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Joanne Jones [3]Joanne C. Jones [1]
  1.  7
    Precarious Professionals: Secure Identities and Moral Agency in Neocolonial Context.Joanne Jones & Kelly Thomson - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):747-770.
    We contribute to the literature on ethics in the professions by theorizing how global mobility precipitates professional insecurity and constrained moral agency. We present our findings of a study of accountants migrating to Canada. Using postcolonial theory and relational/poststructuralist theories of identity and ethics, we contrast the experiences of marginalized and privileged migrant accountants to show how those with “diverse” social identities are not recognized by professionals in Canada and must seek recognition from Canadian colleagues, employers, and clients to reconstitute (...)
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  2.  12
    What’s in It for Me? An Examination of Accounting Students’ Likelihood to Report Faculty Misconduct.Joanne C. Jones, Gary Spraakman & Cristóbal Sánchez-Rodríguez - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (4):645-667.
    Since there are so few controls over detecting and preventing faculty misconduct, one of the most common ways in which it is discovered is through student reports. Given the importance of student reports in bringing to light faculty’s ethical lapses, this paper seeks to understand what factors influence students’ likelihood to report faculty misconduct. We develop an empirical model that integrates the decision process of the Prosocial Organizational Behavior Model with insights from the emotional perspective on whistleblowing. Specifically, we use (...)
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  3.  38
    An Investigation of Social Influence: Explaining the Effect of Group Discussion on Consensus in Auditors’ Ethical Reasoning.Linda Thorne, Dawn W. Massey & Joanne Jones - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (3):525-551.
    This study introduces Moscovici’s model of social influence to the accounting research domain, and uses an experimentto assess whether his theory explains how different types of discussion affects consensus in auditors’ ethical reasoning. Moscovici’s theory proposes three modalities of influence to describe how consensus is achieved following discussion: conformity, innovation, and normalization. Conformity describes the situation where individuals in the minority accede to the majority as a result of group discussion. Innovation describes the situation where individuals in the majority accede (...)
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    An Investigation of Social Influence: Explaining the Effect of Group Discussion on Consensus in Auditors’ Ethical Reasoning.Linda Thorne, Dawn W. Massey & Joanne Jones - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (3):525-551.
    This study introduces Moscovici’s (1976, 1985) model of social influence to the accounting research domain, and uses an experimentto assess whether his theory explains how different types of discussion affects consensus in auditors’ ethical reasoning. Moscovici’s theory proposes three modalities of influence to describe how consensus is achieved following discussion: conformity, innovation, and normalization. Conformity describes the situation where individuals in the minority (e.g., auditors that do not accept the dominant view) accede to the majority (e.g., auditors that hold the (...)
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