Results for 'Jim Bingen*'

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  1.  19
    Standards and Corporate Reconstruction in the Michigan Dry Bean Industry.Jim Bingen & Andile Siyengo - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (4):311-323.
    Since the turn of the lastcentury, Michigan farmers, elevators, and stategovernment have used production and processstandards to shape the dry bean industry totheir interests and set a worldwide standardfor quality dry beans. Over the last 20 years,however, multinational agro/food firms haveintroduced their market criteria into standardssetting, and recent changes in Michigan beanstandards largely accommodate the interests ofthese firms. A review of the changes in thesestandards over time allows us to explore howconcepts of accountability and control improveour understanding of changes in (...)
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  2.  18
    Labels of Origin for Food, the New Economy and Opportunities for Rural Development in the US.Jim Bingen - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):543-552.
    This paper draws upon the events surrounding two small United States Department of Agriculture-funded projects in order to explore some preliminary ideas about the influence of corporations in US policy-making through federal advisory committees created by the 1972 Federal Advisory Committee Act. Following a synopsis of the political controversy created by the efforts of these projects to generate more discussion of geographical indications in the US, this paper outlines a path for further analysis of the relationships between members of advisory (...)
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  3.  64
    Place and Civic Culture: Re-Thinking the Context for Local Agriculture. [REVIEW]Laura B. Delind & Jim Bingen* - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (2):127-151.
    This article considers the qualitative concept of place – what it means, how it feels, how it is expressed, and how it is managed across time and space as the appropriate context within which to study and promote local agriculture and the locus of relationships, both cultural and political, that prefigure a local civic culture. It argues that civic as a description of local food and farming is conceptually and practically shallow in the absence of our ability to understand and (...)
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  4.  11
    Metropolitan Farmers Markets in Minneapolis and Vienna: A Values-Based Comparison.Milena Klimek, Jim Bingen & Bernhard Freyer - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (1):83-97.
    Farmers markets have traditionally served as a space for farmers to sell directly to consumers. Recently, many FMs in the US and other regions have experienced a renaissance. This article compares the different value sets embedded in the rules and norms of two metropolitan FM regions—Minneapolis, Minnesota and in Vienna, Austria. It uses a values-based framework that reflects the relationships among FM operating structures and their values reflected by the key FM participants—i.e., farmer/vendors, consumers and market managers. The framework allows (...)
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  5.  25
    Shaping Our Agro-Food System: Whose Standards Count? Guest Editor Observations. [REVIEW]Jim Bingen - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (4):279-281.
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  6. The Letters of Hildegard of Bingen: Volume Ii.Hildegard of Bingen - 1998 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This is the second volume in what will be a translation with full scholarly apparatus of the entire correspondence of St. Hildegard of Bingen. The translation follows Van Acker's definitive new edition of the Latin text, which is being published serially in Belgium by Brepols. As in that edition, the letters are organized according to the rank of the addressees. The first volume included ninety letters to and from the highest ranking prelates in Hildegard's world: popes, archbishops, and bishops. Volume (...)
     
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  7. The Letters of Hildegard of Bingen: Volume I.Hildegard of Bingen - 1998 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The first of four volumes that will present the only English translation of the complete correspondence of the remarkable twelfth-century Benedictine abbess Hildegard of Bingen, this study consists of nearly four hundred letters addressed to some of the most notable people of the day.
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  8. The Letters of Hildegard of Bingen: Volume 2.Hildegard of Bingen - 1998 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This is the second volume in what will be a translation with full scholarly apparatus of the entire correspondence of St. Hildegard of Bingen. The translation follows Van Acker's definitive new edition of the Latin text, which is being published serially in Belgium by Brepols. As in that edition, the letters are organized according to the rank of the addressees. The first volume included ninety letters to and from the highest ranking prelates in Hildegard's world: popes, archbishops, and bishops. Volume (...)
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  9. The Letters of Hildegard of Bingen: Volume 1.Hildegard of Bingen - 1998 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The first of four volumes that will present the only English translation of the complete correspondence of the remarkable twelfth-century Benedictine abbess Hildegard of Bingen, this study consists of nearly four hundred letters addressed to some of the most notable people of the day.
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  10. Marking the Land: Jim Dow in North Dakota.Jim Dow & Laurel Reuter - 2007 - Center for American Places.
  11.  57
    Letter From President Jim Campbell on the State of the Society.Jim Campbell - 2009 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):4-4.
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  12. What is a Mechanism? A Counterfactual Account.Jim Woodward - 2002 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2002 (3):S366-S377.
    This paper presents a counterfactual account of what a mechanism is. Mechanisms consist of parts, the behavior of which conforms to generalizations that are invariant under interventions, and which are modular in the sense that it is possible in principle to change the behavior of one part independently of the others. Each of these features can be captured by the truth of certain counterfactuals.
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  13. Regularities and Causality; Generalizations and Causal Explanations.Jim Bogen - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (2):397-420.
    Machamer, Darden, and Craver argue that causal explanations explain effects by describing the operations of the mechanisms which produce them. One of this paper’s aims is to take advantage of neglected resources of Mechanism to rethink the traditional idea that actual or counterfactual natural regularities are essential to the distinction between causal and non-causal co-occurrences, and that generalizations describing natural regularities are essential components of causal explanations. I think that causal productivity and regularity are by no means the same thing, (...)
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  14.  23
    What Is a Mechanism? A Counterfactual Account.Jim Woodward - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (S3):S366-S377.
    This paper presents a counterfactual account of what a mechanism is. Mechanisms consist of parts, the behavior of which conforms to generalizations that are invariant under interventions, and which are modular in the sense that it is possible in principle to change the behavior of one part independently of the others. Each of these features can be captured by the truth of certain counterfactuals.
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  15.  11
    Māra in the Chinese Samyuktāgamas, with a Translation of the Māra Samyukta of the Bieyi Za Ahan Jing.Marcus Bingenheimer - 2007 - Buddhist Studies Review 24 (1):46-74.
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  16. Data and Phenomena.Jim Woodward - 1989 - Synthese 79 (3):393 - 472.
  17.  81
    Response to Strevens.Jim Woodward - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (1):193-212.
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  18. Law and Explanation in Biology: Invariance is the Kind of Stability That Matters.Jim Woodward - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (1):1-20.
    This paper develops an account of explanation in biology which does not involve appeal to laws of nature, at least as traditionally conceived. Explanatory generalizations in biology must satisfy a requirement that I call invariance, but need not satisfy most of the other standard criteria for lawfulness. Once this point is recognized, there is little motivation for regarding such generalizations as laws of nature. Some of the differences between invariance and the related notions of stability and resiliency, due respectively to (...)
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  19.  97
    Explanation, Invariance, and Intervention.Jim Woodward - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):41.
    This paper defends a counterfactual account of explanation, according to which successful explanation requires tracing patterns of counterfactual dependence of a special sort, involving what I call active counterfactuals. Explanations having this feature must appeal to generalizations that are invariant--stable under certain sorts of changes. These ideas are illustrated by examples drawn from physics and econometrics.
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  20.  21
    Explanation in Psychology: Functional Support for Anomalous Monism: Jim Edwards.Jim Edwards - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:45-64.
    Donald Davidson finds folk-psychological explanations anomalous due to the open-ended and constitutive conception of rationality which they employ, and yet monist because they invoke an ontology of only physical events. An eliminative materialist who thinks that the beliefs and desires of folk-psychology are mere pre-scientific fictions cannot accept these claims, but he could accept anomalous monism construed as an analysis , merely, of the ideological and ontological presumptions of folk-psychology. Of course, eliminative materialism is itself only a guess, a marker (...)
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  21. Why Potentiality Matters.Jim Stone - 1987 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):815-829.
