Results for 'Jodeph Adam Carter'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Anti-Luck Epistemology and Safety’s Discontents.Jodeph Adam Carter - 2010 - Philosophia 38 (3):517-532.
    Anti-luck epistemology is an approach to analyzing knowledge that takes as a starting point the widely-held assumption that knowledge must exclude luck. Call this the anti-luck platitude. As Duncan Pritchard (2005) has suggested, there are three stages constituent of anti-luck epistemology, each which specifies a different philosophical requirement: these stages call for us to first give an account of luck; second, specify the sense in which knowledge is incompatible with luck; and finally, show what conditions must be satisfied in order (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2. Intellectual Autonomy, Epistemic Dependence and Cognitive Enhancement.J. Adam Carter - 2017 - Synthese:1-25.
    Intellectual autonomy has long been identified as an epistemic virtue, one that has been championed influentially by Kant, Hume and Emerson. Manifesting intellectual autonomy, at least, in a virtuous way, does not require that we form our beliefs in cognitive isolation. Rather, as Roberts and Wood note, intellectually virtuous autonomy involves reliance and outsourcing to an appropriate extent, while at the same time maintaining intellectual self-direction. In this essay, I want to investigate the ramifications for intellectual autonomy of a particular (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3. Extended Cognition and Propositional Memory.J. Adam Carter & Jesper Kallestrup - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (3):691-714.
    The philosophical case for extended cognition is often made with reference to ‘extended-memory cases’ ; though, unfortunately, proponents of the hypothesis of extended cognition as well as their adversaries have failed to appreciate the kinds of epistemological problems extended-memory cases pose for mainstream thinking in the epistemology of memory. It is time to give these problems a closer look. Our plan is as follows: in §1, we argue that an epistemological theory remains compatible with HEC only if its epistemic assessments (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  4. Knowledge-How and Epistemic Value.J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (4):799-816.
    A conspicuous oversight in recent debates about the vexed problem of the value of knowledge has been the value of knowledge-how. This would not be surprising if knowledge-how were, as Gilbert Ryle [1945, 1949] famously thought, fundamentally different from knowledge-that. However, reductive intellectualists [e.g. Stanley and Williamson 2001; Brogaard 2008, 2009, 2011; Stanley 2011a, 2011b] maintain that knowledge-how just is a kind of knowledge-that. Accordingly, reductive intellectualists must predict that the value problems facing propositional knowledge will equally apply to knowledge-how. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  5. The Philosophy of Memory Technologies: Metaphysics, Knowledge, and Values.Heersmink Richard & Carter J. Adam - 2020 - Memory Studies 13 (4):416-433.
    Memory technologies are cultural artifacts that scaffold, transform, and are interwoven with human biological memory systems. The goal of this article is to provide a systematic and integrative survey of their philosophical dimensions, including their metaphysical, epistemological and ethical dimensions, drawing together debates across the humanities, cognitive sciences, and social sciences. Metaphysical dimensions of memory technologies include their function, the nature of their informational properties, ways of classifying them, and their ontological status. Epistemological dimensions include the truth-conduciveness of external memory, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  30
    J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos, and Duncan Pritchard : Socially Extended Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 336pp, £55.00 HB. [REVIEW]Joshua Habgood-Coote - forthcoming - Metascience:1-7.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  77
    The Value of Knowledge.Carter J. Adam, Pritchard Duncan & Turri John - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The value of knowledge has always been a central topic within epistemology. Going all the way back to Plato’s Meno, philosophers have asked, why is knowledge more valuable than mere true belief? Interest in this question has grown in recent years, with theorists proposing a range of answers. But some reject the premise of the question and claim that the value of knowledge is ‘swamped’ by the value of true belief. And others argue that statuses other than knowledge, such as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  8
    Intelligence, Wellbeing and Procreative Beneficence.Emma C. Gordon J. Adam Carter - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):122-135.
