Results for 'Jim Good Jim Garrison'

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  1.  21
    1. Front Matter Front Matter.Jim Good, Jim Garrison, Leemon McHenry, Corey McCall, Susan Dunston, Zach VanderVeen, Melvin L. Rogers, James A. Dunson Iii, Mary Magada-Ward & Michael Sullivan - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):158-170.
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  2.  60
    Dewey, Hegel, and causation.Jim Good Jim Garrison - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):101-120.
    [Cause and effect], if they are distinct, are also identical. Even in ordinary consciousness that identity may be found. We say that a cause is a cause, only when it has an effect, and vice versa. Both cause and effect are thus one and the same content: and the distinction between them is primarily only that the one lays down, and the other is laid down.The Logic of Hegel, Translated from ““The Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences,”” 3rd ed., trans. William (...)
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  3.  84
    Dewey, Hegel, and Causation.Jim Good & Jim Garrison - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):101-120.
    [Cause and effect], if they are distinct, are also identical. Even in ordinary consciousness that identity may be found. We say that a cause is a cause, only when it has an effect, and vice versa. Both cause and effect are thus one and the same content: and the distinction between them is primarily only that the one lays down, and the other is laid down.1In the quote above, Hegel claims that cause and effect are only distinct from a particular (...)
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  4.  31
    Dewey and Eros: Wisdom and Desire in the Art of Teaching.Jim Garrison - 2010 - IAP.
    "We become what we love," states Jim Garrison in Dewey and Eros: Wisdom and Desire in the Art of Teaching. This provocative book represents a major new interpretation of Dewey's education philosophy. It is also an examination of what motivates us to teach and to learn, and begins with the idea of education of eros (i.e., passionate desire)-"the supreme aim of education" as the author puts it-and how that desire results in a practical philosophy that guides us in recognizing (...)
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  5.  20
    John Dewey and Continental Philosophy.Paul Fairfield, James Scott Johnston, Tom Rockmore, James A. Good, Jim Garrison, Barry Allen, Joseph Margolis, Sandra B. Rosenthal, Richard J. Bernstein, David Vessey, C. G. Prado, Colin Koopman, Antonio Calcagno & Inna Semetsky (eds.) - 2010 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    _John Dewey and Continental Philosophy_ provides a rich sampling of exchanges that could have taken place long ago between the traditions of American pragmatism and continental philosophy had the lines of communication been more open between Dewey and his European contemporaries. Since they were not, Paul Fairfield and thirteen of his colleagues seek to remedy the situation by bringing the philosophy of Dewey into conversation with several currents in continental philosophical thought, from post-Kantian idealism and the work of Friedrich Nietzsche (...)
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  6.  9
    Being a Whole Person.S. B. Schneider Jim Garrison - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (7):766-769.
  7.  53
    Postmodernism and Science Education: An Appraisal.Jim Mackenzie, Ron Good & James Robert Brown - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 1057-1086.
    Over the past 50 years, postmodernism has been a progressively growing and influential intellectual movement inside and outside the academy. Postmodernism is characterised by rejection of parts or the whole of the Enlightenment project that had its roots in the birth and embrace of early modern science. While Enlightenment and ‘modernist’ ideas of universalism, of intellectual and cultural progress, of the possibility of finding truths about the natural and social world and of rejection of absolutism and authoritarianism in politics, philosophy (...)
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  8.  36
    America’s First Women Philosophers. [REVIEW]Jim Good - 2007 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 35 (106):66-68.
  9.  34
    Summing up our differences: A reply to Siegel.Jim Garrison - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):229–232.
    This is a brief rejoinder to Harvey Siegel’s ‘Dangerous Dualisms or Murky Monism? A Reply to Jim Garrison’ (35·4), which was itself a critical response to my own recent paper in this journal (33·2). This is an attempt to sum up the key points of the Deweyan pragmatism that I argue for, and hence those that Siegel opposes. It is not an attempt to settle the debate, but rather to clarify our differences.
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  10.  25
    The “permanent deposit” of Hegelian thought in dewey’s theory of inquiry.Jim Garrison - 2006 - Educational Theory 56 (1):1-37.
    In this essay, Jim Garrison explores the emerging scholarship establishing a Hegelian continuity in John Dewey’s thought from his earliest publications to the work published in the last decade of his life. The primary goals of this study are, first, to introduce this new scholarship to philosophers of education and, second, to extend this analysis to new domains, including Dewey’s theory of inquiry, universals, and creative action. Ultimately, Garrison’s analysis also refutes the traditional account that claims that William (...)
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  11.  59
    The Myth that Dewey Accepts “the Myth of the Given”.Jim Garrison - 2019 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 55 (3):304-325.
    Having taken the linguistic turn, neo-pragmatists eschew "experience." Prominent among them are Richard Rorty and Robert Brandom who admire Wilfrid Sellars's critique of the Myth of the Given. Brandom affirms, "I have by and large followed my teacher [Rorty] in rejecting the notion of experience as too burdened by noxious baggage—in particular, by the Myth of the Given—to be worth trying to recruit for serious explanatory and expressive work in philosophy".2 My paper removes the burden supposedly imposed by the myth (...)
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  12.  27
    Refurbishing learning via complexity theory: Buddhist co-origination meets pragmatic transactionalism.Jim Garrison - 2024 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 56 (5):420-428.
    Hager and Beckett assert that a ‘characteristic feature of … assorted co-present groups is that their processes and outputs are marked by the full gamut of human experiences involved in their functioning’. My paper endorses and further develops this claim. I begin by expanding on their emphasis upon the priority of relations in terms of Dewey and Bentley’s transactionalism and Buddhist dependent co-origination and emptiness. Next, I emphasize the importance of embodied perspectives in acquiring meaning and transforming the world. Here, (...)
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  13.  11
    Summing Up Our Differences: A Reply to Siegel.Jim Garrison - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):229-232.
    This is a brief rejoinder to Harvey Siegel’s ‘Dangerous Dualisms or Murky Monism? A Reply to Jim Garrison’ (35·4), which was itself a critical response to my own recent paper in this journal (33·2). This is an attempt to sum up the key points of the Deweyan pragmatism that I argue for, and hence those that Siegel opposes. It is not an attempt to settle the debate, but rather to clarify our differences.
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  14.  91
    Dewey's philosophy and the experience of working: Labor, tools and language.Jim Garrison - 1995 - Synthese 105 (1):87 - 114.
    Although Richard Rorty has done much to renew interest in the philosophy of John Dewey, he nonetheless rejects two of the most important components of Dewey's philosophy, that is, his metaphysics and epistemology. Following George Santayana, Rorty accuses Dewey of trying to serve Locke and Hegel, an impossibility as Rorty rightly sees it. Rorty (1982) says that Dewey should have been Hegelian all the way (p. 85). By reconstructing a bit of Hegel's early philosophy of work, and comparing it to (...)
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  15.  30
    An alternative to Von Glasersfeld's subjectivism in science education: Deweyan social constructivism.Jim Garrison - 1997 - Science & Education 6 (6):543-554.
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  16. John Dewey's philosophy as education.Jim Garrison - 1998 - In Larry A. Hickman (ed.), Reading Dewey: Interpretations for a Postmodern Generation. Indiana University Press. pp. 63--81.
     
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  17. The New Scholarship on Dewey.Jim Garrison - 1996 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 32 (3):469-477.
     
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  18.  20
    A Pragmatist Approach to Emotional Expression and the Construction of Gender Identity.Jim Garrison - 2008 - In Reconstructing Democracy, Recontextualizing Dewey: Pragmatism and Interactive Constructivism in the Twenty-First Century. State University of New York Press. pp. 157-184.
  19.  30
    Curriculum, Critical Common-Sensism, Scholasticism, and the Growth of Democratic Character.Jim Garrison - 2005 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (3):179-211.
