Results for 'Jim Hanson'

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  1.  35
    Searching for the Power–I: Nietzsche and Nirvana.Jim Hanson - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (3):231 – 244.
    _The usual approach in Buddhist-Western writings uses Buddhist perspectives to help answer Western philosophical-psychological questions. This paper reverses the process and uses the Western philosophical perspective of Nietzsche to answer questions of Buddhist-conceived nirvana. Nietzsche's philosophy of will, expounded primarily through the Zarathustra essays, provides an active and affirmative alternative for understanding and attaining nirvana. His ideas of free will and will to power have commonalities with Buddhist practice and thought, including nonattachment, nihilism, no-self, and meditation. Nietzschean will revises the (...)
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  2.  18
    Searching for the High-I.Jim Hanson - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (3):247 – 264.
    This paper questions the nature and existence of the ego and I from a Western and Eastern viewpoint, which has been a question for 2,500 years when the Buddha rejected the Brahman idea of ātman. The answer for an ego depends partly on the state of consciousness; the existence of the Western objectifying ego is undeniable in ordinary consciousness, but not in extraordinary consciousness with no objectifying. The subtle question remains about the existence of an I that is distinct from (...)
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  3.  22
    The Hanson-Hughes Debate on “The Crack of a Future Dawn.”.Robin Hanson - 2007 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 16 (1):99-126.
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  4.  3
    Perception and Discovery: An Introduction to Scientific Inquiry.Norwood Russell Hanson - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    We have been discussing some of the fundamental features of the classical calculus of probability. The equiprobability of rival events was seen to be a major assumption of the calculus. Moreover, it is an assumption which the pure mathematician need not bother to justify. He need only present his formal system as follows.
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  5.  1
    Hanson's Gambling Save Science?: Reply.Robin Hanson - 1995 - Social Epistemology 9 (1):45-45.
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  6. The Concept of Logical Consequence.William H. Hanson - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (3):365-409.
    In the first section, I consider what several logicians say informally about the notion of logical consequence. There is significant variation among these accounts, they are sometimes poorly explained, and some of them are clearly at odds with the usual technical definition. In the second section, I first argue that a certain kind of informal account—one that includes elements of necessity, generality, and apriority—is approximately correct. Next I refine this account and consider several important questions about it, including the appropriate (...)
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  7.  10
    The Concept of Logical Consequence.William H. Hanson - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (3):365-409.
    In the first section, I consider what several logicians say informally about the notion of logical consequence. There is significant variation among these accounts, they are sometimes poorly explained, and some of them are clearly at odds with the usual technical definition. In the second section, I first argue that a certain kind of informal account—one that includes elements of necessity, generality, and apriority—is approximately correct. Next I refine this account and consider several important questions about it, including the appropriate (...)
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  8. Patterns of Discovery: An Inquiry Into the Conceptual Foundations of Science.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1958 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this 1958 book, Professor Hanson turns to an equally important but comparatively neglected subject, the philosophical aspects of research and discovery.
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  9. Marking the Land: Jim Dow in North Dakota.Jim Dow & Laurel Reuter - 2007 - Center for American Places.
  10.  69
    Letter From President Jim Campbell on the State of the Society.Jim Campbell - 2009 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):4-4.
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  11.  42
    The Formal-Structural View of Logical Consequence: A Reply to Gila Sher.William H. Hanson - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):243-258.
    In a recent discussion article in this journal, Gila Sher responds to some of my criticisms of her work on what she calls the formal-structural account of logical consequence. In the present paper I reply and attempt to advance the discussion in a constructive way. Unfortunately, Sher seems to have not fully understood my 1997. Several of the defenses she mounts in her 2001 are aimed at views I do not hold and did not advance in my 1997. Most prominent (...)
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  12. What is a Mechanism? A Counterfactual Account.Jim Woodward - 2002 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2002 (3):S366-S377.
    This paper presents a counterfactual account of what a mechanism is. Mechanisms consist of parts, the behavior of which conforms to generalizations that are invariant under interventions, and which are modular in the sense that it is possible in principle to change the behavior of one part independently of the others. Each of these features can be captured by the truth of certain counterfactuals.
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  13.  25
    The Formal-Structural View of Logical Consequence: A Reply to Gila Sher.William H. Hanson - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):243-258.
    In a recent discussion article in this journal, Gila Sher responds to some of my criticisms of her work on what she calls the formal-structural account of logical consequence. In the present paper I reply and attempt to advance the discussion in a constructive way. Unfortunately, Sher seems to have not fully understood my 1997. Several of the defenses she mounts in her 2001 are aimed at views I do not hold and did not advance in my 1997. Most prominent (...)
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  14.  27
    Aronszajn Trees, Square Principles, and Stationary Reflection.Chris Lambie-Hanson - 2017 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 63 (3-4):265-281.
    We investigate questions involving Aronszajn trees, square principles, and stationary reflection. We first consider two strengthenings of math formula introduced by Brodsky and Rinot for the purpose of constructing κ-Souslin trees. Answering a question of Rinot, we prove that the weaker of these strengthenings is compatible with stationary reflection at κ but the stronger is not. We then prove that, if μ is a singular cardinal, math formula implies the existence of a special math formula-tree with a cf-ascent path, thus (...)
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  15.  86
    Response to Strevens.Jim Woodward - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (1):193-212.
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  16.  30
    At the Limits of Religion Without Religion: A Problem That Cannot Be Resolved.Jeffrey A. Hanson - 2009 - Philosophy Today 53 (2):137-147.
  17. In Memory of Norwood Russell Hanson Proceedings of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science, 1964-1966.R. S. Cohen, Norwood Russell Hanson & Marx W. Wartofsky - 1967 - Reidel.
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  18. Beyond the Edge of Certainty Essays in Contemporary Science and Philosophy [by] Norwood Russell Hanson [and Others]. --.Robert Garland Colodny & Norwood Russell Hanson - 1965 - Prentice-Hall.
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  19.  1
    Perception and Discovery an Introduction to Scientific Inquiry.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1969 - Freeman, Cooper.
    Norwood Russell Hanson was one of the most important philosophers of science of the post-war period. Hanson brought Wittgensteinian ordinary language philosophy to bear on the concepts of science, and his treatments of observation, discovery, and the theory-ladenness of scientific facts remain central to the philosophy of science. Additionally, Hanson was one of philosophy’s great personalities, and his sense of humor and charm come through fully in the pages of Perception and Discovery. Perception and Discovery, originally published (...)
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  20.  17
    Normative Social Role Concepts in Early Childhood.Emily Foster‐Hanson & Marjorie Rhodes - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (8).
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  21. Regularities and Causality; Generalizations and Causal Explanations.Jim Bogen - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (2):397-420.
    Machamer, Darden, and Craver argue that causal explanations explain effects by describing the operations of the mechanisms which produce them. One of this paper’s aims is to take advantage of neglected resources of Mechanism to rethink the traditional idea that actual or counterfactual natural regularities are essential to the distinction between causal and non-causal co-occurrences, and that generalizations describing natural regularities are essential components of causal explanations. I think that causal productivity and regularity are by no means the same thing, (...)
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  22.  30
    Explanation in Psychology: Functional Support for Anomalous Monism: Jim Edwards.Jim Edwards - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:45-64.
    Donald Davidson finds folk-psychological explanations anomalous due to the open-ended and constitutive conception of rationality which they employ, and yet monist because they invoke an ontology of only physical events. An eliminative materialist who thinks that the beliefs and desires of folk-psychology are mere pre-scientific fictions cannot accept these claims, but he could accept anomalous monism construed as an analysis, merely, of the ideological and ontological presumptions of folk-psychology. Of course, eliminative materialism is itself only a guess, a marker for (...)
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  23.  76
    Analysing Causality: The Opposite of Counterfactual is Factual.Jim Bogen - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 18 (1):3 – 26.
    Using Jim Woodward's Counterfactual Dependency account as an example, I argue that causal claims about indeterministic systems cannot be satisfactorily analysed as including counterfactual conditionals among their truth conditions because the counterfactuals such accounts must appeal to need not have truth values. Where this happens, counterfactual analyses transform true causal claims into expressions which are not true.
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  24.  8
    Squares, Ascent Paths, and Chain Conditions.Chris Lambie-Hanson & Philipp Lücke - 2018 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 83 (4):1512-1538.
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  25.  16
    Squares and Covering Matrices.Chris Lambie-Hanson - 2014 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 165 (2):673-694.
    Viale introduced covering matrices in his proof that SCH follows from PFA. In the course of the proof and subsequent work with Sharon, he isolated two reflection principles, CP and S, which, under certain circumstances, are satisfied by all covering matrices of a certain shape. Using square sequences, we construct covering matrices for which CP and S fail. This leads naturally to an investigation of square principles intermediate between □κ and □ for a regular cardinal κ. We provide a detailed (...)
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  26. Why Counterpart Theory and Four-Dimensionalism Are Incompatible.Jim Stone - 2005 - Analysis 65 (4):329-333.