    If Savulescu's controversial principle of Procreative Beneficence is correct, then an important implication is that couples should employ genetic tests for non‐disease traits in selecting which child to bring into existence. Both defenders as well as some critics of this normative entailment of PB have typically accepted the comparatively less controversial claim about non‐disease traits: that there are non‐disease traits such that testing and selecting for them would in fact contribute to bringing about the child who is expected to have (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Disagreement.Maria Baghramian, J. Adam Carter & Richard Rowland (eds.) - forthcoming - Routledge.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  7
    Faulkner, Paul, Knowledge on Trust: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, Pp. X + 216, £35.00. [REVIEW]J. Adam Carter - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):409-413.
    This is a review of Faulkner, Paul, Knowledge on Trust, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, pp.240, US 55.00.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  11
    This Is Epistemology: An Introduction, by J. Adam Carter and Clayton Littlejohn.Matthew Carlson - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):239-242.
  12.  27
    Review of Epistemology by Ernest Sosa. [REVIEW]Carter Adam - 2017 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  58
    A Critical Introduction to Knowledge-How.J. Adam Carter & Ted Poston - 2018 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    We know facts, but we also know how to do things. To know a fact is to know that a proposition is true. But does knowing how to ride a bike amount to knowledge of propositions? This is a challenging question and one that deeply divides the contemporary landscape. A Critical Introduction to Knowledge-How introduces, outlines, and critically evaluates various contemporary debates surrounding the nature of knowledge-how. Carter and Poston show that situating the debate over the nature of knowledge-how (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  14.  39
    Extended Epistemology.J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Extended Cognition examines the way in which features of a subject's cognitive environment can become constituent parts of the cognitive process itself. This volume explores the epistemological ramifications of this idea, bringing together academics from a variety of different areas, to investigate the very idea of an extended epistemology.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15.  41
    Metaepistemology and Relativism.Joseph Adam Carter - 2016 - Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  16.  6
    Well Founded Belief: New Essays on the Epistemic Basing Relation.Joseph Adam Carter & Patrick Bondy (eds.) - 2019 - Routledge.
    Epistemological theories of knowledge and justification draw a crucial distinction between one's simply havinggood reasons for some belief, and one's actually basingone's belief on good reasons. While the most natural kind of account of basing is causal in nature--a belief is based on a reason if and only if the belief is properly caused by the reason--there is hardly any widely-accepted, counterexample-free account of the basing relation among contemporary epistemologists. Further inquiry into the nature of the basing relation is therefore (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17. Collective (Telic) Virtue Epistemology.J. Adam Carter - 2020 - In Mark Alfano, Jeroen de Ridder & Colin Klein (eds.), Social Virtue Epistemology. London: Routledge.
    A new way to transpose the virtue epistemologist’s ‘knowledge = apt belief’ template to the collective level, as a thesis about group knowledge, is developed. In particular, it is shown how specifically judgmental belief can be realised at the collective level in a way that is structurally analogous, on a telic theory of epistemic normativity (e.g., Sosa 2020), to how it is realised at the individual level—viz., through a (collective) intentional attempt to get it right aptly (whether p) by alethically (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18.  22
    New Humans? Ethics, Trust, and the Extended Mind.J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark & S. Orestis Palermos - 2018 - In J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Extended Epistemology. Oxon: Oxford University Press. pp. 331-352.
    Strange inversions occur when things work in ways that turn received wisdom upside down. Hume offered a strangely inverted story about causation, and Darwin, about apparent design. Dennett suggests that a strange inversion also occurs when we project our own reactive complexes outward, painting our world with elusive properties like cuteness, sweetness, blueness, sexiness, funniness, and more. Such properties strike us as experiential causes, but they are really effects—a kind of shorthand for whole sets of reactive dispositions rooted in the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  19.  3
    Socially Extended Epistemology.J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestes Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    This volume explores the epistemology of distributed cognition, the idea that groups of people can generate cognitive systems that consist of all participating members. Can distributed cognitive systems generate knowledge in a similar way to individuals? If so, how does this kind of knowledge differ from normal, individual knowledge?