    Do fetuses have a right to life in virtue of the fact that they are potential adult human beings? I take the claim that the fetus is a potential adult human being to come to this: if the fetus grows normally there will be an adult human animal that was once the fetus. Does this fact ground a claim to our care and protection? A great deal hangs on the answer to this question. The actual mental and physical capacities of (...)
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  22.  72
    Analysing Causality: The Opposite of Counterfactual is Factual.Jim Bogen - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 18 (1):3 – 26.
    Using Jim Woodward's Counterfactual Dependency account as an example, I argue that causal claims about indeterministic systems cannot be satisfactorily analysed as including counterfactual conditionals among their truth conditions because the counterfactuals such accounts must appeal to need not have truth values. Where this happens, counterfactual analyses transform true causal claims into expressions which are not true.
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  23. Contextualism and Warranted Assertion.Jim Stone - 2007 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):92–113.
    Contextualists offer "high-low standards" practical cases to show that a variety of knowledge standards are in play in different ordinary contexts. These cases show nothing of the sort, I maintain. However Keith DeRose gives an ingenious argument that standards for knowledge do go up in high-stakes cases. According to the knowledge account of assertion (Kn), only knowledge warrants assertion. Kn combined with the context sensitivity of assertability yields contextualism about knowledge. But is Kn correct? I offer a rival account of (...)
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  24. Data, Phenomena, and Reliability.Jim Woodward - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):179.
    This paper explores how data serve as evidence for phenomena. In contrast to standard philosophical models which invite us to think of evidential relationships as logical relationships, I argue that evidential relationships in the context of data-to-phenomena reasoning are empirical relationships that depend on holding the right sort of pattern of counterfactual dependence between the data and the conclusions investigators reach on the phenomena themselves.
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  25.  82
    E-Sports Are Not Sports.Jim Parry - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):3-18.
    The conclusion of this paper will be that e-sports are not sports. I begin by offering a stipulation and a definition. I stipulate that what I have in mind, when thinking about the concept of sport, is ‘Olympic’ sport. And I define an Olympic Sport as an institutionalised, rule-governed contest of human physical skill. The justification for the stipulation lies partly in that it is uncontroversial. Whatever else people might think of as sport, no-one denies that Olympic Sport is sport. (...)
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  26. Hildegard of Bingen: A Feminist Ontology.Jane Duran - 2014 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (2):155--167.
    Two major lines of argument support the notion that Hildegard of Bingen’s metaphysics is peculiarly gynocentric. Contra the standard commentary on her work, the focus is not on the notion of viriditas; rather, the first line of argument presents a specific delineation of her ontology, demonstrating that it is a graded hierarchy of beings, many of which present feminine aspects of the divine, and all of which establish the metaphysical notion of interpenetrability. The second line of argument specifically contrasts her (...)
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  27. Interventionist Theories of Causation in Psychological Perspective.Jim Woodward - 2007 - In Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.), Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press. pp. 19--36.
  28. Why Counterpart Theory and Four-Dimensionalism Are Incompatible.Jim Stone - 2005 - Analysis 65 (4):329-333.
  29.  14
    Inference of Trustworthiness From Intuitive Moral Judgments.Jim A. C. Everett, David A. Pizarro & M. J. Crockett - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (6):772-787.
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  30. Why Counterpart Theory and Three-Dimensionalism Are Incompatible.Jim Stone - 2005 - Analysis 65 (1):24-27.
  31. Causally Productive Activities.Jim Bogen - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):112-123.
    This paper suggests and discusses an answer to the following question: What distinguishes causal from non-causal or coincidental co-occurrences? The answer derives from Elizabeth Anscombe’s idea that causality is a highly abstract concept whose meaning derives from our understanding of specific causally productive activities, and from her rejection of the assumption that causality can be informatively understood in terms of actual or counterfactual regularities.Keywords: Elizabeth Anscombe; Causality; Explanation; Inhibition.