    My paper concentrates on Peirce’s late essay, “Issues of Pragmaticism,” which identifies “critical common-sensism” and Scotistic realism as the two primary products of pragmaticism. I argue that the doctrines of Peirce’s critical common-sensism provide a host of commendable curricular objectives for democratic Bildung. The second half of my paper explores Peirce’s Scotistic realism. I argue that Peirce eventually returned to Aristotelian intuitions that led him to a more robust realism. I focus on the development of signs from the vague and (...)
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  20.  14
    Dangerous Dualisms in Siegel’s Theory of Critical Thinking: A Deweyan Pragmatist Responds.Jim Garrison - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (2):213-232.
    Harvey Siegel’s conception of critical thinking is riddled with unnecessary and confusing dualisms. He rigidly separates ‘critical skill’ and ‘critical spirit’, the philosophical and the causal, ‘is’ and ‘ought’, and the moral and the epistemological. These dualisms are easily traced to his desire to defend an absolutist and decontextualised epistemology. To the Deweyan naturalist these dualisms are unnecessary. Appealing to the pragmatist notion of beliefs as embodied habits of action evincing emotion, I show how language, meanings and the mind, including (...)
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  21.  23
    Dewey, Derrida, and ‘the Double Bind’.Jim Garrison - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (3):349-362.
  22.  2
    Responding to the Bottomlessness of Human Being.Jim Garrison - 2003 - Philosophy of Education 59:423-431.
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  23.  34
    Philosophy as education.Jim Garrison - 2006 - In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 391-406.
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  24.  15
    John Dewey's Theory of Practical Reasoning.Jim Garrison - 1999 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 31 (3):291-312.
  25.  77
    Dewey's constructivism : From the reflex arc concept to social constructivism.Jim Garrison - 2009 - In Larry A. Hickman, Stefan Neubert & Kersten Reich (eds.), John Dewey between pragmatism and constructivism. New York: Fordham University Press.
    This chapter presents a constructivist reading of Dewey's work by establishing a line of development between Dewey's 1896 essay on the reflex arc and the social constructivism explicit in his later works. It demonstrates the relevance of classical Pragmatism to current issues in the philosophy of education, highlighting key theoretical and conceptual components of the cultural construction of meanings, truth claims, and identities. It also looks into Dewey's short essay “Knowledge and Speech Reaction” to identify the connection between speech acts, (...)
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  26.  12
    Dewey, Eros and Education.Jim Garrison - 1994 - Education and Culture 11 (2):2.
  27.  53
    John Dewey, Jacques Derrida, and the Metaphysics of Presence.Jim Garrison - 1999 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 35 (2):346 - 372.
  28.  9
    Foucault, Dewey, and Self‐creation.Jim Garrison - 1998 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (2):111-134.
  29.  16
    Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Skepticism: A Response to Saito.Jim Garrison - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):100-103.
    walt whitman writes: “The Americans of all nations at any time upon the earth have probably the fullest poetical nature”. Naoko Saito is an American philosopher and something of a Whitmanesque philosophical poet. Saito’s book is “the product of many years spent reading and studying American philosophy”. She further indicates: “Mostly I have done this from a remote part of the world—far from America across the Pacific Ocean—and, like so many others, in a language that is not my own”. Saito (...)
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  30.  43
    Pragmatism and Education.Jim Garrison & Alven Neiman - 2002 - In Nigel Blake, Paul Smeyers, Richard D. Smith & Paul Standish (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Education. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 19–37.
    This chapter contains sections titled: I II.
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  31.  34
    Reconstructing Democracy, Recontextualizing Dewey: Pragmatism and Interactive Constructivism in the Twenty-First Century.Jim Garrison (ed.) - 2008 - State University of New York Press.
  32.  57
    John Dewey's theory of practical reasoning.Jim Garrison - 1999 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 31 (3):291–312.
  33.  11
    Reflections on Whitman, Dewey, and Educational Reform.Jim Garrison & Elaine J. O'Quinn - 2006 - Education and Culture 20 (2):6.
  34.  54
    Dangerous Dualisms in Siegel’s Theory of Critical Thinking: A Deweyan Pragmatist Responds.Jim Garrison - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (2):213–232.
