8 found
Order:
  1.  9
    Functional Significance of the Affiliative Smile.Joan S. Lockard, Renate I. Mcvittie & Lisa M. Isaac - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (5):367-370.
  2.  21
    Monetary Significance of the Affiliative Smile: A Case for Reciprocal Altruism.Kathi L. Tidd & Joan S. Lockard - 1978 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (6):344-346.
  3.  17
    Cost-Benefit Indexes of Deception in Nonviolent Crime.Joan S. Lockard, Barbara C. Kirkevold & Douglas F. Kalk - 1980 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (4):303-306.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  21
    Hitchhiking: Social Signals at a Distance.Charles J. Morgan, Joan S. Lockard, Carol E. Fahrenbruch & Jerry L. Smith - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (6):459-461.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  12
    Influences of Anatomical Differences on Gender-Specific Book-Carrying Behavior.Judith D. Scheman, Joan S. Lockard & Bruce L. Mehler - 1978 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (1):17-20.
    Book-carrying styles of 1,133 school-age children (kindergarten through high school) were observed, and anatomical measurements (hips, waist, and underarm) of the space between the trunk and fall line of the arm in 735 of the students was recorded. With the exception of handedness, the results replicated those of earlier studies of sexual differences in bookcarrying styles and implicated the protrusion of female hips as instrumental in this phenomenon.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  9
    Peripheral Males: A Primate Model for a Human Subgroup.Joan S. Lockard & Robert M. Adams - 1980 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (5):295-298.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  13
    Distal Versus Proximal Mechanisms of “Real” Self-Deception.Joan S. Lockard - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):120-121.
    There is little fear that the concept of motivational bias as proposed by Mele is likely to dampen the current academic ferment (see Mele's Introduction) with respect to self-deception for several reasons: (a) like philosophy, science has more recently abandoned the heuristic of a rational human mind; (b) the concept is parsimonious, applicable to many research topics other than self-deception, and, therefore, scientifically serviceable; (c) as a proximal mechanism it addresses process rather than function, that is, how rather than why (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  3
    Speculations on the Adaptive Significance of Cognition and Consciousness in Nonhuman Species.Joan S. Lockard - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):583-584.