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  1. Vulnerability of" Virtual" Subjects: Childhood, Memory, and Crisis in the Cultural Value of Innocence.Joanne Faulkner - 2013 - Substance 42 (3):127-147.
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  2.  11
    Innocence, Evil, and Human Frailty: Potentiality and the Child in the Writings of Giorgio Agamben.Joanne Faulkner - 2010 - Angelaki 15 (2):203-219.
    With his concept of ‘potentiality,’ Agamben offers a promising means of approaching questions of power and agency. Yet arguably, by situating potentiality as a reserve created through the sovereign ban, Agamben neglects the inter-subjective context of ordinary everyday agency. This means that while Agamben’s theory is particularly well suited to the analysis of interactions between states and their citizens, and those excluded from citizenship, it provides poor tools for understanding how social disparity develops within communities, understood as networks of individuals (...)
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  3.  22
    Innocence, Evil, and Human Frailty.Joanne Faulkner - 2010 - Angelaki 15 (2):203-219.
  4.  5
    Negotiating Vulnerability Through “Animal” and “Child” Agamben and Rancière at the Limit of Being Human.Joanne Faulkner - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (4):73-85.
  5.  9
    Innocents and Oracles: The Child as a Figure of Knowledge and Critique in the Middle-Class Philosophical Imagination.Joanne Faulkner - 2011 - Critical Horizons 12 (3):323 - 346.
    This paper argues that the figure of the child performs a critical function for the middle-class social imaginary, representing both an essential “innocence” of the liberal individual, and an excluded, unconscious remainder of its project of control through the management of knowledge. While childhood is invested with affect and value, children’s agency and opportunities for social participation are restricted insofar as they are seen both to represent an elementary humanity and to fall short of full rationality, citizenship and identity. The (...)
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  6.  9
    Negotiating Vulnerability Through “Animal” and “Child”.Joanne Faulkner - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (4):73 - 85.
    Angelaki, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 73-85, December 2011.
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  7.  48
    Freud's Concept Of The Death Drive And Its Relation To The Superego.Joanne Faulkner - 2005 - Minerva 9:153-176.
    This paper addresses the emergence of the ‘death drive’ in Sigmund Freud’s later work, and thesignificance of this development for his psychoanalytic theory as a whole. In particular, the paper arguesthat the ‘death drive’ is a pivotal concept, articulating a connection between what are commonlyunderstood as the ‘lower’ and ‘higher’ functions of the psyche. Moreover, the death drive is pivotal in asecond sense, in that it articulates a turn away from the strictly empirical realm of science, to a dark andobscure (...)
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  8.  23
    The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the" Innocence of Becoming": Nietzsche, 9/11, and the" Falling Man".Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 35 (1):67-85.
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  9.  30
    The Uncanny Child of Australian Nationhood: Nostalgia as a Critical Tool in Conceptualizing Social Change.Joanne Faulkner - 2014 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 18 (2):125-148.
    Nostalgic, socially privileged ideals of childhood have actively contributed to the formation of Australian national identity, as well as modern subject-formations more broadly. This paper argues that, while such nostalgia has been drawn on for normative ends—in the service of the management of the modern individual—nostalgia also has the power to disrupt our conceptions of the normal. In the context of the contemporary “crisis” of childhood particularly, opportunities to reconstitute ideals of “childhood” and “family” differently have become available to communities (...)
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  10.  10
    Terror, Trauma, and the Ethics of Innocence.Joanne Faulkner - unknown
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  11.  46
    "Keeping It in the Family": Sarah Kofman Reading Nietzsche as a Jewish Woman.Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):41-64.
    : This article examines Sarah Kofman's interpretation of Nietzsche in light of the claim that interpretation was for her both an articulation of her identity and a mode of deconstructing the very notion of identity. Faulkner argues that Kofman's work on Nietzsche can be understood as autobiographical, in that it served to mediate a relation to her self. Faulkner examines this relation with reference to Klein's model of the child's connection to its mother. By examining Kofman's later writings on Nietzsche (...)
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  12.  34
    The Eternal Jouissance of the Community: Phantasm, Imagination, and 'Natural Man' in Hobbes.Joanne Faulkner - 2009 - Theory and Event 12 (3).
    The paper considers the part of Thomas Hobbes's 'natural man' in the construction of a culturally shared fantasy regarding pre-social humanity, and the marginalization of 'excluded' citizens who are seen in various ways to approximate that fantasy. While Hobbes did not valorize his hypothetical 'natural man,' I argue that his particularly dark elaboration of it lent an ambivalence to this ideal, which thereby enables it to function as a fantasy. With the aid of psychoanalytic theory, the paper explores the relation (...)
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  13.  24
    When Two Become One: The Prism Through Which Nietzsche Appears as Lacan.Joanne Faulkner - 2005 - Theory and Event 8 (1).
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  14.  13
    The Body As Text In The Writings Of Nietzsche And Freud.Joanne Faulkner - 2003 - Minerva 7:94-124.