    Harvey Siegel’s conception of critical thinking is riddled with unnecessary and confusing dualisms. He rigidly separates ‘critical skill’ and ‘critical spirit’, the philosophical and the causal, ‘is’ and ‘ought’, and the moral and the epistemological. These dualisms are easily traced to his desire to defend an absolutist and decontextualised epistemology. To the Deweyan naturalist these dualisms are unnecessary. Appealing to the pragmatist notion of beliefs as embodied habits of action evincing emotion, I show how language, meanings and the mind, including (...)
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  35.  8
    In our globalizing world, issues of pluralism, the Other, and democracy are of immense concern. In the dawn of the twenty-first century, we most.Jim Garrison - 2012 - In Judith M. Green, Stefan Neubert & Kersten Reich (eds.), Pragmatism and diversity: Dewey in the context of late twentieth century debates. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 99.
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  36.  72
    Foucault, Dewey, and Self‐creation.Jim Garrison - 1998 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (2):111–134.
  37.  36
    Introduction: Education and the New Scholarship on John Dewey.Jim Garrison - 1995 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 13 (3):169-174.
  38.  29
    The Role of Mimesis in Dewey's Theory of Qualitative Thought.Jim Garrison - 1999 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 35 (4):678 - 696.
  39.  6
    Being Twice-Born.Jim Garrison - 2007 - Philosophy of Education 63:404-407.
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  40.  5
    Dewey’s Spiritual Response to the Crisis of Late Modernity and Early Postmodernity.Jim Garrison - 2010 - Philosophy of Education 66:289-296.
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  41.  27
    Exploring "The Vital Depths of Experience": A Reader's Response to Henning.Jim Garrison - 2024 - The Pluralist 19 (1):90-94.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Exploring "The Vital Depths of Experience":A Reader's Response to HenningJim Garrisonbethany henning's dewey and the aesthetic unconscious is a much-needed and marvelous book. It explores the pragmatic unconscious as it reveals itself in the qualitative unity of artistic expression integrated with aesthetic appreciation and response. By illuminating the role of often unconscious impulses, feelings, desires, memories, imaginaries, habits, meanings, and more, that goes into creating or appreciating a work (...)
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  42.  51
    Dewey's Theory of Emotions: The Unity of Thought and Emotion in Naturalistic Functional "Co-Ordination" of Behavior.Jim Garrison - 2003 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 39 (3):405 - 443.
  43.  12
    Reconstructing Democracy, Recontextualizing Dewey: Pragmatism and Interactive Constructivism in the Twenty-First Century.Jim Garrison (ed.) - 2008 - State University of New York Press.
  44. Philosophy as Education.Jim Garrison - 2006 - In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 317–322.
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  45.  18
    Editor's Comment.Jim Garrison - 1947 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 5 (3):283-283.
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  46.  21
    Dewey and the Given.Jim Garrison - 2022 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 57 (3):353-373.
  47.  12
    Deweyan Transactionalism in Education: Beyond Self-Action and Inter-Action.Jim Garrison, Johan Öhman & Leif Östman (eds.) - 2022 - Bloomsbury.
    Philosophers of education are largely unaware of Dewey's concept of transactionalism, yet it is implicit in much of his philosophy, educational or otherwise from the late 1890s onwards. Written by scholars from Belgium, Italy, Norway, Sweden, and the USA, this book shows how transactionalism can offer an entirely new way of understanding teaching and learning, the sociocultural dimension of education, and educational research. The contributors show how the concept helps us to see beyond an array of false dualisms, such as (...)
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  48.  85
    Dewey, Derrida, and 'the double bind'.Jim Garrison - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (3):349–362.
  49.  8
    Reconstructing Democracy and Recontextualizing Deweyan Pragmatism.Jim Garrison - 2008 - In Reconstructing Democracy, Recontextualizing Dewey: Pragmatism and Interactive Constructivism in the Twenty-First Century. State University of New York Press. pp. 1-17.
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  50. 18 Ethical Obligation in Caring for the Other.Jim Garrison - 2008 - In Denise Egéa-Kuehne (ed.), Levinas and education: at the intersection of faith and reason. New York: Routledge. pp. 18--272.
     
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