Results for 'Jessica Woolley'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  39
    Wittgenstein in Exile by James C. Klagge (Review).Rupert Read & Jessica Woolley - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):499-500.
    James Klagge aims to shed light on Wittgenstein’s philosophy by situating it in its biographical–cultural context. While Klagge is not alone in pursuing this aim, his claim to originality lies in his thematic focus on Wittgenstein’s relationship to his time and culture as one of “alienation” (3), expressed by the metaphor of being “in exile” (61). A central concern of Klagge’s is how we, as modern readers living in a “civilized” culture not dissimilar to the one from which Wittgenstein felt (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  48
    Brad Wray Kuhn's Evolutionary Social Epistemology.Rupert Read & Jessica Woolley - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (3):659-664.
  3.  13
    Woolley. Alalakh. An Account of the Excavations at Tell Atchana in the Hatay, 1937–1949. [Reports of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London, No. XVIII.] Oxford: University Press, for Society of Antiquaries, 1955. Pp. Xi + 411, with 131 Plates and 81 Text Figures. £ 7 7s. [REVIEW]R. D. Barnett & L. Woolley - 1957 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 77 (2):355-357.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. What is Visual Culture? Jessica Evans and Stuart Hall.Jessica Evans - 1999 - In Jessica Evans & Stuart Hall (eds.), Visual Culture: The Reader. Sage Publications in Association with the Open University. pp. 1.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5. Ethical Guidelines for COVID-19 Tracing Apps.Jessica Morley, Josh Cowls, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Nature 582:29–⁠31.
    Technologies to rapidly alert people when they have been in contact with someone carrying the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 are part of a strategy to bring the pandemic under control. Currently, at least 47 contact-tracing apps are available globally. They are already in use in Australia, South Korea and Singapore, for instance. And many other governments are testing or considering them. Here we set out 16 questions to assess whether — and to what extent — a contact-tracing app is ethically justifiable.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  6.  43
    From Simple Desires to Ordinary Beliefs: The Early Development of Everyday Psychology.Henry M. Wellman & Jacqueline D. Woolley - 1990 - Cognition 35 (3):245-275.
  7.  1
    Pharmaceutical Freedom: Why Patients Have a Right to Self Medicate.Jessica Flanigan - 2017 - Oup Usa.
    Jessica Flanigan defends patients' rights of self-medication on the grounds that same moral reasons against medical paternalism in clinical contexts are also reasons against paternalistic pharmaceutical policies, including prohibitive approval processes and prescription requirements.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  8.  43
    A Comment on “Editorial 37”.Brian T. Sutcliffe & R. Guy Woolley - 2011 - Foundations of Chemistry 13 (2):93-95.
    A comment on “Editorial 37” Content Type Journal Article Pages 93-95 DOI 10.1007/s10698-011-9110-4 Authors Brian T. Sutcliffe, Laboratoire de Chimie quantique et Photophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Bruxelles, Belgium R. Guy Woolley, School of Biomedical and Natural Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, NG11 8NS UK Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 2.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  9. “Virtue Makes the Goal Right”: Virtue and Phronesis in Aristotle’s Ethics.Jessica Moss - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (3):204-261.
    Aristotle repeatedly claims that character-virtue “makes the goal right“, while Phronesis is responsible for working out how to achieve the goal. Many argue that these claims are misleading: it must be intellect that tells us what ends to pursue. I argue that Aristotle means just what he seems to say: despite putative textual evidence to the contrary, virtue is (a) a wholly non-intellectual state, and (b) responsible for literally supplying the contents of our goals. Furthermore, there are no good textual (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  10. Infant Sensitivity to Distributional Information Can Affect Phonetic Discrimination.Jessica Maye, Janet F. Werker & LouAnn Gerken - 2002 - Cognition 82 (3):B101-B111.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   116 citations  
  11.  46
    Nurses' Moral Sensitivity and Hospital Ethical Climate: A Literature Review.Jessica Schluter, Sarah Winch, Kerri Holzhauser & Amanda Henderson - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (3):304-321.
    Increased technological and pharmacological interventions in patient care when patient outcomes are uncertain have been linked to the escalation in moral and ethical dilemmas experienced by health care providers in acute care settings. Health care research has shown that facilities that are able to attract and retain nursing staff in a competitive environment and provide high quality care have the capacity for nurses to process and resolve moral and ethical dilemmas. This article reports on the findings of a systematic review (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  12. What is Epistemic Blame?Jessica Brown - 2020 - Noûs 54 (2):389-407.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  13. What’s New About Fake News?Jessica Pepp, Eliot Michaelson & Rachel Sterken - 2019 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 16 (2).
    The term "fake news" ascended rapidly to prominence in 2016 and has become a fixture in academic and public discussions, as well as in political mud-slinging. In the flurry of discussion, the term has been applied so broadly as to threaten to render it meaningless. In an effort to rescue our ability to discuss—and combat—the underlying phenomenon that triggered the present use of the term, some philosophers have tried to characterize it more precisely. A common theme in this nascent philosophical (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  14.  1
    Reality Status Judgments of Real and Fantastical Events in Children’s Prefrontal Cortex: An fNIRS Study.Hui Li, Tao Liu, Jacqueline D. Woolley & Peng Zhang - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  15. Subject‐Sensitive Invariantism and the Knowledge Norm for Practical Reasoning.Jessica Brown - 2008 - Noûs 42 (2):167-189.
  16.  96
    Anti-Individualism and Knowledge.Jessica Brown - 2004 - MIT Press.
    A persuasive monograph that answers the keyepistemological arguments against anti-individualism in thephilosophy of mind.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  17.  20
    Action Experience Alters 3-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Others' Actions.Jessica A. Sommerville, Amanda L. Woodward & Amy Needham - 2005 - Cognition 96 (1):1-11.
  18.  62
    Aristotle on the Apparent Good: Perception, Phantasia, Thought, and Desire.Jessica Moss - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Pt. I. The apparent good. Evaluative cognition -- Perceiving the good -- Phantasia and the apparent good -- pt. II. The apparent good and non-rational motivation. Passions and the apparent good -- Akrasia and the apparent good -- pt. III. The apparent good and rational motivation. Phantasia and deliberation -- Happiness, virtue, and the apparent good -- Practical induction -- Conclusion : Aristotle's practical empiricism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  19. Assertion: New Philosophical Essays.Jessica Brown & Herman Cappelen (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Assertion is a fundamental feature of language. This volume will be the place to look for anyone interested in current work on the topic.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  20. The Birth of Belief.Jessica Moss & Whitney Schwab - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (1):1-32.
    did plato and aristotle have anything to say about belief? The answer to this question might seem blindingly obvious: of course they did. Plato distinguishes belief from knowledge in the Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus, and Aristotle does so in the Posterior Analytics. Plato distinguishes belief from perception in the Theaetetus, and Aristotle does so in the De anima. They talk about the distinction between true and false beliefs, and the ways in which belief can mislead and the ways in which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  21. Contextualism and Warranted Assertibility Manoeuvres.Jessica Brown - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (3):407 - 435.
    Contextualists such as Cohen and DeRose claim that the truth conditions of knowledge attributions vary contextually, in particular that the strength of epistemic position required for one to be truly ascribed knowledge depends on features of the attributor's context. Contextualists support their view by appeal to our intuitions about when it's correct (or incorrect) to ascribe knowledge. Someone might argue that some of these intuitions merely reflect when it is conversationally appropriate to ascribe knowledge, not when knowledge is truly ascribed, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   89 citations  
  22.  1
    Debating Sex Work.Jessica Flanigan & Lori Watson - 2019 - New York: Oup Usa.
    In this "for and against" book, ethicists Lori Watson and Jessica Flanigan debate the criminalization of sex work. Watson argues for a sex equality approach to prostitution in which buyers are criminalized and sellers are decriminalized, known as the Nordic Model. Flanigan argues that sex work should be fully decriminalized because decriminalization ensures respect for sex workers' and clients' rights, and is more effective than alternative policies.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  4
    Visualized Automatic Feedback in Virtual Teams.Ella Glikson, Anita W. Woolley, Pranav Gupta & Young Ji Kim - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  71
    Philosophy of Mathematical Practice — Motivations, Themes and Prospects.Jessica Carter - 2019 - Philosophia Mathematica 27 (1):1-32.
    ABSTRACT A number of examples of studies from the field ‘The Philosophy of Mathematical Practice’ are given. To characterise this new field, three different strands are identified: an agent-based, a historical, and an epistemological PMP. These differ in how they understand ‘practice’ and which assumptions lie at the core of their investigations. In the last part a general framework, capturing some overall structure of the field, is proposed.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  25. Knowledge and Assertion.Jessica Brown - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (3):549-566.
  26. Metaphysical Emergence: Weak and Strong.Jessica Wilson - 2015 - In Tomasz Bigaj & Christian Wuthrich (eds.), Metaphysics in Contemporary Physics. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities. pp. 251-306.
    Motivated by the seeming structure of the sciences, metaphysical emergence combines broadly synchronic dependence coupled with some degree of ontological and causal autonomy. Reflecting the diverse, frequently incompatible interpretations of the notions of dependence and autonomy, however, accounts of emergence diverge into a bewildering variety. Here I argue that much of this apparent diversity is superficial. I first argue, by attention to the problem of higher-level causation, that two and only two strategies for addressing this problem accommodate the genuine emergence (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  27.  89
    Capricious Kinds.Jessica Laimann - 2020 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (3):1043-1068.
    According to Ian Hacking, some human kinds are subject to a peculiar type of classificatory instability: individuals change in reaction to being classified, which in turn leads to a revision of our understanding of the kind. Hacking’s claim that these ‘human interactive kinds’ cannot be natural kinds has been vehemently criticized on the grounds that similar patterns of instability occur in paradigmatic examples of natural kinds. I argue that the dialectic of the extant debate misses the core conceptual problem of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  28. Bald-Faced Lies: How to Make a Move in a Language Game Without Making a Move in a Conversation.Jessica Keiser - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):461-477.
    According to the naïve, pre-theoretic conception, lying seems to be characterized by the intent to deceive. However, certain kinds of bald-faced lies appear to be counterexamples to this view, and many philosophers have abandoned it as a result. I argue that this criticism of the naïve view is misplaced; bald-faced lies are not genuine instances of lying because they are not genuine instances of assertion. I present an additional consideration in favor of the naïve view, which is that abandoning it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  29.  37
    Citizen science or scientific citizenship? Disentangling the uses of public engagement rhetoric in national research initiatives.J. Patrick Woolley, Michelle L. McGowan, Harriet J. A. Teare, Victoria Coathup, Jennifer R. Fishman, Richard A. Settersten, Sigrid Sterckx, Jane Kaye & Eric T. Juengst - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1.
    The language of “participant-driven research,” “crowdsourcing” and “citizen science” is increasingly being used to encourage the public to become involved in research ventures as both subjects and scientists. Originally, these labels were invoked by volunteer research efforts propelled by amateurs outside of traditional research institutions and aimed at appealing to those looking for more “democratic,” “patient-centric,” or “lay” alternatives to the professional science establishment. As mainstream translational biomedical research requires increasingly larger participant pools, however, corporate, academic and governmental research programs (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  30.  94
    Hypocrisy and Moral Authority.Jessica Isserow & Colin Klein - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 12 (2):191-222.
    Hypocrites invite moral opprobrium, and charges of hypocrisy are a significant and widespread feature of our moral lives. Yet it remains unclear what hypocrites have in common, or what is distinctively bad about them. We propose that hypocrites are persons who have undermined their claim to moral authority. Since this self-undermining can occur in a number of ways, our account construes hypocrisy as multiply realizable. As we explain, a person’s moral authority refers to a kind of standing that they occupy (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  31.  49
    Virtual Worlds: A Journey in Hype and Hyperreality.Benjamin Woolley - 1992 - Blackwell.
    In Virtual Worlds, Benjamin Woolley examines the reality of virtual reality.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  32.  59
    Courtney S. Cox and Jessica C. Campbell Reply.Courtney S. Campbell & Jessica C. Cox - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report 41 (4):8-9.