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  32. Why There Still Are No People.Jim Stone - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):174-191.
    This paper argues that there are no people. If identity isn't what matters in survival, psychological connectedness isn't what matters either. Further, fissioning cases do not support the claim that connectedness is what matters. I consider Peter Unger's view that what matters is a continuous physical realization of a core psychology. I conclude that if identity isn't what matters in survival, nothing matters. This conclusion is deployed to argue that there are no people. Objections to Eliminativism are considered, especially that (...)
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  33. Theory and Observation in Science.Jim Bogen - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Scientists obtain a great deal of the evidence they use by observingnatural and experimentally generated objects and effects. Much of thestandard philosophical literature on this subject comes from20th century logical positivists and empiricists, theirfollowers, and critics who embraced their issues and accepted some oftheir assumptions even as they objected to specific views. Theirdiscussions of observational evidence tend to focus on epistemologicalquestions about its role in theory testing. This entry follows theirlead even though observational evidence also plays important andphilosophically interesting roles (...)
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  34.  5
    The Bhikṣuṇī Saṃyukta in the Shorter Chinese Saṃyukta Āgama.Marcus Bingenheimer - 2008 - Buddhist Studies Review 25 (1):5-26.
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  35.  5
    The Sutta_s on Sakka in _Āgama_ and _Nikāya_ Literature – with Some Remarks on the Attribution of the Shorter Chinese _Saṃyukta Āgama.Marcus Bingenheimer - 2008 - Buddhist Studies Review 25 (2):149-173.
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  36.  6
    The Shorter Chinese Saṃyukta Āgama:Preliminary Findings and Translation of Fascicle.Marcus Bingenheimer - 2007 - Buddhist Studies Review 23 (1):21-60.
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  37.  44
    The “Permanent Deposit” of Hegelian Thought in Dewey’s Theory of Inquiry.Jim Garrison - 2006 - Educational Theory 56 (1):1-37.
    In this essay, Jim Garrison explores the emerging scholarship establishing a Hegelian continuity in John Dewey’s thought from his earliest publications to the work published in the last decade of his life. The primary goals of this study are, first, to introduce this new scholarship to philosophers of education and, second, to extend this analysis to new domains, including Dewey’s theory of inquiry, universals, and creative action. Ultimately, Garrison’s analysis also refutes the traditional account that claims that William James converted (...)
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  38.  37
    A Tragedy of the Commons: Interpreting the Replication Crisis in Psychology as a Social Dilemma for Early-Career Researchers.Jim A. C. Everett & Brian D. Earp - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  39.  12
    Switching Tracks? Towards a Multidimensional Model of Utilitarian Psychology.Jim A. C. Everett & Guy Kahane - 2020 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences.
    Sacrificial moral dilemmas are widely used to investigate when, how, and why people make judgments that are consistent with utilitarianism. But to what extent can responses to sacrificial dilemmas shed light on utilitarian decision making? We consider two key questions: First, how meaningful is the relationship between responses to sacrificial dilemmas and what is distinctive of a utilitarian approach to morality? Second, to what extent do findings about sacrificial dilemmas generalise to other moral contexts where there is tension between utilitarianism (...)
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  40. The Epistemological Skyhook: Determinism, Naturalism, and Self-Defeat.Jim Slagle - 2016 - Routledge.
    Throughout philosophical history, there has been a recurring argument to the effect that determinism, naturalism, or both are self-referentially incoherent. By accepting determinism or naturalism, one allegedly acquires a reason to reject determinism or naturalism. _The Epistemological Skyhook_ brings together, for the first time, the principal expressions of this argument, focusing primarily on the last 150 years. This book addresses the versions of this argument as presented by Arthur Lovejoy, A.E. Taylor, Kurt Gödel, C.S. Lewis, Norman Malcolm, Karl Popper, J.R. (...)