  27.  27
    The Demands of Loyalty.Karen Hanson - 1986 - Idealistic Studies 16 (3):195-204.
    Organizational demands for loyalty often profit from a certain vagueness. This profit is probably a product of both nature and design.
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  28. The Moral Self and Moral Duties.Jim A. C. Everett, Joshua August Skorburg & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Philosophical Psychology (7):1-22.
    Recent research has begun treating the perennial philosophical question, “what makes a person the same over time?” as an empirical question. A long tradition in philosophy holds that psychological continuity and connectedness of memories are at the heart of personal identity. More recent experimental work, following Strohminger & Nichols (2014), has suggested that persistence of moral character, more than memories, is perceived as essential for personal identity. While there is a growing body of evidence supporting these findings, a critique by (...)
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  29. Causally Productive Activities.Jim Bogen - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):112-123.
    This paper suggests and discusses an answer to the following question: What distinguishes causal from non-causal or coincidental co-occurrences? The answer derives from Elizabeth Anscombe’s idea that causality is a highly abstract concept whose meaning derives from our understanding of specific causally productive activities, and from her rejection of the assumption that causality can be informatively understood in terms of actual or counterfactual regularities.Keywords: Elizabeth Anscombe; Causality; Explanation; Inhibition.
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  30.  99
    E-Sports Are Not Sports.Jim Parry - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):3-18.
    The conclusion of this paper will be that e-sports are not sports. I begin by offering a stipulation and a definition. I stipulate that what I have in mind, when thinking about the concept of sport, is ‘Olympic’ sport. And I define an Olympic Sport as an institutionalised, rule-governed contest of human physical skill. The justification for the stipulation lies partly in that it is uncontroversial. Whatever else people might think of as sport, no-one denies that Olympic Sport is sport. (...)
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  31.  6
    Knaster and Friends II: The C-Sequence Number.Chris Lambie-Hanson & Assaf Rinot - 2020 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 21 (1):2150002.
    Motivated by a characterization of weakly compact cardinals due to Todorcevic, we introduce a new cardinal characteristic, the C-sequence number, which can be seen as a measure of the compactness of a regular uncountable cardinal. We prove a number of ZFC and independence results about the C-sequence number and its relationship with large cardinals, stationary reflection, and square principles. We then introduce and study the more general C-sequence spectrum and uncover some tight connections between the C-sequence spectrum and the strong (...)
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  32.  18
    Inference of Trustworthiness From Intuitive Moral Judgments.Jim A. C. Everett, David A. Pizarro & M. J. Crockett - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (6):772-787.
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  33. Why Potentiality Matters.Jim Stone - 1987 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):815-829.
    Do fetuses have a right to life in virtue of the fact that they are potential adult human beings? I take the claim that the fetus is a potential adult human being to come to this: if the fetus grows normally there will be an adult human animal that was once the fetus. Does this fact ground a claim to our care and protection? A great deal hangs on the answer to this question. The actual mental and physical capacities of (...)
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  34. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science in Memory of Norwood Russell Hanson Proceedings of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science, 1964-1966.Norwood Russell Hanson, R. S. Cohen & Marx W. Wartofsky - 1967
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  35. Theory and Observation in Science.Jim Bogen - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Scientists obtain a great deal of the evidence they use by observingnatural and experimentally generated objects and effects. Much of thestandard philosophical literature on this subject comes from20th century logical positivists and empiricists, theirfollowers, and critics who embraced their issues and accepted some oftheir assumptions even as they objected to specific views. Theirdiscussions of observational evidence tend to focus on epistemologicalquestions about its role in theory testing. This entry follows theirlead even though observational evidence also plays important andphilosophically interesting roles (...)
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  36. Contextualism and Warranted Assertion.Jim Stone - 2007 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):92–113.
    Contextualists offer "high-low standards" practical cases to show that a variety of knowledge standards are in play in different ordinary contexts. These cases show nothing of the sort, I maintain. However Keith DeRose gives an ingenious argument that standards for knowledge do go up in high-stakes cases. According to the knowledge account of assertion (Kn), only knowledge warrants assertion. Kn combined with the context sensitivity of assertability yields contextualism about knowledge. But is Kn correct? I offer a rival account of (...)
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  37.  40
    A Tragedy of the Commons: Interpreting the Replication Crisis in Psychology as a Social Dilemma for Early-Career Researchers.Jim A. C. Everett & Brian D. Earp - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  38.  6
    Paired Courses: Using Liberal Arts to Improve Business Education.Eric Litton & Jim Wacker - 2020 - Humanistic Management Journal 5 (2):231-249.
