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Jing Zhu [21]Jingsan Zhu [2]Jingxi Zhu [1]Jingwen Zhu [1]
Jingwu Zhu [1]
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Profile: Jing Zhu (Sun-Yat Sen University)
Profile: Jingsheng Zhu (University of Chicago)
  1.  34
    Reclaiming Volition: An Alternative Interpretation of Libet's Experiment.Jing Zhu - 2003 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (11):61-77.
    Based on his experimental studies, Libet claims that voluntary actions are initiated by unconscious brain activities well before intentions or decisions to act are consciously experienced by people. This account conflicts with our common-sense conception of human agency, in which people consciously and intentionally exert volitions or acts of will to initiate voluntary actions. This paper offers an alternative interpretation of Libet's experiment. The cause of the intentional acts performed by the subjects in Libet's experiment should not be exclusively attributed (...)
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  2. Locating Volition.Jing Zhu - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):302-322.
    In this paper, it is examined how neuroscience can help to understand the nature of volition by addressing the question whether volitions can be localized in the brain. Volitions, as acts of the will, are special mental events or activities by which an agent consciously and actively exercises her agency to voluntarily direct her thoughts and actions. If we can pinpoint when and where volitional events or activities occur in the brain and find out their neural underpinnings, this can substantively (...)
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  3.  75
    Passive Action and Causalism.Jing Zhu - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 119 (3):295-314.
    The first half of this paper is an attemptto conceptualize and understand the paradoxicalnotion of ``passive action''''. The strategy is toconstrue passive action in the context ofemotional behavior, with the purpose toestablish it as a conceivable and conceptuallycoherent category. In the second half of thispaper, the implications of passive action forcausal theories of action are examined. I arguethat Alfred Mele''s defense of causalism isunsuccessful and that causalism may lack theresource to account for passive action.Following Harry Frankfurt, I suggest analternative way (...)
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  4. Understanding Volition.Jing Zhu - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):247-274.
    The concept of volition has a long history in Western thought, but is looked upon unfavorably in contemporary philosophy and psychology. This paper proposes and elaborates a unifying conception of volition, which views volition as a mediating executive mental process that bridges the gaps between an agent's deliberation, decision and voluntary bodily action. Then the paper critically examines three major skeptical arguments against volition: volition is a mystery, volition is an illusion, and volition is a fundamentally flawed conception that leads (...)
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  5. On the Principle of Intention Agglomeration.Jing Zhu - 2010 - Synthese 175 (1):89 - 99.
    In this article, I first elaborate and refine the Principle of Intention Agglomeration (PIA), which was introduced by Michael Bratman as “a natural constraint on intention”. According to the PIA, the intentions of a rational agent should be agglomerative. The proposed refinement of the PIA is not only in accordance with the spirit of Bratman’s planning theory of intention as well as consistency constraints for intentions rooted in the theory, but also reveals some deep rationales of practical rationality regarding resource-limited (...)
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  6. Emotion and Action.Jing Zhu & Paul Thagard - 2002 - Philosophical Psychology 15 (1):19 – 36.
    The role of emotion in human action has long been neglected in the philosophy of action. Some prevalent misconceptions of the nature of emotion are responsible for this neglect: emotions are irrational; emotions are passive; and emotions have only an insignificant impact on actions. In this paper we argue that these assumptions about the nature of emotion are problematic and that the neglect of emotion's place in theories of action is untenable. More positively, we argue on the basis of recent (...)
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  7.  49
    Causalisms Reconsidered.Andrei A. Buckareff & Jing Zhu - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (01):147-.
    We reply to Andrew Sneddon’s recent criticism of the causal theory of action (CTA) and critically examine Sneddon’s preferred alternative, minimal causalism. We show that Sneddon’s criticism of CTA is problematic in several respects, and therefore his conclusion that “the prospects for CTA look poor” is unjustified. Moreover, we show that the minimal causalism that Sneddon advocates looks rather unpromising and its merits that Sneddon mentions are untenable.
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  8. The Primacy of the Mental in the Explanation of Human Action.Andrei A. Buckareff & Jing Zhu - 2008 - Disputatio 3 (26):1 - 16.
  9.  90
    Is Conscious Will an Illusion?Jing Zhu - 2004 - Disputatio 16:59 - 70.
  10.  74
    Intention and Volition.Jing Zhu - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):175 - 193.
  11.  82
    Intentions Are Mental States.Jing Zhu & Andrei A. Buckareff - 2006 - Philosophical Explorations 9 (2):235 – 242.
    Richard Scheer has recently argued against what he calls the 'mental state' theory of intentions. He argues that versions of this theory fail to account for various characteristics of intention. In this essay we reply to Scheer's criticisms and argue that intentions are mental states.
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  12.  30
    Explaining Synchronic Self-Control.Jing Zhu - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):475-492.
  13.  87
    In Defence of Functionalism.Jing Zhu - 2006 - Philosophia 34 (1):95-99.
  14.  57
    Acupuncture, Incommensurability, and Conceptual Change.Paul Thagard & Jing Zhu - unknown
    This paper is an investigation of the degree of incommensurability between Western scientific medicine and traditional Chinese medicine, focusing on the practice and theory of acupuncture. We describe the structure of traditional Chinese medicine, oriented around such concepts as yin, yang, qi, and xing, and discuss how the conceptual and explanatory differences between Western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine generate impediments to their comparison and evaluation. We argue that the linguistic, conceptual, ontological, and explanatory impediments can to a large extent (...)
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  15.  19
    Mental Action and Causalism.Jing Zhu - 2007 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (2):89.
    This paper challenges the causal approach to understanding mental action by developing a pair of cases, both relevant to mental control. Central to the first case is the phenomenon of the ironic effects of mental control: our attempts at exercising control over our own minds can undermine the intended mental control itself. Central to the second case is the seemingly paradoxical notion of "passive mental action." These two cases indicate that the mental antecedents of the right kind specified by a (...)
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  16.  11
    How We Act: Causes, Reasons, and Intentions, by Berent Enç.Jing Zhu - 2005 - Disputatio.
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  17.  19
    How to Make an Effort: A Reply to E. J. Coffman.Jing Zhu - 2004 - Philosophical Papers 33 (1):23-33.
    Abstract In ?On Making an Effort? E. J. Coffman develops what he takes to be a fairly serious problem for Robert Kane's positive theory of free choice, where the concept of efforts of will is pivotal.1 Coffman argues that the plausibility of Kane's libertarian account of free choice ?is inversely proportional to the plausibility of a certain principle of agency? (p. 12). And since the latter is quite plausible, the former is therefore ?at best fairly implausible? (p. 12). In what (...)
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  18.  2
    Managed Care and Hospital Cost Containment.R. Tamara Konetzka, Jingsan Zhu, Julie Sochalski & Kevin G. Volpp - 2008 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (1):98-111.
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  19. Kielan Yarrow, Patrick Haggard, and John C. Rothwell. Action, Arousal, and Subjective Time.David A. Gallo, John G. Seamon, L. Andrew Coward, Ron Sun, Jing Zhu, John F. Kihlstrom, Steven M. Platek, Jaime W. Thomson, Gordon G. Gallup Jr & Jeroen G. W. Raaijmakers - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12:783.
     
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  20. Managed Care and Hospital Cost Containment.R. Tamara Konetzka, Jingsan Zhu, Julie Sochalski & Kevin G. Volpp - 2008 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 45 (1):98-111.
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  21. A Study of the Determination of Grain Boundary Diffusivity and Energy Through the Thermally Grown Oxide Ridges on a Fe-22Cr Alloy Surface.Yu Lin, David E. Laughlin & Jingxi Zhu - forthcoming - Philosophical Magazine:1-14.
  22. Deliberative Libertarianism.Jing Zhu - 2011 - Humana.Mente 15.
     
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  23. Review of How We Act: Causes, Reasons, and Intentions. [REVIEW]Jing Zhu - 2005 - Disputatio 1:277-282.
     
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  24. The Conative Mind: Volition and Action.Jing Zhu - 2003 - Dissertation, University of Waterloo (Canada)
    This work is an attempt to restore volition as a respectable topic for scientific studies. Volition, traditionally conceived as the act of will, has been largely neglected in contemporary science and philosophy. I first develop a volitional theory of action by elaborating a unifying conception of volition, where volitions are construed as special kinds of mental action by which an agent consciously and actively bridge the gaps between deliberation, decision and intentional action. Then I argue that the major skeptical arguments (...)
     
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