Search results for 'Jesse Ramon Steinberg' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  35
    Jesse Ramon Steinberg (2008). God and the Possibility of Random Creation. Sophia 47 (2):193-199.
    In this paper I discuss a number of problems associated with the suggestion that it is possible for God to randomly select a possible world for actualization.
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  2. Jesse R. Steinberg & Alan M. Steinberg (2007). Disembodied Minds and the Problem of Identification and Individuation. Philosophia 35 (1):75-93.
    We consider and reject a variety of attempts to provide a ground for identifying and differentiating disembodied minds. Until such a ground is provided, we must withhold inclusion of disembodied minds from our picture of the world.
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  3.  5
    Jesse R. Steinberg & Alan M. Steinberg (forthcoming). A Multiply Qualified Conditional Analysis of Disposition Ascription: Mapping the Conceptual Topography of Ceteris Paribus. Erkenntnis:1-17.
    Given that an analysis of disposition ascription cannot be made in terms of a simple subjunctive conditional, we present a multiply qualified conditional analysis that places disposition ascription within an implicit fundamental causal conceptual typography within which a disposition ascription is embedded, framed, and understood. By placing the multiply qualified analysis within an implicit causal matrix involving a focal cause, pathway of influence, mechanism of action, contributing/partial cause, mediator, extrinsic moderator,, intrinsic moderator, and manifestation, we show how this analysis evades (...)
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  4. Jesse R. Steinberg (2005). Response to Fritz Allhoff, "Telomeres and the Ethics of Human Cloning". American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):W27-W28.
    Fritz Allhoff has recently offered an extremely compelling challenge to the morality of human cloning. He argues that a biological phenomenon, that of telomere shortening, undermines the moral permissibility of human cloning. Telomere shortening is caused by cell replication, and appears to be one of the central reasons that cells and organisms age and die. Allhoff considers a thirty-year-old woman who wishes to create a genetic clone. He notes that the DNA from her cell that would be used to create (...)
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  5. Jesse R. Steinberg (2010). Dispositions and Subjunctives. Philosophical Studies 148 (3):323 - 341.
    It is generally agreed that dispositions cannot be analyzed in terms of simple subjunctive conditionals (because of what are called “masked dispositions” and “finkish dispositions”). I here defend a qualified subjunctive account of dispositions according to which an object is disposed to Φ when conditions C obtain if and only if, if conditions C were to obtain, then the object would Φ ceteris paribus . I argue that this account does not fall prey to the objections that have been raised (...)
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  6. Jesse Steinberg (2009). Weak Motivational Internalism, Lite: Dispositions, Moral Judgments, and What We're Motivated to Do. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (sup1):1-24.
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  7.  89
    Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin & Jesse Steinberg (2011). Ethics of Human Enhancement: An Executive Summary. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):201-212.
    With multi-year funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), a team of researchers has just released a comprehensive report detailing ethical issues arising from human enhancement (Allhoff et al. 2009). While we direct the interested reader to that (much longer) report, we also thank the editors of this journal for the invitation to provide an executive summary thereof. This summary highlights key results from each section of that report and does so in a self-standing way; in other words, this (...)
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  8.  67
    Jesse R. Steinberg (2005). Why an Unsurpassable Being Cannot Create a Surpassable World. Religious Studies 41 (3):323-333.
    Daniel and Frances Howard-Snyder suggest that it is possible for an omnipotent being, Jove, to create randomly a world from a continuum of ever more perfect possible worlds. They then go on to argue that Jove could be characterized as morally unsurpassable despite creating a surpassable world. I raise a number of problems for the view that Jove could be characterized as morally unsurpassable when he creates (randomly or not) a surpassable world.
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  9.  87
    Jesse R. Steinberg (2007). Leibniz, Creation and the Best of All Possible Worlds. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (3):123 - 133.
    Leibniz argued that God would not create a world unless it was the best possible world. I defend Leibniz’s argument. I then consider whether God could refrain from creating if there were no best possible world. I argue that God, on pain of contradiction, could not refrain from creating in such a situation. I conclude that either this is the best possible world or God is not our creator.
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  10.  55
    Jesse R. Steinberg, Christopher M. Layne & Alan M. Steinberg (2012). Ceteris Paribus Causal Generalizations and Scientific Inquiry in Empirical Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (3):180-190.
    In defending the scientific legitimacy of ceteris paribus qualified causal generalizations, we situate and specify the reference of the ceteris paribus proviso within a fundamental causal framework consisting of causal agents, pathways of influence, mediators, moderators, and causal consequences. In so doing, we provide an explication of the reference and utility of the ceteris paribus proviso in terms of mediators and moderators as these constitute the range of factors that can impinge on the relation between cause and effect. We argue (...)