    Recent publications have traced a relation of influence between Nietzsche's philosophy and Freudianpsychoanalysis. While Freud is certainly intellectually indebted to Nietzsche, the present paper emphasisesthe significant difference between these philosophers' works: Namely, that they exhibit a differenteconomy, and are thus committed to competing theoretical structures. This difference comes to the fore inthe approach that each takes to elaborating the mind-body relation, and especially in the contrast betweenFreud's early neuroscientific speculations and Nietzsche's emphasis uponlanguage, and particularly metaphor. In order to illustrate (...)
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  15.  8
    “Keeping It in the Family”: Sarah Kofman Reading Nietzsche as a Jewish Woman.Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):41-64.
    This article examines Sarah Kofman's interpretation of Nietzsche in light of the claim that interpretation was for her both an articulation of her identity and a mode of deconstructing the very notion of identity. Faulkner argues that Kofman's work on Nietzsche can be understood as autobiographical, in that it served to mediate a relation to her self. Faulkner examines this relation with reference to Klein's model of the child's connection to its mother. By examining Kofman's later writings on Nietzsche alongside (...)
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  16.  7
    The Eternal Jouissance of the Community: Phantasm, Imagination, and 'Natural Man' in Hobbes: HobbesThomas,.1588-1679.Joanne Faulkner - 2009 - Theory and Event 12 (3).
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  17.  5
    Historical Justice and Memory, Edited by Klaus Neumann and Janna Thompson. [REVIEW]Joanne Faulkner - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):204-205.
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  18.  7
    Vulnerability and the Passing of Childhood in Bill Henson: Innocence in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.Joanne Faulkner - 2011 - Parrhesia 11:44-55.
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  19.  4
    The Vision, the Riddle, and the Vicious Circle: Pierre Klossowski Reading Nietzsche’s Sick Body Through Sade’s Perversion.Joanne Faulkner - 2007 - .
    By comparing Pierre Klossowski’s works on Nietzsche and the Marquis de Sade, the paper attempts to clarify his understanding of the part played by the ‘bodily remainder’ in recruiting a following of readers to their texts. Klossowski’s designation of the ‘simulacrum’ of eternal return in Nietzsche’s philosophy is compared with his account of the role played by sodomy in Sade’s writings. Klossowski contends that, through these figures, a bodily contagion, is communicated to the reader, but esoterically: that is, only to (...)
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  20.  3
    Disgust, Purity, and a Longing for Companionship: Dialectics of Affect in Nietzsche's Imagined Community.Joanne Faulkner - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):49-68.
    Nietzsche’s relationship to his contemporaries, as expressed in his writings, was often figured by corporeal imagery evocative of disgust. For instance, in On the Genealogy of Morality Nietzsche declared himself to suffer from mankind—which he then proceeds to describe as “maggot”—or worm-like. Nietzsche’s philosophical project can be interpreted as a visceral protest against, and attempt to overcome, humanity. This paper argues that Nietzsche attempted through his writings to create a future community of like-constituted companions in his readers through a transmission (...)
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  21.  10
    Dead Letters to Nietzsche, or, the Necromantic Art of Reading Philosophy.Joanne Faulkner - 2010 - Ohio University Press.
    Introduction: The quickened and the dead -- Ontology for philologists : Nietzsche, body, subject -- "Be your self!" : Nietzsche as educator -- The life of thought : Nietzsche's truth perspectivism and the will to power -- Of slaves and masters : the birth of good and evil -- Moments of excess : the making and unmaking of the subject -- Lacan, desire, and the originating function of loss -- The word that sees me : the nexus of image and (...)
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  22. The Uncanny Child of Australian Nationhood: Nostalgia as a Critical Tool in Conceptualizing Social Change.Joanne Faulkner - 2014 - Symposium 18 (2):125-148.
    Nostalgic, socially privileged ideals of childhood have actively contributed to the formation of Australian national identity, as well as modern subject-formations more broadly. This paper argues that, while such nostalgia has been drawn on for normative ends—in the service of the management of the modern individual—nostalgia also has the power to disrupt our conceptions of the normal. In the context of the contemporary “crisis” of childhood particularly, opportunities to reconstitute ideals of “childhood” and “family” differently have become available to communities (...)
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  23.  4
    Young and Free: [Post]Colonial Ontologies of Childhood, Memory and History in Australia.Joanne Faulkner - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Engaging philosophy with history, literature, film and testimony, this book examines the critical relationship between white Australian identity and the cultural priority of childhood in Australia.
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  24. Understanding Psychoanalysis.Matthew Sharpe & Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Routledge.
    "Understanding Psychoanalysis" presents a broad introduction to the key concepts and developments in psychoanalysis and its impact on modern thought. Charting pivotal moments in the theorization and reception of psychoanalysis, the book provides a comprehensive account of the concerns and development of Freud's work, as well as his most prominent successors, Melanie Klein and Jacques Lacan.The work of these leading psychoanalytic theorists has greatly influenced thinking across other disciplines, notably feminism, film studies, poststructuralism, social and cultural theory, the philosophy of (...)
     
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