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. Review Socially Extended Epistemology: J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos, and Duncan Pritchard : Socially Extended Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 336pp, £55.00 HB. [REVIEW]Joshua Habgood-Coote - 2019 - Metascience 1 (3):441-447.
  21.  61
    Epistemology and Relativism.Adam Carter - 2016
    Epistemology and Relativism Epistemology is, roughly, the philosophical theory of knowledge, its nature and scope. What is the status of epistemological claims? Relativists regard the status of epistemological claims as, in some way, relative— that is to say, that the truths which epistemological claims aspire to are … Continue reading Epistemology and Relativism →.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  22.  12
    Correction To: Review Socially Extended Epistemology: J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos, and Duncan Pritchard : Socially Extended Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 336pp, £55.00 HB. [REVIEW]Joshua Habgood-Coote - 2019 - Metascience 28 (3):449-449.
    This review essay was published without the title and therefore has been corrected.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  61
    The Philosophy of Group Polarization: Epistemology, Metaphysics, Psychology.Fernando Broncano-Berrocal & J. Adam Carter - 2021 - Routledge.
    Group polarization—roughly, the tendency of groups to incline towards more extreme positions than initially held by their individual members— has been rigorously studied by social psychol- ogists, though in a way that has overlooked important philosophical questions about this phenomenon which remain unexplored. Two such salient questions are metaphysical and epistemological, respectively. From a metaphysical point of view, can group polarization, understood as an epistemic feature of a group, be reduced to epistemic features of its individual members? Relatedly, from an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Relativism.Maria Baghramian & Adam J. Carter - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Relativism has been, in its various guises, both one of the most popular and most reviled philosophical doctrines of our time. Defenders see it as a harbinger of tolerance and the only ethical and epistemic stance worthy of the open-minded and tolerant. Detractors dismiss it for its alleged incoherence and uncritical intellectual permissiveness. Debates about relativism permeate the whole spectrum of philosophical sub-disciplines. From ethics to epistemology, science to religion, political theory to ontology, theories of meaning and even logic, philosophy (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  25. This is Epistemology.Clayton Littlejohn & J. Adam Carter - 2019 - Wiley.
    We have written an introduction to epistemology that is accessible, engaging, and up to date. (We hope.) -/- Introduction Chapter 1: The Regress Problem Chapter 2: Perception Chapter 3: The Apriori Chapter 4: Inference Chapter 5: On Knowing the Truth Chapter 6: Memory Chapter 7: Testimony Chapter 8: Kinds of Knowledge Chapter 9: Internalism vs. Externalism Chapter 10: The Ethics of Belief Chapter 11: Skepticism .
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  20
    Reply to Critics: Collective (Telic) Virtue Epistemology.J. Adam Carter - 2021 - In Mark Alfano, Jeroen de Ridder & Colin Klein (eds.), Social Virtue Epistemology.
    Here I reply to criticisms by Jeroen de Ridder and S. Kate Devitt to my "Collective Virtue Epistemology".
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  11
    Reply to Gardiner on Virtues of Attention.J. Adam Carter - 2021 - In Mark Alfano, Jerone de Ridder & Colin Klein (eds.), Social Virtue Epistemology.
    Here I reply to Georgi Gardiner's recent essay on the virtues of attention.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  7
    Reply to Watson on the Social Virtue of Questioning.J. Adam Carter - 2021 - In Mark Alfano, Jerone de Ridder & Colin Klein (eds.), Social Virtue Epistemology.
    I reply to Lani Watson's recent article on the social virtue of questioning.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  38
    Bi-Level Virtue Epistemology: A Defence.J. Adam Carter - forthcoming - Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Extended Epistemology.Carter Joseph Adam, Clark Andy, Kallestrup Jesper, Palermos Spyridon Orestis & Pritchard Duncan (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  3
    The Moral Psychology of Pride.Joseph Adam Carter & Emma C. Gordon (eds.) - 2017 - London: Rowman & Littlefield.