  33. A Defense of Compulsory Vaccination.Jessica Flanigan - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (1):5-25.
    Vaccine refusal harms and risks harming innocent bystanders. People are not entitled to harm innocents or to impose deadly risks on others, so in these cases there is nothing to be said for the right to refuse vaccination. Compulsory vaccination is therefore justified because non-vaccination can rightly be prohibited, just as other kinds of harmful and risky conduct are rightly prohibited. I develop an analogy to random gunfire to illustrate this point. Vaccine refusal, I argue, is morally similar to firing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  34.  49
    From What to How: An Initial Review of Publicly Available AI Ethics Tools, Methods and Research to Translate Principles Into Practices.Jessica Morley, Luciano Floridi, Libby Kinsey & Anat Elhalal - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):2141-2168.
    The debate about the ethical implications of Artificial Intelligence dates from the 1960s :741–742, 1960; Wiener in Cybernetics: or control and communication in the animal and the machine, MIT Press, New York, 1961). However, in recent years symbolic AI has been complemented and sometimes replaced by Neural Networks and Machine Learning techniques. This has vastly increased its potential utility and impact on society, with the consequence that the ethical debate has gone mainstream. Such a debate has primarily focused on principles—the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  35. Fundamental Determinables.Jessica M. Wilson - 2012 - Philosophers' Imprint 12.
    Contemporary philosophers commonly suppose that any fundamental entities there may be are maximally determinate. More generally, they commonly suppose that, whether or not there are fundamental entities, any determinable entities there may be are grounded in, hence less fundamental than, more determinate entities. So, for example, Armstrong takes the physical objects constituting the presumed fundamental base to be “determinate in all respects” (1961, 59), and Lewis takes the properties characterizing things “completely and without redundancy” to be “highly specific” (1986, 60). (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  36. Assertion, Lying, and Untruthfully Implicating.Jessica Pepp - 2019 - In Sanford C. Goldberg (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Assertion. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter explores the prospects for justifying the somewhat widespread, somewhat firmly held sense that there is some moral advantage to untruthfully implicating over lying. I call this the "Difference Intuition." I define lying in terms of asserting, but remain open about what precise definition best captures our ordinary notion. I define implicating as one way of meaning something without asserting it. I narrow down the kind of untruthful implicating that should be compared with lying for purposes of evaluating whether (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  37. Moral Worth and Doing the Right Thing by Accident.Jessica Isserow - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):251-264.
    ABSTRACTKantian conceptions of moral worth are thought to enjoy an advantage over their rivals in virtue of accommodating two plausible intuitions—that the praiseworthiness of an action is never ac...
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  38.  79
    Moral Worth: Having It Both Ways.Jessica Isserow - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy 117 (10):529-556.
    It is commonly recognized that one can act rightly without being praiseworthy for doing so. Those who act rightly from ignoble motives, for instance, do not strike us as fitting targets of moral praise; their actions seem to lack moral worth. Though there is broad agreement that only certain kinds of motives confer moral worth on our actions, there is disagreement as to which ones are up to the task. Many theorists confine themselves to two possibilities: praiseworthy agents are thought (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  30
    Pulling Out the Intentional Structure of Action: The Relation Between Action Processing and Action Production in Infancy.Jessica A. Sommerville & Amanda L. Woodward - 2005 - Cognition 95 (1):1-30.
  40.  81
    A Naturalist’s View of Pride.Jessica L. Tracy, Azim F. Shariff & Joey T. Cheng - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):163-177.
    Although pride has been central to philosophical and religious discussions of emotion for thousands of years, it has largely been neglected by psychologists. However, in the past decade a growing body of psychological research on pride has emerged; new theory and findings suggest that pride is a psychologically important and evolutionarily adaptive emotion. In this article we review this accumulated body of research and argue for a naturalist account of pride, which presumes that pride emerged by way of natural selection. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  41. Supervenience-Based Formulations of Physicalism.Jessica Wilson - 2005 - Noûs 39 (3):426-459.