     
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  41.  2
    More Suttas on Sakka and Why the Shorter Chinese Saṃyukta-Āgama Should Not Be Attributed to the Kāśyapīya School.Marcus Bingenheimer - 2009 - Buddhist Studies Review 26 (2):127-153.
    This article is part of a series on the Shorter Chinese Sa?yukta-?gama. Continuing the investigation from previous research on the provenance of the BZA, it is concluded that the attribution of the BZA to the K??yap?ya school is mistaken. A comparison of the BZA’s?akra-sa?yukta with the P?li Sakka-sa?yutta shows that, with minor exceptions, the narrative content of both sa?yuttas is identical though the number of suttas varies. Finally, the article completes the translation of the?akra-sa?yukta, the first part of which appeared (...)
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  42.  57
    The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.Michelle Alexander & Cornel West - 2010 - The New Press.
    This book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness. Michelle Alexander argues that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control---relegating millions to a permanent second-class status---even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness.
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  43.  62
    Causal Interpretation in Systems of Equations.Jim Woodward - 1999 - Synthese 121 (1-2):199-247.
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  44.  11
    The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology.Jim Stone - 1997 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):495-497.
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  45.  18
    Leaders, Leadership, and Democratization in West Africa: Observations From the Cotton Farmers Movement in Mali. [REVIEW]R. James Bingen - 1996 - Agriculture and Human Values 13 (2):24-32.
    It is widely accepted that the success of rural nongovernmental organizations depends heavily on leadership and the organizational abilities of individual leaders. Drawing on the recent history of the cotton farmers' movement in Mali, this article identifies critical issues related to the development and sustainability of rural leadership. Special attention is given to how both heroic and post-heroic approaches to leadership might be joined in order to help nongovernmental organizations contribute to both political democratization and economic development.
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  46. Postmodern Environmental Ethics: Ethics of Bioregional Narrative.Jim Cheney - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (2):117-134.
    Recent developments in ethics and postmodemist epistemology have set the stage for a reconceptualization of environmental ethics. In this paper, I sketch a path for postmodemism which makes use of certain notions current in contemporary environmentalism. At the center of my thought is the idea of place: (1) place as the context of our lives and the setting in which ethical deliberation takes place; and (2)the epistemological function of place in the construction of our understandings of self, community, and world. (...)
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  47. Why Counterpart Theory and Modal Realism Are Incompatible.Jim Stone - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4):650-653.
    I find a lost wallet containing the owner's address and a lot of cash. Shall I keep it or return it? Suppose I have the ‘liberty of indifference’: whatever I do, I could have done otherwise. Indeed, part of what is meant in saying I act freely is that either way what I do is up to me. And let's allow this liberty requires that my choice is not a logical consequence of the past and natural laws. If I return (...)
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  48. Eco-Feminism and Deep Ecology.Jim Cheney - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (2):115-145.
    l examine the degree to which the so-called “deep ecology” movement embodies a feminist sensibility. In part one I take a brief look at the ambivalent attitude of “eco-feminism” toward deep ecology. In part two I show that this ambivalence sterns largely from the fact that deep ecology assimilates feminist insights to a basically masculine ethical orientation. In part three I discuss some of the ways in which deepecology theory might change if it adopted a fundamentally feminist ethical orientation.
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  49. Evidential Atheism.Jim Stone - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 114 (3):253 - 277.
    Here is a new version of the Evidential Problem of Evil.
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  50. Counterfactuals All the Way Down?: Marc Lange: Laws and Lawmakers: Science, Metaphysics, and the Laws of Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, 280 Pp, $99 HB, $24.95 PB.Jim Woodward, Barry Loewer, John W. Carroll & Marc Lange - 2011 - Metascience 20 (1):27-52.
    Counterfactuals all the way down? Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9437-9 Authors Jim Woodward, History and Philosophy of Science, 1017 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA Barry Loewer, Department of Philosophy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA John W. Carroll, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8103, USA Marc Lange, Department of Philosophy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB#3125—Caldwell Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3125, USA Journal Metascience Online (...)
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