29 found
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  1.  18
    Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research.Jing-Bao Nie, Adam Gilbertson, Malcolm de Roubaix, Ciara Staunton, Anton van Niekerk, Joseph D. Tucker & Stuart Rennie - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (10):3-11.
    Military metaphors are pervasive in biomedicine, including HIV research. Rooted in the mind set that regards pathogens as enemies to be defeated, terms such as “shock and kill” have become widely accepted idioms within HIV cure research. Such language and symbolism must be critically examined as they may be especially problematic when used to express scientific ideas within emerging health-related fields. In this article, philosophical analysis and an interdisciplinary literature review utilizing key texts from sociology, anthropology, history, and Chinese and (...)
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  2.  39
    The United States Cover-Up of Japanese Wartime Medical Atrocities: Complicity Committed in the National Interest and Two Proposals for Contemporary Action.Jing-Bao Nie - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (3):W21-W33.
    To monopolize the scientific data gained by Japanese physicians and researchers from vivisections and other barbarous experiments performed on living humans in biological warfare programs such as Unit 731, immediately after the war the United States government secretly granted those involved immunity from war crimes prosecution, withdrew vital information from the International Military Tribunal for the Far East, and publicly denounced otherwise irrefutable evidence from other sources such as the Russian Khabarovsk trial. Acting in “the national interest” and for the (...)
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  3.  13
    U.S. Responses To Japanese Wartime Inhuman Experimentation After World War Ii: National Security and Wartime Exigency.Howard Brody, Sarah E. Leonard, Jing-bao Nie & Paul Weindling - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):220-230.
    In 1945–46, representatives of the U.S. government made similar discoveries in both Germany and Japan, unearthing evidence of unethical experiments on human beings that could be viewed as war crimes. The outcomes in the two defeated nations, however, were strikingly different. In Germany, the United States, influenced by the Canadian physician John Thompson, played a key role in bringing Nazi physicians to trial and publicizing their misdeeds. In Japan, the United States played an equally key role in concealing information about (...)
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  4.  54
    Linking Visions: Feminist Bioethics, Human Rights, and the Developing World.Karen L. Baird, María Julia Bertomeu, Martha Chinouya, Donna Dickenson, Michele Harvey-Blankenship, Barbara Ann Hocking, Laura Duhan Kaplan, Jing-Bao Nie, Eileen O'Keefe, Julia Tao Lai Po-wah, Carol Quinn, Arleen L. F. Salles, K. Shanthi, Susana E. Sommer, Rosemarie Tong & Julie Zilberberg - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection brings together fourteen contributions by authors from around the globe. Each of the contributions engages with questions about how local and global bioethical issues are made to be comparable, in the hope of redressing basic needs and demands for justice. These works demonstrate the significant conceptual contributions that can be made through feminists' attention to debates in a range of interrelated fields, especially as they formulate appropriate responses to developments in medical technology, global economics, population shifts, and poverty.
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  5. Medical Ethics in China: A Transcultural Interpretation.Jing-Bao Nie - 2012 - Routledge.
  6.  25
    No More Militaristic and Violent Language in Medicine: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research”.Jing-Bao Nie, Stuart Rennie, Adam Gilbertson & Joseph D. Tucker - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):9-11.
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  7.  3
    Connecting the East and the West, the Local and the Universal: The Methodological Elements of a Transcultural Approach to Bioethics.Jing-Bao Nie & Ruth P. Fitzgerald - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (3):219-247.
    Contemporary bioethical issues are inherently cross-cultural and global in their scope. This is not surprising, as bioethical matters touch everyone in one way or another. Moral quandaries in health-care, life sciences, and biotechnology do not respect natural and human boundaries, the boundaries between and within nation-states, ethnicities, cultures, communities, and social groups. In addition, the simultaneously large-scale and intimate interactions between and within different cultures and civilizations and the rapid pace at which they change are phenomena that distinguish our times (...)
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  8.  57
    The West's Dismissal of the Khabarovsk Trial as 'Communist Propaganda': Ideology, Evidence and International Bioethics. [REVIEW]Jing-Bao Nie - 2004 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):32-42.
    In late 1949 the former Soviet Union conducted an open trial of eight Japanese physicians and researchers and four other military servicemen in Khabarovsk, a city in eastern Siberia. Despite its strong ideological tone and many obvious shortcomings such as the lack of international participation, the trial established beyond reasonable doubt that the Japanese army had prepared and deployed bacteriological weapons and that Japanese researchers had conducted cruel experiments on living human beings. However, the trial, together with the evidence presented (...)
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  9.  48
    The Plurality of Chinese and American Medical Moralities: Toward an Interpretive Cross-Cultural Bioethics.Jing-Bao Nie - 2000 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (3):239-260.
    : Since the late 1970s, American appraisals of Chinese medical ethics and Chinese responses to American bioethics range from frank criticism to warm appreciation, from refutation to acceptance. Yet in the United States as well as in China, American bioethics and Chinese medical ethics have been seen, respectively, as individualistic and communitarian. In this widely-accepted general comparison, the great variation in the two medical moralities, especially the diversity of Chinese experiences, has been unfortunately minimized, if not totally ignored. Neither American (...)
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  10.  7
    The Benevolent Polity: A Confucian Socio-Ethical Vision of Eldercare.Jing-Bao Nie - 2015 - Asian Bioethics Review 7 (3):260-276.
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  11.  65
    Multiculturalism and Asian Bioethics: Cultural War or Creative Dialogue? [REVIEW]Jing-Bao Nie & Alastair V. Campbell - 2007 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (3):163-167.
  12.  58
    China’s One-Child Policy, a Policy Without a Future.Jing-bao Nie - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):272-287.
    :The Chinese Communist Party government has been forcefully promoting itsjihua shengyu program, known as the “one-child policy,” for more than three decades. A distinctive authoritarian model of population governance has been developed. A pertinent question to be asked is whether China’s one-child policy and the authoritarian model of population governance have a future. The answer must be no; they do not. Although there are many demographic, economic, and social rationales for terminating the one-child policy, the most fundamental reason for opposing (...)
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  13.  92
    The Problem of Coerced Abortion in China and Related Ethical Issues.Jing-bao Nie - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):463-475.
    Since the early 1970s, despite popular opposition, to control the rapid growth of population the Chinese government has been carrying out the strictest and most comprehensive family planning policy in the world. In addition to contraceptive methods and sterilization, artificial abortionhas been used as an important measure of birth control under the policy. Many women have been required, persuaded, and even forced by the authorities to abort fetuses no matter how much they want to give birth.
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  14.  22
    Moving Toward Gender Justice.Anne Donchin, Susan Dodds & Jing-Bao Nie - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):ii-iii.
  15. Challenges Of Japanese Doctors' Human Experimentation In China For East-Asian And Chinese Bioethics: Commentary On Tsuchiya.Jing-bao Nie - 2001 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 11 (1):3-7.
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  16. China's Birth Control Program Through Feminist Lenses.Jing-Bao Nie - 2010 - In Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel Baldwin-Ragaven & Petya Fitzpatrick (eds.), Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  17.  1
    Conflict of Interest in Scientific Research in China: A Socio-Ethical Analysis of He Jiankui’s Human Genome-Editing Experiment.Jing-Bao Nie, Guangkuan Xie, Hua Chen & Yali Cong - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Extensive conflicts of interest at both individual and institutional levels are identifiable in scientific research and healthcare in China, as in many other parts of the world. A prominent new case from China is He Jiankui’s experiment that produced the world’s first gene-edited babies and that raises numerous ethical, political, socio-cultural, and transnational questions. Serious financial and other COI were involved in He’s genetic adventure. Using He’s infamous experiment as a case study, this paper explores the wider issue of financial (...)
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  18.  10
    Confucianism and Organ Donation: Moral Duties From Xiao (Filial Piety) to Ren.Jing-Bao Nie & D. Gareth Jones - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (4):583-591.
    There exists a serious shortage of organs for transplantation in China, more so than in most Western countries. Confucianism has been commonly used as the cultural and ethical reason to explain the reluctance of Chinese and other East-Asian people to donate organs for medical purposes. It is asserted that the Confucian emphasis on xiao requires individuals to ensure body intactness at death. However, based on the original texts of classical Confucianism and other primary materials, we refute this popular view. We (...)
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  19. Let's Never Stop Bashing Inhumanity: A Reply To Frank Leavitt And An Appeal For Further Ethical Studies On Japanese Doctors' Wartime Experimentation.Jing-bao Nie - 2003 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 13 (5):163-166.
     
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  20.  33
    To Set a Gross Distortion Straight: A Reply to Reidar Lie's Book Review of Jing-Bao Nie's Medical Ethics in China: A Transcultural Interpretation (Routledge 2011).Jing-Bao Nie - 2012 - Asian Bioethics Review 4 (4):399-406.
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  21.  3
    Access to Care by Older Rural People in a Post-Reform Chinese Hospital: An Ethical Evaluation of Anthropological Findings.Xiang Zou & Jing-Bao Nie - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (1):57-68.
    This paper examines older people’s access to care experiences in rural China by integrating anthropological investigation with ethical inquiry. Six months of fieldwork in a post-reform primary hospital show how rural residents struggle to access gerontological and nursing care under socially disadvantageous conditions. This anthropological investigation highlights the unmet needs in medical and nursing care for older people, as well as some social, institutional and structural elements that impede access to care. Centring on protecting the vulnerable as informed by feminist (...)
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  22.  15
    Transcultural ADHD and Bioethics: Reformulating a Doubly Dichotomized Debate.Neil Pickering & Jing-Bao Nie - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (3):249-275.
    This paper aims to explore some key methodological issues in comparative and cross-cultural bioethics, through a discussion of a particular example: childhood and adolescent Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.1 At its heart, this paper makes an argument for a transcultural approach to bioethics. The argument starts with the examination of a conceptually mistaken and empirically unsustainable belief that culture is inevitably a force for difference. This “difference presumption” appears in various guises, for example in the belief that West and East have (...)
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  23.  32
    Call for Papers on Bioethics in Asia.Jing-Bao Nie - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (3):205-205.
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  24.  7
    The U.S. Complicity in Japan's Medical War Crimes: A Restatement on Why the U.S. Government Should Apologize and the U.S. Community of Bioethics Should Respond. [REVIEW]Jing-Bao Nie - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (6):50-52.
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  25.  6
    The Human Spirit and Responsive Equilibrium: End of Life Care and Uncertainty.Grant Gillett, Maeve Mcmurdo & Jing-Bao Nie - 2015 - Asian Bioethics Review 7 (3):292-305.
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  26.  13
    Moving Toward Gender Justice.Anne Donchin With Susan Dodds & Jing-bao Nie - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):ii–iii.
  27.  6
    “Human Drugs” in Chinese Medicine and the Confucian View: An Interpretive Study.Jing-Bao Nie - forthcoming - Confucian Bioethics.
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  28.  3
    Editorial Note.Jing-Bao Nie & Ruth Fitzgerald - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (3):ix-xiii.
    Bioethics, as both an academic field and a public discourse on a global scale, has been evolving rapidly over the past several decades. The importance of cross-cultural and global bioethics as a subfield of bioethics is strongly reflected in the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal. Since 1991, KIEJ has published a number of articles and some thematic issues in this area. Among many others, it has facilitated a series of debates in the development of a cross-cultural and international bioethics, including (...)
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  29. A Call For Further Studies On The Ethical Lessons Of Japanese Doctors' Experimentation In Wartime China For Asian And International Bioethics Today.Jing-bao Nie, Takashi Tsuchiya, Hans-Martin Sass & Keiichi Tsuneishi - 2003 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 13 (3):106-107.
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