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  11.  77
    Jesse R. Steinberg (2007). Concerning the Preservation of God's Omnipotence. Sophia 46 (1):1-5.
    Numerous examples have been offered that purportedly show that God cannot be omnipotent. I argue that a common response to such examples (i.e., that failure to do the impossible does not indicate a lack of power) does not preserve God’s omnipotence in the face of some of these examples. I consider another possible strategy for preserving God’s omnipotence in the face of these examples and find it wanting.
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  12.  30
    Jesse Steinberg, Dispositions, Moral Judgments, and What We're Motivated to Do.
    I argue that there is a continuum of judgments ranging from those that are affectively rich, what might be called passionate judgments, to those that are purely cognitive and nonaffective, what might be called dispassionate judgments. The former are akin to desires and other affective states and so are necessarily motivating. Applying this schema to moral judgments, I maintain that the motivational internalist is wrong in claiming that all moral judgments are necessarily motivating, but right in regard to the subset (...)
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  13.  3
    Jesse R. Steinberg (2012). Doubt and the Human Condition. In Jesse R. Steinberg & Abrol Fairweather (eds.), Blues -- Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking Deep About Feeling Low. Wiley-Blackwell 111--120.
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  14.  16
    Jesse R. Steinberg (2008). Review of Savas L. Tsohatzidis (Ed.), John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning and Mind. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
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  15. Fritz Allhoff, Jesse R. Steinberg & Abrol Fairweather (eds.) (2011). Blues - Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking Deep About Feeling Low. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _The philosophy of the blues_ From B.B. King to Billie Holiday, Blues music not only sounds good, but has an almost universal appeal in its reflection of the trials and tribulations of everyday life. Its ability to powerfully touch on a range of social and emotional issues is philosophically inspiring, and here, a diverse range of thinkers and musicians offer illuminating essays that make important connections between the human condition and the Blues that will appeal to music lovers and philosophers (...)
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  16.  15
    Jesse R. Steinberg & Abrol Fairweather (eds.) (2012). Blues -- Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking Deep About Feeling Low. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _The philosophy of the blues_ From B.B. King to Billie Holiday, Blues music not only sounds good, but has an almost universal appeal in its reflection of the trials and tribulations of everyday life. Its ability to powerfully touch on a range of social and emotional issues is philosophically inspiring, and here, a diverse range of thinkers and musicians offer illuminating essays that make important connections between the human condition and the Blues that will appeal to music lovers and philosophers (...)
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  17. Jesse Steinberg (2005). Reply to Allhoff on Telomeres and the Ethics of Cloning. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):27-28.
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  18. Jesse Steinberg, Two Solutions to Kripke's Puzzle About Belief.
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  19. Kimberly Connor (2012). If It Weren't for Bad Luck, I Wouldn't Have No Luck at All : Blues and the Human Condition. Why Can't We Be Satisfied? : Blues is Knowin' How to Cope / Brian Domino ; Doubt and the Human Condition : Nobody Loves Me but My Momma- and She Might Be Jivin' Too / Jesse R. Steinberg ; Blues and Emotional Trauma : Blues as Musical Therapy / Robert D. Stolorow and Benjamin A. Stolorow ; Suffering, Spirituality, and Sensuality : Religion and the Blues / Joseph J. Lynch ; Worrying the Line : Blues as Story, Song, and Prayer. [REVIEW] In Jesse R. Steinberg & Abrol Fairweather (eds.), Blues -- Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking Deep About Feeling Low. Wiley-Blackwell
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  20. Judith N. Lasker, Susan Borg, Christine Overall, Patricia Spallone, Deborah Lynn Steinberg & Michelle Stanworth (1989). In Search of Parenthood. Hypatia 4 (3):136-149.
    A critical review of four recent works that reflect current conflicts and tensions among feminists regarding new reproductive technologies: In Search of Parenthood by Judith Lasker and Susan Borg; Ethics and Human Reproduction by Christine Overall; Made to Order, Patricia Spallone and Deborah Steinberg, eds. and Reproductive Technologies: Gender, Motherhood and Medicine, Michelle Stanworth, ed. Their positions are evaluated against the background of growing feminist dialogue about the future of reproduction and the bearing of reproductive innovations on such related (...)
     
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  21.  44
    David Steinberg (2010). Altruism in Medicine: Its Definition, Nature, and Dilemmas. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (2):249.
    A significant portion of the practice of medicine is dependent on individual acts of medical altruism. Many of these acts, such as the donation of blood, gametes, stem cells, and organs, entail varying degrees of bodily intrusion and, for the altruist, various combinations of discomfort, risk, and expense. Discussion of the ethics of altruism has typically been fragmented under various rubrics such as blood donation, organ and tissue transplantation, health information, and the assisted reproductive technologies. The ethics of these specific (...)