    The physicalist thesis that all entities are nothing over and above physical entities is often interpreted as appealing to a supervenience-based account of "nothing over and aboveness”, where, schematically, the A-entities are nothing over and above the B-entities if the A-entities supervene on the B-entities. The main approaches to filling in this schema correspond to different ways of characterizing the modal strength, the supervenience base, or the supervenience connection at issue. I consider each approach in turn, and argue that the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   102 citations  
  42.  63
    Why We Should Keep Talking About Fake News.Jessica Pepp, Eliot Michaelson & Rachel Sterken - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    In response to Habgood-Coote (2019) and a growing number of scholars who argue that academics and journalists should stop talking about fake news and abandon the term, we argue that the reasons which have been offered for eschewing the term 'fake news' are not sufficient to justify such abandonment. Prima facie, then, we take ourselves and others to be justified in continuing to talk about fake news.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43.  79
    Knowledge Ascriptions.Jessica Brown & Mikkel Gerken (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Knowledge ascriptions are a central topic of research in both philosophy and science. In this collection of new essays on knowledge ascriptions, world class philosophers offer novel approaches to this long standing topic.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  44.  28
    An Evolutionary Approach to Understanding Distinct Emotions.Jessica L. Tracy - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):308-312.
    According to evolutionary accounts of distinct emotions, these emotions are shaped by natural selection to adjust the physiological, psychological, cognitive, and behavioral parameters of an organism to facilitate its capacity to respond adaptively to threats and opportunities present in the environment. This account has a number of implications, most notably: each distinct emotion serves, or served, an adaptive function, and emotions are comprised of multiple components, all of which should be functional. In this article, I briefly outline an evolutionary approach (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  45. Non-Reductive Realization and the Powers-Based Subset Strategy.Jessica M. Wilson - 2011 - The Monist (Issue on Powers) 94 (1):121-154.
    I argue that an adequate account of non-reductive realization must guarantee satisfaction of a certain condition on the token causal powers associated with (instances of) realized and realizing entities---namely, what I call the 'Subset Condition on Causal Powers' (first introduced in Wilson 1999). In terms of states, the condition requires that the token powers had by a realized state on a given occasion be a proper subset of the token powers had by the state that realizes it on that occasion. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  46. Essence and Mere Necessity.Jessica Leech - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82:309-332.
    Recently, a debate has developed between those who claim that essence can be explained in terms of de re modality (modalists), and those who claim that de re modality can be explained in terms of essence (essentialists). The aim of this paper is to suggest that we should reassess. It is assumed that either necessity is to be accounted for in terms of essence, or that essence is to be accounted for in terms of necessity. I will argue that we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  47. From Essence to Necessity Via Identity.Jessica Leech - 2021 - Mind 130 (519):887-908.
    An essentialist theory of modality claims that the source of possibility and necessity lies in essence, where essence is then not to be defined in terms of necessity. Hence such theories owe us an account of why it is that the essences of things give rise to necessities in the way required. A new approach to understanding essence in terms of the notion of generalized identity promises to answer this challenge by appeal to the necessity of identity. I explore the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48. Knowing-How: Linguistics and Cognitive Science.Jessica Brown - 2013 - Analysis 73 (2):220-227.
    Stanley and Williamson have defended the intellectualist thesis that knowing-how is a subspecies of knowing-that by appeal to the syntax and semantics of ascriptions of knowing-how. Critics have objected that this way of defending intellectualism places undue weight on linguistic considerations and fails to give sufficient attention to empirical considerations from the scientific study of the mind. In this paper, I examine and reject Stanley's recent attempt to answer the critics.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  49.  47
    ‘Any Animal Whatever'.Jessica C. Flack & Frans Bm de Waal - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    To what degree has biology influenced and shaped the development of moral systems? One way to determine the extent to which human moral systems might be the product of natural selection is to explore behaviour in other species that is analogous and perhaps homologous to our own. Many non-human primates, for example, have similar methods to humans for resolving, managing, and preventing conflicts of interests within their groups. Such methods, which include reciprocity and food sharing, reconciliation, consolation, conflict intervention, and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  50. Logic and the Laws of Thought.Jessica Leech - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    An approach to explaining the nature and source of logic and its laws with a rich historical tradition takes the laws of logic to be laws of thought. This view seems intuitively compelling, after all, logic seems to be intimately related with how we think. But how exactly should we understand it? And what arguments can we give in favour? I will propose one line of argument for the claim that the laws of logic are laws of thought. I will (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000