19 found
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  1.  21
    Coping With Paradox Multistakeholder Learning Dialogue as a Pluralist Sensemaking Process for Addressing Messy Problems.Jerry M. Calton & Steven L. Payne - 2003 - Business and Society 42 (1):7-42.
    A notable feature of paradox is recognition that seemingly contradictory terms are inextricably intertwined and interrelated—holding out the hope that something new can be learned from the cognitive tension contained within. Aram has characterized the central concern of the business and society field as the paradox of interdependent relations. Our study argues that this and related paradoxes can be addressed by engaging with others and trying to gain shared insight via an interactive, developmental, exploratory sensemaking process that can inform the (...)
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  2.  18
    Building Partnerships to Create Social and Economic Value at the Base of the Global Development Pyramid.Jerry M. Calton, Patricia H. Werhane, Laura P. Hartman & David Bevan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):721-733.
    This paper builds on London and Hart’s critique that Prahalad’s best-selling book prompted a unilateral effort to find a fortune at the bottom of the pyramid. Prahalad’s instrumental, firm-centered construction suggests, perhaps unintentionally, a buccaneering style of business enterprise devoted to capturing markets rather than enabling new socially entrepreneurial ventures for those otherwise trapped in conditions of extreme poverty. London and Hart reframe Prahalad’s insight into direct global business enterprise toward “creating a fortune with the base of the pyramid” rather (...)
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  3. Stakeholder Learning Dialogues: How to Preserve Ethical Responsibility in Networks. [REVIEW]Anthony J. Daboub & Jerry M. Calton - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):85 - 98.
    The shift in corporate strategy, from vertical integration to strategic alliances, has developed hand in hand with the evolution of organizational structure, from the vertically integrated firm to the network organization. The result has been the elimination of boundaries, more flexible organizations, and a greater interaction among individuals and organizations. On the negative side, the specialization of firms on single areas of competence has resulted in the disaggregation of the value chain and in the disaggregation of ethical and legal responsibility. (...)
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  4.  36
    Social Contracting in a Pluralist Process of Moral Sense Making: A Dialogic Twist on the ISCT.Jerry M. Calton - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):329-346.
    This paper applies Wempe’s (2005, Business Ethics Quarterly 15(1), 113–135) boundary conditions that define the external and internal logics for contractarian business ethics theory, as a system of argumentation for evaluating current or prospective institutional arrangements for arriving at the “good life,” based on the principles and practices of social justice. It does so by showing that a more dynamic, process-oriented, and pluralist ‘dialogic twist’ to Donaldson and Dunfee’s (2003, ‘Social Contracts: sic et non’, in P. Heugens, H. van Oosterhout (...)
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  5.  22
    Exploring Research Potentials and Applications for Multi-Stakeholder Learning Dialogues.Stephen L. Payne & Jerry M. Calton - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (1):71-78.
    Varying conceptions of and purposes for dialogue exist. Recent dialogic theorists and advocates urge exploration of forms of dialogue for learning and applying relational responsibilities within stakeholder networks. A related phenomenon has been the recent emergence of multi-stakeholder dialogues that involve parties significantly affected by major issues or concerns, such as environmental sustainability, that have complex and wide-spread implications. The extent to which these recent multi-stakeholder dialogues assume anything resembling the relationship or caring and the learning potentials of dialogic goals (...)
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  6.  1
    Legitimizing Stakeholder Voice.Jerry M. Calton - 1996 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 7:1095-1106.
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  7.  20
    Business in Society at the Crossroad.Sandra Waddock, Shawn Berman, Jerry M. Calton, Dawn R. Elm, Colin Higgins & David Wasieleski - 2016 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 27:245-255.
    This workshop reflected on the current state of the Business and Society field and explored viable future directions for research in its related disciplines. The premise was that the field has reached a crossroads in its development, in accordance with the conference theme. To move forward, academic stakeholders should reassess the field’s identity and purpose to continue contributing meaningful work. The field could reframe itself as “Business in Society” to reflect the fact that organizations operate within a social and ecological (...)
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  8.  4
    If Pigs Could Talk.Jerry M. Calton - 2000 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 11:569-573.
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  9.  21
    Constructing a Student Honor Code From the Inside Out.Jerry M. Calton - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:370-375.
    This paper shows how a student honor code can be developed through a process of personal reflection and dialogic inquiry among students in a Business & Society class. This “inside out” learning process enables students to build an honor code organically by identifying shared core values that shape ethical practices, rather than through a top down intervention by faculty or administrators. The shared enterprise of crafting a student honor code becomes an exercise of moral imagination that promotes ethical development through (...)
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  10.  14
    What is at Stake in the Stakeholder Model?Jerry M. Calton - 1992 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 3:410-429.
  11.  20
    A De-Centered Stakeholder Network Path to Creating Mutual Value: Is Wal-Mart Showing the Way?Jerry M. Calton - 2013 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 24:200-207.
    This paper draws upon recent insights into the emergence of issue-focused stakeholder networks which engage in a co-creative process for constructing mutual value. It applies these insights to evaluate Wal-Mart CEO Lee Scott’s “21st Century Leadership” effort to impose an ethical supply chain control system in China. The paper concludes that further institutional innovation is needed to realize the potential of 21st century transformational leadership at Wal-Mart and elsewhere.
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  12.  1
    On the Positive Duty of Managers: Moral Agency in Community Conversations.Jerry M. Calton - 1997 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 8:547-558.
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  13.  12
    A Multi-Level Approach to Teaching Sustainability From the Inside Out.Jerry M. Calton - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:390-394.
    Teaching sustainability from the “inside-out” means starting at the level of individual students, progressing to organizational responsibilities, and lastly arriving at system-wide responsibilities.
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  14.  7
    Trust and Trust-Building Processes in Networks.Jerry M. Calton - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:225-236.
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  15.  4
    Reflections on Business in Society.Sandra Waddock, Dawn R. Elm, Jerry M. Calton, Dima Jamali, Colin Higgins & David Wasieleski - 2017 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 28:324-335.
    This workshop asked: How does business in society move beyond the ambition to develop excellent scholarship that helps make the world a better place to impact? The narrowness of current assessment criteria for ‘impact’ is becoming increasingly evident and criticized. Simultaneously, social media, blog outlets, easy-to-make and post videos and audios, and other means of communicating beyond scholarly audiences have become more prominent. We raised some of the following questions: How can and should, if at all, we as a field (...)
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  16.  6
    The Dark Side of Commitment.Jerry M. Calton - 1990 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 1:228-252.
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  17. Corporatism — Paradigm or Paradox?Jerry M. Calton - 1991 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 2:1219-1240.
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  18. Is There a Role for Multi-Stakeholder Learning Dialogues in Shaping Standards for Stakeholder Citizenship?Jerry M. Calton - 2002 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 13:167-170.
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  19. Who Owns the Knowledge Creation Processes of Learning Organizations?Jerry M. Calton - 1999 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 10:35-45.
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