Order:
  1.  17
    Plato’s Forms in Transition.Joe McCoy - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (3):684-686.
  2.  51
    The Argument of the Philebus.Joe McCoy - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):1-16.
    This essay explores Socrates’ argumentative strategy in the Philebus, which is a response to the view that pleasure is the good. Socrates leads his interlocutorsthrough a series of steps in order to demonstrate to them the “conditions and dispositions of soul” upon which hedonism rests. Socrates’ aim is not to refute the claim that pleasure is a good, but rather to show the dependence of the experience of pleasure on intellect and the other elements of the life of mind. In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  17
    Die Univozität des Seienden. Texte Zur Metaphysik.Joe McCoy - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):145-146.
    This volume contributes to scholarship in several ways: first, it brings into print selections from Scotus’s writings on the univocity of the notion of being—a central claim in his philosophical system. Second, it provides a clear translation into modern German of the Lectura, one of Scotus’s three commentaries on Lombard’s Sentences. Third, it gives an overview of the philosophical motivations and the historical precursors of Scotus’s work.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  27
    The Appropriation of Myth and the Sayings of the Wise in Plato’s Meno and Philebus.Joe McCoy - 2004 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:169-178.
    In this article, I discuss the incorporation of traditional ‘sayings of the wise’ and the mythical presentation of certain doctrines in the Platonic dialogues, particularly the Meno’s myth of recollection and the Philebus’s myth of the limit and the unlimited. I argue against a common view of Platonic myth, which holds that such passages are merely rhetorical devices and naive presentations of philosophical doctrines, whose aura of traditional authority ultimately forestalls and inhibits philosophical reflection. I attempt to show in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark