13 found
Order:
  1.  27
    School Discipline in Moral Disarray.Joan F. Goodman - 2006 - Journal of Moral Education 35 (2):213-230.
    It is argued that current school disciplinary policies are ineffective instruments for delivering moral messages: they are poorly justified; fail to distinguish moral violations (violence, vandalism, deception) from conventional school?limited violations (attendance, dress codes, eating venues), leaving the impression that dress code violations and forgery are equivalent; conflate sanctions, including presumed punishments (detentions and suspensions), with other forms of corrections (parent?conferences, positive and negative reinforcement) and apply them without distinction to moral and non?moral wrongdoing. To be morally instructive school disciplinary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  83
    The Quest for Compliance in Schools: Unforeseen Consequences.Joan F. Goodman & Emily Klim Uzun - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (1):3-17.
    This study investigates the reaction of high school students in an alternative urban secondary school to highly controlling, authoritarian practices. Premised on the published theories, we imagined that students would object to the regime and consider it unduly repressive. Student reactions were elicited through questionnaires and interviews. To our considerable surprise, most respondents approved of the authoritarian regime and disapproved of granting students more self-expression. Most have come to believe that they do not deserve freedom from pervasive rules, for they (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  15
    Searching for Character and the Role of Schools.Joan F. Goodman - 2018 - Ethics and Education 14 (1):15-35.
    ABSTRACTDespite a resurgence of interest in character education, just what ‘character’ means is contested. Two strands, while overlapping, diverge on several questions: Is character centrally about moral qualities or more inclusive? Does it consist of one or multiple traits? Does it regard virtue as independently or instrumentally good? Is character a set of dispositions or behaviors? Is it a matter of reflection and reason or habits and skills? Those aligned with the first part of each dichotomy I label purists, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  17
    Responding to Children's Needs: Amplifying the Caring Ethic.Joan F. Goodman - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):233-248.
    According to care theory the good parent confronting a helpless child has an unmediated impulse to relieve his distress; that impulse grows into a prescriptive ethic of relatedness, often contrasted to the more individualistic ethic of justice. If, however, a child's nature is understood as assertive and competent as well as fragile and dependent; if, in addition, he acquires needs through socialisation and is the beneficiary of inferred needs determined by others, then an ethic of need-gratification is insufficient. Caring theory, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  16
    Students' Choices and Moral Growth.Joan F. Goodman - 2006 - Ethics and Education 1 (2):103-115.
    Can schools encourage children to become independent moral decision-makers, maintaining controlled environments suitable to instructing large numbers of children? Two opposing responses are reviewed: one holds that the road to morality is through discipline and obedience, the other through children's experimentation and choice-making. Circumventing these polarities, I look to distinctions within rules that may help in balancing claims of restraint and freedom. Using a pharmacological analogy, one might, in principle, justify ‘pills’ for uncontrollable and/or morally trivial behaviors, but not for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  39
    Respect-Due and Respect-Earned: Negotiating Student–Teacher Relationships.Joan F. Goodman - 2009 - Ethics and Education 4 (1):3-17.
    Respect is a cardinal virtue in schools and foundational to our common ethical beliefs, yet its meaning is muddled. For philosophers Kant, Mill, and Rawls, whose influential theories span three centuries, respect includes appreciation of universal human dignity, equality, and autonomy. In their view children, possessors of human dignity, but without perspective and reasoning ability, are entitled only to the most minimal respect. While undeserving of mutual respect they are nonetheless expected to show unilateral respect. Dewey and Piaget, scions of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  23
    Student Agency: Success, Failure, and Lessons Learned.Joan F. Goodman & Nimet Suheyla Eren - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (2):123-139.
    Students in urban under-resourced schools are often disengaged from the curriculum. Distributing voice to them would seem an obvious counter to their alienation, allowing them to be co-constructors rather than objects of their education. Beyond being pragmatically sound, student agency is, arguably, a psychological and moral imperative. However, what is imperative is not necessarily doable as we illustrate in two student agency high school projects. We analyze the outcomes using four previously identified factors: school context, project scope, personal gratification, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  24
    Suppression of the Aggressive Impulse: Conceptual Difficulties in Anti-Violence Programs.Erika Kitzmiller & Joan F. Goodman - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (2):117-134.
    School anti-violence programs are united in their radical condemnation of aggression, generally equated with violence. The programs advocate its elimination by priming children's emotional and cognitive controls. What goes unrecognized is the embeddedness of aggression in human beings, as well as its positive psychological and moral functions. In attempting to eradicate aggression, schools increase the risk of student disaffection while stifling the goods associated with it: status, power, dominance, agency, mastery, pride, social-affiliation, social-approval, loyalty, self-respect, and self-confidence. It is argued (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  19
    School Discipline, Buy-in and Belief.Joan F. Goodman - 2007 - Ethics and Education 2 (1):3-23.
    It is generally acknowledged that school discipline is failing. Through a comparison of two very different disciplinary situations, I inquire into possible causes of failure and conditions of success. The argument is made that if discipline is to succeed, students must believe in and identify with the goals it is designed to support. Questions are raised as to just how embracing (pervasive throughout school life), lofty (transcending the classroom), and moralized (emphasizing social over personal) such goals should be. Without specifying (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  15
    The Cheating Culture.Joan F. Goodman - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):305-305.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  7
    Niceness and the Limits of Rules.Joan F. Goodman - 2001 - Journal of Moral Education 30 (4):349-360.
    Teachers (and parents), responsible for the acculturation of young children, have an investment in "niceness". While the moral worthiness of this norm is obvious, niceness when enshrined as a set of rules is questionable. Because we want children to be honest, strong-minded and bold, to resist peer pressure and speak out against wrongdoing, protection against hurt must sometimes give way to other priorities. Through the presentation of two early childhood scenarios - a small child asks questions of strangers that insult (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  10
    Moral Descriptors and the Assessment of Children.Joan F. Goodman - 1998 - Journal of Moral Education 27 (4):475-487.
    Abstract In the world outside schools, the public clamours for more character education; inside schools, psychologists, responsible for evaluating children, neither assess the moral domain nor use moral terminology to describe children. There are powerful reasons to resist the reintroduction of moral language into psychological assessments: such inclusion could promote invidious labelling, burden children with shame and guilt and open the diagnostic system to increased subjectivity, capriciousness and stigmatization??the substitution of ?illness? for what is mere social and cultural difference. Despite (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  6
    The Interpretation of Children's Needs at Home and in School.Joan F. Goodman - 2008 - Ethics and Education 3 (1):27-40.
    Statements of need are used promiscuously by caretakers and children. The term may refer to mere wants (desire), to wants that have become socialized into secondary needs, to needs inferred by adults based on interpretations of future adaptive requirements, as well as to fundamental needs required for a child's well-being. It is important to distinguish the various uses of the term, first, because need carries an imperative-it would be unethical to frustrate a child's basic needs. Second, when confounding meanings, there (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark