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Jerry Williams [6]Jerry L. Williams [1]
  1.  63
    On Humans and Environment: The Role of Consciousness in Environmental Problems. [REVIEW]Jerry Williams & Shaun Parkman - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (4):449-460.
    This paper addresses the relationship between humans and nature as it relates to the ability of human societies to solve large-scale environmental problems. We assert that humans are not unique in their relationship with nature; all species have the ability to externalize their being into the world thus creating environmental problems. We also argue that human consciousness and rationality do not provide ready answers to these problems. Unless we better understand the pretheoretical and pragmatic nature of human consciousness, rational/scientific attempts (...)
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  2.  5
    Considering Finite Provinces of Meaning: The Problem of Communication in the Social Sciences.Jerry Williams - 2020 - Schutzian Research 12:155-170.
    This essay considers social science as a finite province of meaning. It is argued that teasing out common-sense meanings from social scientific conceptions is difficult because the meanings of scientific concepts are often veiled in life-worldly taken-for-grantedness. If social scientists have successfully created a scientific province of meaning, attempts to communicate findings outside of this reduced sphere of science should be somewhat problematic.
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  3.  13
    The Philosophical Anthropology of Heinrich Popitz.Jerry Williams - 2018 - Human Studies 41 (3):503-511.
    This analysis places the English translation of Heinrich Popitz’s Phenomena of Power: Authority, Domination, and Violence in the broader tradition of philosophical anthropology. It is argued anthropological arguments such as that offered by Popitz give insights not otherwise available to strict disciplinary inquiries. Poptiz’s discussion of power also suggests an important tension in philosophical anthropology. While Popitz contends power relations are “humanly produced realities” not “imposed by nature,” he nevertheless provides some support that physical and biological factors might contribute to (...)
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  4.  16
    The Poetry of John Dewey.Jerry L. Williams - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):50-63.
    “Poetry, art, religion are precious things.”The American philosopher John Dewey is an iconic figure. A prolific writer, his scholarly attention variously focused upon philosophy, education, democracy, economics, and aesthetics. It is not commonly known, however, that behind the scenes in his private office at Columbia University, Dewey also wrote poetry.2 Without his knowledge or consent, ninety-eight poems were collected from his wastebasket in 1930 by a custodian. Additional “scraps” and poems were found in his office desk after his retirement, bringing (...)
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  5.  9
    The Meaning Contexts of Poetry: A Schutzian Analysis.Jerry Williams - 2018 - Schutzian Research 10:221-238.
    In this essay, the meaning contexts of poetry are considered. It is argued that poetry represents a pairing of semantic meaning with that of music. The analysis first proceeds by exploring Alfred Schutz’s ideas about the constitution of meaning and the experience of music. Next, using these insights the essay turns to an analysis of my poem “Perspective” in order to investigate how poetry is composed and how it is experienced by a reader / listener.
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  6.  8
    Growing Old: On Becoming a Stranger.Jerry Williams - 2017 - Schutzian Research 9:13-28.
    This essay considers how normal aging might over the long run be thought of as undermining to “thinking as usual” in a society undergoing rapid social change. Informed by the phenomenology of Alfred Schutz, the criteria for thinking as usual are considered. Derived from his essay “The Stranger,” these criteria were developed by Schutz about the experience of an immigrant stranger approaching a new culture. Here it is argued that they might also help us better understand the experience of aging. (...)
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