    This book demonstrates pride's unique profile in philosophical theory as both an emotion and an element of human virtue, and includes a range of represented perspectives: psychology; philosophy; sociology; and anthropology.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Knowledge‐How and Epistemic Luck.J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard - 2015 - Noûs 49 (3):440-453.
    Reductive intellectualists hold that knowledge-how is a kind of knowledge-that. For this thesis to hold water, it is obviously important that knowledge-how and knowledge-that have the same epistemic properties. In particular, knowledge-how ought to be compatible with epistemic luck to the same extent as knowledge-that. It is argued, contra reductive intellectualism, that knowledge-how is compatible with a species of epistemic luck which is not compatible with knowledge-that, and thus it is claimed that knowledge-how and knowledge-that come apart.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  33.  29
    Digital Knowledge.J. Adam Carter - forthcoming - Routledge.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Extended Epistemology.Joseph Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Socially Extended Knowledge.J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  77
    This is Epistemology: An Introduction.Clayton Littlejohn & J. Adam Carter - 2021 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    What is knowledge? Why is it valuable? How much of it do we have, and what ways of thinking are good ways to use to get more of it? These are just a few questions that are asked in epistemology, roughly, the philosophical theory of knowledge. This is Epistemology is a comprehensive introduction to the philosophical study of the nature, origin, and scope of human knowledge. Exploring both classic debates and contemporary issues in epistemology, this rigorous yet accessible textbook provides (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  2
    Relativism.Maria Baghramian & J. Adam Carter - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:1-60.
    Relativism, roughly put, is the view that truth and falsity, right and wrong, standards of reasoning, and procedures of justification are products of differing conventions and frameworks of assessment and that their authority is confined to the context giving rise to them. More precisely, ‘relativism’ covers views which maintain that—at a level of high abstraction—at least some class of things have properties they have not simpliciter, but only relative to a given framework of assessment, and correspondingly, that the truth of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  38.  6
    The Value of Knowledge.Duncan Pritchard, J. Adam Carter & John Turri - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The value of knowledge has always been a central topic within epistemology. Going all the way back to Plato’s Meno, philosophers have asked, why is knowledge more valuable than mere true belief? Interest in this question has grown in recent years, with theorists proposing a range of answers. But some reject the premise of the question and claim that the value of knowledge is ‘swamped’ by the value of true belief. And others argue that statuses other than knowledge, such as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  39. Robust Virtue Epistemology As Anti‐Luck Epistemology: A New Solution.J. Adam Carter - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):140-155.
    Robust Virtue Epistemology maintains that knowledge is achieved just when an agent gets to the truth through, or because of, the manifestation of intellectual virtue or ability. A notorious objection to the view is that the satisfaction of the virtue condition will be insufficient to ensure the safety of the target belief; that is, RVE is no anti-luck epistemology. Some of the most promising recent attempts to get around this problem are considered and shown to ultimately fail. Finally, a new (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  40.  7
    Review of Tim Henning and David P. Schweikard (Eds) Knowledge, Virtue and Action: Essays on Putting Epistemic Virtues to Work. [REVIEW]J. Adam Carter - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Knowledge‐How and Cognitive Achievement.J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (1):181-199.
    According to reductive intellectualism, knowledge-how just is a kind of propositional knowledge (e.g., Stanley & Williamson 2001; Stanley 2011a, 2011b; Brogaard, 2008a, 2008b, 2009, 2011, 2009, 2011). This proposal has proved controversial because knowledge-how and propositional knowledge do not seem to share the same epistemic properties, particularly with regard to epistemic luck. Here we aim to move the argument forward by offering a positive account of knowledge-how. In particular, we propose a new kind of anti-intellectualism. Unlike neo-Rylean anti-intellectualist views, according (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  42. Varieties of Externalism.J. Adam Carter, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard - 2014 - Philosophical Issues 24 (1):63-109.