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  22. Leo Steinberg (1980). The Line of Fate in Michelangelo's Painting. Critical Inquiry 6 (3):411-454.
    Let us agree, to begin with, that we are not shown [in Last Judgment], as Life Magazine long ago phrased it, a Saint Bartholomew who "holds his own mortal skin, in which Michelangelo whimsically painted a distorted portrait of himself.”1 The face was sloughed with the rest of the skin and goes with it. What we see is a Saint Bartholomew with another's integument in his hand. We next consider an aspect of the self-portrait which even La Cava left out (...)
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  23.  41
    Jeremy Gwiazda (2010). God's Random Selection: Reply to Steinberg. Sophia 49 (1):141-143.
    In this reply to Jesse Steinberg’s ‘God and the possibility of random creation’, I suggest a procedure whereby a being such as God could randomly select a number from an infinite set.
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  24.  32
    David Steinberg (2004). An "Opting in" Paradigm for Kidney Transplantation. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):4 – 14.
    Almost 60,000 people in the United States with end stage renal disease are waiting for a kidney transplant. Because of the scarcity of organs from deceased donors live kidney donors have become a critical source of organs; in 2001, for the first time in recent decades, the number of live kidney donors exceeded the number of deceased donors. The paradigm used to justify putting live kidney donors at risk includes the low risk to the donor, the favorable risk-benefit ratio, the (...)
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  25.  20
    L. Steinberg (2013). Does Recent Research on Adolescent Brain Development Inform the Mature Minor Doctrine? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (3):256-267.
    US Supreme Court rulings concerning sanctions for juvenile offenders have drawn on the science of brain development and concluded that adolescents are inherently less mature than adults in ways that render them less culpable. This conclusion departs from arguments made in cases involving the mature minor doctrine, in which teenagers have been portrayed as comparable to adults in their capacity to make medical decisions. I attempt to reconcile these apparently incompatible views of adolescents’ decision-making competence. Adolescents are indeed less mature (...)
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  26.  30
    Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Haluk Ogmen, Jose Ramon & Jian Chen (2005). Unconscious and Conscious Priming by Forms and Their Parts. Visual Cognition 12 (5):720-736.
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  27.  16
    Alan Jotkowitz & Avraham Steinberg (2006). Multiculturalism and End-of-Life Care: The New Israeli Law for the Terminally III Patient. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):17 – 19.
  28. Benjamin Schnieder, Moritz Schulz & Alexander Steinberg (2010). What Might Be and What Might Have Been. In S.-J. Conrad & S. Imhof (eds.), Strawson - Concept and Object. Ontos
    The article is an extended comment on Strawson’s neglected paper ‘Maybes and Might Have Beens’, in which he suggests that both statements about what may be the case and statements about what might have been the case can be understood epistemically. We argue that Strawson is right about the first sort of statements but wrong about the second. Finally, we discuss some of Strawson’s claims which are related to positions of Origin Essentialism.
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  29.  7
    Robert Bringle, Morgan Studer, Jarod Wilson, Patti Clayton & Kathryn Steinberg (2011). Designing Programs with a Purpose: To Promote Civic Engagement for Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (2):149-164.
    Curricular and co-curricular civic engagement activities and programs are analyzed in terms of their capacity to contribute to a common set of outcomes associated with nurturing civic-minded graduates: academic knowledge, familiarity with volunteering and nonprofit sector, knowledge of social issues, communication skills, diversity skills, self-efficacy, and intentions to be involved in communities. Different programs that promote civic-mindedness, developmental models, and assessment strategies that can contribute to program enhancement are presented.
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  30.  1
    David Steinberg (2002). Clinical Research Should Not Be Permitted to Escape the Ethical Orbit of Clinical Care. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):27 – 28.
    (2002). Clinical Research Should Not Be Permitted to Escape the Ethical Orbit of Clinical Care. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 27-28.
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  31. Justin Steinberg (2010). Spinoza’s Curious Defense of Toleration. In Yitzhak Melamed Michael Rosenthal (ed.), Spinoza’s ‘Theological-Political Treatise’: A Critical Guide. Cambridge
  32.  2
    David Steinberg (2004). Mythic Ideals. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):122-123.
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  33.  38
    Marc W. Steinberg (1998). Tilting the Frame: Considerations on Collective Action Framing From a Discursive Turn. Theory and Society 27 (6):845-872.
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  34.  18
    Justin Steinberg (2008). Spinoza's Political Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  35.  55
    Justin Steinberg (2009). Spinoza on Civil Liberation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 35-58.
    In the final chapter of the Tractactus Theologico-Politicus , Spinoza declares that “the purpose of the state is, in reality, freedom.” While this remark obviously purports to tell us something important about Spinoza’s conception of the civitas , it is not clear exactly what is revealed. Recently, a number of scholars have interpreted this passage in a way that supports the view that Spinoza was a liberal for whom civic norms are rather more modest than the freedom of the Ethics (...)
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  36.  76
    Alexander Steinberg (2013). Pleonastic Possible Worlds. Philosophical Studies 164 (3):767-789.
    The role of possible worlds in philosophy is hard to overestimate. Nevertheless, their nature and existence is very controversial. This is particularly serious, since their standard applications depend on there being sufficiently many of them. The paper develops an account of possible worlds on which it is particularly easy to believe in their existence: an account of possible worlds as pleonastic entities. Pleonastic entities are entities whose existence can be validly inferred from statements that neither refer to nor quantify over (...)
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  37.  77
    Miguel Hoeltje, Benjamin Schnieder & Alex Steinberg (2013). Explanation by Induction? Synthese 190 (3):509-524.
    Philosophers of mathematics commonly distinguish between explanatory and non-explanatory proofs. An important subclass of mathematical proofs are proofs by induction. Are they explanatory? This paper addresses the question, based on general principles about explanation. First, a recent argument for a negative answer is discussed and rebutted. Second, a case is made for a qualified positive take on the issue.
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  38.  23
    Diane Steinberg (1987). Necessity and Essence in Spinoza. Modern Schoolman 64 (3):187-195.
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  39.  40
    David Steinberg (2004). Kidney Transplants From Young Children and the Mentally Retarded. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):229-241.
    Kidney donation by young children and the mentally retarded has been supported by court decisions, arguments based on obligations inherent in family relationships, an array of contextual factors, and the principle of beneficence. These justifications for taking organs from people who cannot protect themselves are problematic and must be weighed against our obligation to protect the vulnerable. A compromise solution is presented that strongly protects young children and the mentally retarded but does not abdicate all responsibility to relieve suffering. Guidelines (...)
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  40.  23
    Diane Steinberg (2005). Belief, Affirmation, and the Doctrine of Conatus in Spinoza. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):147-158.
  41.  8
    David Steinberg (2005). Response to “Special Section on Children as Organ Donors” : A Critique. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (3):301-305.
    I would have preferred that the Special Section on Children as Organ Donors had focused on the donation of a specific organ because morally relevant differences are obscured when the subject is discussed in general terms. The donation of a lobe of liver and peripheral blood or bone marrow stem cells does not result in the permanent loss of vital tissue because these organs regenerate; however, a kidney does not regenerate and its donor loses a vital organ permanently. Liver tissue (...)
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  42.  20
    Diane Steinberg (1981). Spinoza's Theory of the Eternity of the Mind. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):35 - 68.
  43.  38
    Eric Steinberg (2001). Themes in Hume. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 27 (2):337-341.
  44.  25
    Alex Steinberg (2014). Defining Global Supervenience. Erkenntnis 79 (2):367-380.
    What does it mean that certain properties globally supervene on others? The paper criticises the now standard way of spelling out the notion in terms of 1–1 correlations between world-domains and proposes a modification that escapes the difficulties. The new definition can secure the additional benefit of resisting an argument to the effect that global supervenience is theoretically dispensable.
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  45.  49
    Danny D. Steinberg (1976). Competence, Performance and the Psychological Invalidity of Chomsky's Grammar. Synthese 32 (3-4):373 - 386.
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  46.  36
    Jennifer G. Jesse (2011). Reflections on the Benefits and Risks of Interdisciplinary Study in Theology, Philosophy, and Literature. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (1):62 - 73.
    In recent years, multidisciplinary study has become all the rage in academic circles. Scholars have been going all out for interdisciplinarity, not only in research programs, but pedagogically in the classroom, and structurally in higher education curricula. Fewer and fewer cautionary voices are being heeded or even heard in this conversation. In this essay, I advocate a mediating position on this issue that has emerged from reflecting on my own professional work with interdisciplinary scholarship. That work includes research, scholarship, and (...)
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  47.  19
    Diana Burns Steinberg (1984). Spinoza's Ethical Doctrine and the Unity of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (3):303-324.
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  48.  22
    Justin Steinberg (2011). Spinoza, by Michael Della Rocca. [REVIEW] Mind 120 (479):852-856.
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  49.  24
    Diane Steinberg (1986). A Note on Bennett's Transattribute Differentiae and Spinoza's Substance Monism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (3):431-435.
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  50.  10
    Ira S. Steinberg (1975). Teaching, Learning, and the Mind. Studies in Philosophy and Education 9 (1-2):84-112.
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