    This paper summarizes paired courses, a technique that is being used to incorporate the benefits of liberal arts into the business curriculum. This technique pairs a required business course with a liberal arts course that students take concurrently during a semester. The courses have overlapping themes and activities to build specific competencies that are desired by organizations, such as communication, critical thinking and problem solving, emotional intelligence, and organizational professionalism. These competencies are identified by exploring national surveys and conducting a (...)
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  39.  17
    The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology.Jim Stone - 1997 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):495-497.
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  40. Why There Still Are No People.Jim Stone - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):174-191.
    This paper argues that there are no people. If identity isn't what matters in survival, psychological connectedness isn't what matters either. Further, fissioning cases do not support the claim that connectedness is what matters. I consider Peter Unger's view that what matters is a continuous physical realization of a core psychology. I conclude that if identity isn't what matters in survival, nothing matters. This conclusion is deployed to argue that there are no people. Objections to Eliminativism are considered, especially that (...)
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  41. Interventionist Theories of Causation in Psychological Perspective.Jim Woodward - 2007 - In Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.), Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press. pp. 19--36.
  42. Why Counterpart Theory and Modal Realism Are Incompatible.Jim Stone - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4):650-653.
    I find a lost wallet containing the owner's address and a lot of cash. Shall I keep it or return it? Suppose I have the ‘liberty of indifference’: whatever I do, I could have done otherwise. Indeed, part of what is meant in saying I act freely is that either way what I do is up to me. And let's allow this liberty requires that my choice is not a logical consequence of the past and natural laws. If I return (...)
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  43.  46
    The “Permanent Deposit” of Hegelian Thought in Dewey’s Theory of Inquiry.Jim Garrison - 2006 - Educational Theory 56 (1):1-37.
    In this essay, Jim Garrison explores the emerging scholarship establishing a Hegelian continuity in John Dewey’s thought from his earliest publications to the work published in the last decade of his life. The primary goals of this study are, first, to introduce this new scholarship to philosophers of education and, second, to extend this analysis to new domains, including Dewey’s theory of inquiry, universals, and creative action. Ultimately, Garrison’s analysis also refutes the traditional account that claims that William James converted (...)
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  44. Postmodern Environmental Ethics: Ethics of Bioregional Narrative.Jim Cheney - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (2):117-134.
    Recent developments in ethics and postmodemist epistemology have set the stage for a reconceptualization of environmental ethics. In this paper, I sketch a path for postmodemism which makes use of certain notions current in contemporary environmentalism. At the center of my thought is the idea of place: (1) place as the context of our lives and the setting in which ethical deliberation takes place; and (2)the epistemological function of place in the construction of our understandings of self, community, and world. (...)
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  45.  17
    Bounded Stationary Reflection II.Chris Lambie-Hanson - 2017 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 168 (1):50-71.
  46. Trumping the Causal Influence Account of Causation.Jim Stone - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 142 (2):153 - 160.
    Here is a simple counterexample to David Lewis’s causal influence account of causation, one that is especially illuminating due to its connection to what Lewis himself writes: it is a variant of his trumping example.
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  47.  20
    Science and the Human Imagination.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1958 - Philosophical Review 67 (4):565.
  48. Eco-Feminism and Deep Ecology.Jim Cheney - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (2):115-145.
    l examine the degree to which the so-called “deep ecology” movement embodies a feminist sensibility. In part one I take a brief look at the ambivalent attitude of “eco-feminism” toward deep ecology. In part two I show that this ambivalence sterns largely from the fact that deep ecology assimilates feminist insights to a basically masculine ethical orientation. In part three I discuss some of the ways in which deepecology theory might change if it adopted a fundamentally feminist ethical orientation.
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  49.  9
    Good and Bad Points in Scales.Chris Lambie-Hanson - 2014 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 53 (7-8):749-777.
    We address three questions raised by Cummings and Foreman regarding a model of Gitik and Sharon. We first analyze the PCF-theoretic structure of the Gitik–Sharon model, determining the extent of good and bad scales. We then classify the bad points of the bad scales existing in both the Gitik–Sharon model and other models containing bad scales. Finally, we investigate the ideal of subsets of singular cardinals of countable cofinality carrying good scales.
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  50.  11
    Hippocrates. On Head Wounds. Edited and Translated with Commentaries by, Maury Hanson. 130 Pp., Bibl., Index. Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 1999. [REVIEW]Ann Ellis Hanson - 2002 - Isis 93 (4):685-686.
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