursue in order to further advance this evolving literature.
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  3.  13
    Moral Repair in the Workplace: A Qualitative Investigation and Inductive Model.Jerry Goodstein, Ken Butterfield & Nathan Neale - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (1):17-37.
    The topic of moral repair in the aftermath of breaches of trust and harmdoing has grown in importance within the past few years. In this paper, we present the results of a qualitative study that offers insight into a series of key issues related to offender efforts to repair interpersonal harm in the workplace: What factors motivate offenders to make amends with those they have harmed? In what ways do offenders attempt to make amends? What outcomes emerge from attempts to (...)
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  4.  92
    Moral Compromise and Personal Integrity: Exploring the Ethical Issues of Deciding Together in Organizations.Jerry D. Goodstein - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (4):805-819.
    In this paper I explore the topic of moral compromise in institutional settings and highlight how moral compromise may affirm,rather than undermine, personal integrity. Central to this relationship between moral compromise and integrity is a view of the self that is responsive to multiple commitments and grounded in an ethic of responsibility. I elaborate a number of virtues that are related to thisnotion of the self and highlight how these virtues may support the development of individuals who are responsive and (...)
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  5.  41
    Giving Voice to Values, by Mary C. Gentile.Jerry Goodstein - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):451-455.
    Giving Voice To Values serves as a framework to teach individuals methods to speak up when they witness actions that are contrary to their professional and personal values. This essay illustrates how GVV serves as a catalyst to advance both research and teaching activities.
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  6.  16
    Fulfilling Institutional Responsibilities in Health Care: Organizational Ethics and the Role of Mission Discernment.Jerry Goodstein - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):433-450.
    In this paper we highlight the emergence of organizational ethics issues in health care as an important outcome of the changingstructure of health care delivery. We emphasize three core themes related to business ethics and health care ethics: integrity, responsibility, and choice. These themes are brought together in a discussion of the process of Mission Discernment as it has been developed and implemented within an integrated health care system. Through this discussion we highlight how processes of institutional reflection, such as (...)
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  7.  27
    Fulfilling Institutional Responsibilities in Health Care: Organizational Ethics and the Role of Mission Discernment.John A. Gallagher & Jerry Goodstein - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):433-450.
    Abstract: In this paper we highlight the emergence of organizational ethics issues in health care as an important outcome of the changing structure of health care delivery. We emphasize three core themes related to business ethics and health care ethics: integrity, responsibility, and choice. These themes are brought together in a discussion of the process of Mission Discernment as it has been developed and implemented within an integrated health care system. Through this discussion we highlight how processes of institutional reflection, (...)
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  8.  6
    Firms, Ex-Offenders, and Communities: A Stakeholder Capability Enhancement Perspective.Jerry Goodstein - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (4):491-518.
    ABSTRACT:This article contributes to the business ethics literature by applying and extending an emerging theoretical perspective—stakeholder capability enhancement —to previously unexplored areas of business ethics inquiry related to work, dignity, and relationships between firms, ex-offenders, and other stakeholders. In particular, I direct attention to ex-offenders as critical community-based stakeholders pursuing employment opportunities with employers in these communities. I discuss how prevailing hiring practices in firms restrict opportunities for ex-offenders to obtain meaningful work and undermine stakeholder capabilities and dignity. I consider (...)
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  9.  28
    Beyond Financial Incentives: Organizational Ethics and Organizational Integrity. [REVIEW]Jerry Goodstein & RobertLyman Potter - 1999 - HEC Forum 11 (4):293-305.
  10.  13
    A Breed Apart? Security Analysts and Herding Behavior.Jane Cote & Jerry Goodstein - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 18 (3):305 - 314.
    Herding behavior occurs when security analysts ignore their private opinions and issue public forecasts that mimic the earnings forecasts of others. Joining the consensus provides cover for analysts' reputations. We question the ethics of this practice when the motive to protect one's reputation takes precedence over the forecase accuracy motive. While seemingly predictable behavior from a self interested perspective, herding behavior has subtle but long term ramifications for the efficient pricing of securities and the preservation of the public trust in (...)
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  11.  5
    Managers’ Restorative Versus Punitive Responses to Employee Wrongdoing: A Qualitative Investigation.Nathan Robert Neale, Kenneth D. Butterfield, Jerry Goodstein & Thomas M. Tripp - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.
    A growing body of literature has examined managers’ use of restorative practices in the workplace. However, little is currently known about why managers use restorative practices as opposed to alternative responses. We employed a qualitative interview technique to develop an inductive model of managers’ restorative versus punitive response in the context of employee wrongdoing. The findings reveal a set of key motivating and moderating influences on the manager’s decision to respond to wrongdoing in a restorative versus punitive manner. The findings (...)
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  12.  1
    Response to Richard Marens.Jerry Goodstein & Andrew Wicks - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (3):431-432.
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  13.  60
    Corporate and Stakeholder Responsibility: Making Business Ethics a Two-Way Conversation.Jerry D. Goodstein & Andrew C. Wicks - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):375-398.
    In this article we revisit the notion of stakeholder responsibility as a way to highlight the role that stakeholders have in creating anethical business context. We argue for modifying the prevailing focus on corporate responsibility to stakeholders, and giving more serious attention to the importance of stakeholder responsibility—to firms, and to other stakeholders who are part of the collective enterprise. We elaborate why stakeholder responsibility matters, and suggest how making stakeholder responsibility a central focus of academics and practitioners can redefine (...)
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  14.  36
    Extending the Horizon of Business Ethics: Restorative Justice and the Aftermath of Unethical Behavior.Jerry Goodstein & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):453-480.
    We call for business ethics scholars to focus more attention on how individuals and organizations respond in the aftermath of unethical behavior. Insight into this issue is drawn from restorative justice, which moves beyond traditional approaches that emphasize retribution or rehabilitation to include restoring victims and other affected parties, reintegrating offenders, and facilitating moral repair in the workplace. We review relevant theoretical and empirical work in restorative justice and develop a conceptual model that highlights how this perspective can enhance theory (...)
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