    Our aim is to provide a topography of the relevant philosophical terrain with regard to the possible ways in which knowledge can be conceived of as extended. We begin by charting the different types of internalist and externalist proposals within epistemology, and we critically examine the different formulations of the epistemic internalism/externalism debate they lead to. Next, we turn to the internalism/externalism distinction within philosophy of mind and cognitive science. In light of the above dividing lines, we then examine first (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  43. Extended Emotion.J. Adam Carter, Emma C. Gordon & S. Orestis Palermos - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (2):198-217.
    Recent thinking within philosophy of mind about the ways cognition can extend has yet to be integrated with philosophical theories of emotion, which give cognition a central role. We carve out new ground at the intersection of these areas and, in doing so, defend what we call the extended emotion thesis: the claim that some emotions can extend beyond skin and skull to parts of the external world.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  44.  38
    Autonomous Knowledge: Radical Enhancement, Autonomy, and the Future of Knowing.J. Adam Carter - 2022 - Oxford University Press.
    Autonomous Knowledge: Radical Enhancement, Autonomy, and the Future of Knowing motivates and develops a new research programme in epistemology that is centred around the concept of epistemic autonomy.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Absolutism, Relativism and Metaepistemology.J. Adam Carter & Robin McKenna - 2019 - Erkenntnis 86 (5):1139-1159.
    This paper is about two topics: metaepistemological absolutism and the epistemic principles governing perceptual warrant. Our aim is to highlight—by taking the debate between dogmatists and conservativists about perceptual warrant as a case study—a surprising and hitherto unnoticed problem with metaepistemological absolutism, at least as it has been influentially defended by Paul Boghossian as the principal metaepistemological contrast point to relativism. What we find is that the metaepistemological commitments at play on both sides of this dogmatism/conservativism debate do not line (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46.  38
    The Epistemology of Group Disagreement.Fernando Broncano-Berrocal & Adam Carter (eds.) - 2020 - Routledge.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. The Defeasibility of Knowledge-How.J. Adam Carter & Jesús Navarro - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (3):662-685.
    Reductive intellectualists (e.g., Stanley & Williamson 2001; Stanley 2011a; 2011b; Brogaard 2008; 2009; 2011) hold that knowledge-how is a kind of knowledge-that. If this thesis is correct, then we should expect the defeasibility conditions for knowledge-how and knowledge-that to be uniform—viz., that the mechanisms of epistemic defeat which undermine propositional knowledge will be equally capable of imperilling knowledge-how. The goal of this paper is twofold: first, against intellectualism, we will show that knowledge-how is in fact resilient to being undermined by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  48. Openmindedness and Truth.J. Adam Carter & Emma C. Gordon - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):207-224.
    While openmindedness is often cited as a paradigmatic example of an intellectual virtue, the connection between openmindedness and truth is tenuous. Several strategies for reconciling this tension are considered, and each is shown to fail; it is thus claimed that openmindedness, when intellectually virtuous, bears no interesting essential connection to truth. In the final section, the implication of this result is assessed in the wider context of debates about epistemic value.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  49. The Value of Knowledge.J. Adam Carter, Duncan Pritchard & John Turri - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The value of knowledge has always been a central topic within epistemology. Going all the way back to Plato’s Meno, philosophers have asked, why is knowledge more valuable than mere true belief? Interest in this question has grown in recent years, with theorists proposing a range of answers. But some reject the premise of the question and claim that the value of knowledge is ‘swamped’ by the value of true belief. And others argue that statuses other than knowledge, such as (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  50. Belief Without Credence.J. Adam Carter, Benjamin W. Jarvis & Katherine Rubin - 2016 - Synthese 193 (8):2323-2351.
    One of the deepest ideological divides in contemporary epistemology concerns the relative importance of belief versus credence. A prominent consideration in favor of credence-based epistemology is the ease with which it appears to account for rational action. In contrast, cases with risky payoff structures threaten to break the link between rational belief and rational action. This threat poses a challenge to traditional epistemology, which maintains the theoretical prominence of belief. The core problem, we suggest, is that belief may not be (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000