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  1.  30
    Words and Wards: A Model of Reflective Writing and Its Uses in Medical Education. [REVIEW]Johanna Shapiro, Deborah Kasman & Audrey Shafer - 2006 - Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (4):231-244.
    Personal, creative writing as a process for reflection on patient care and socialization into medicine (“reflective writing”) has important potential uses in educating medical students and residents. Based on the authors’ experiences with a range of writing activities in academic medical settings, this article sets forth a conceptual model for considering the processes and effects of such writing. The first phase (writing) is individual and solitary, consisting of personal reflection and creation. Here, introspection and imagination guide learners from loss of (...)
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  2.  37
    Medical Professionalism: What the Study of Literature Can Contribute to the Conversation.Johanna Shapiro, Lois L. Nixon, Stephen E. Wear & David J. Doukas - 2015 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10:10.
    Medical school curricula, although traditionally and historically dominated by science, have generally accepted, appreciated, and welcomed the inclusion of literature over the past several decades. Recent concerns about medical professional formation have led to discussions about the specific role and contribution of literature and stories. In this article, we demonstrate how professionalism and the study of literature can be brought into relationship through critical and interrogative interactions based in the literary skill of close reading. Literature in medicine can question the (...)
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  3.  33
    Walking a Mile in Their Patients' Shoes: Empathy and Othering in Medical Students' Education. [REVIEW]Johanna Shapiro - 2008 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:10.
    One of the major tasks of medical educators is to help maintain and increase trainee empathy for patients. Yet research suggests that during the course of medical training, empathy in medical students and residents decreases. Various exercises and more comprehensive paradigms have been introduced to promote empathy and other humanistic values, but with inadequate success. This paper argues that the potential for medical education to promote empathy is not easy for two reasons: a) Medical students and residents have complex and (...)
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  4.  38
    Always a Surprise, Even a Wonder: Poetry and Commentary. [REVIEW]Amy Haddad, Donna Pucciani, Johanna Shapiro & Audrey Shafer - 2007 - Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (2):105-114.
  5.  3
    Speaking with Frankenstein.Jayne Lewis & Johanna Shapiro - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-16.
    This collaborative essay experimentally applies the insights of Mary Shelley's 1818 gothic fantasy Frankenstein to clinical interactions between present-day physicians and the patients they, akin to Shelley's human protagonist, so often seem to bring to life. Because that process is frequently fraught with unspoken elements of ambivalence, disappointment, frustration, and failure, we find in Shelley's speculative fiction less a cautionary tale of overreach than a dynamic parable of the role that the unspoken, the invisible, and the unknown might play in (...)
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  6.  15
    The Limits of Narrative and Culture: Reflections on Lorrie Moore's “People Like That Are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk”.Pamela Schaff & Johanna Shapiro - 2006 - Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (1):1-17.
    This article provides a discussion of the limits of both narrative and culture based on a close textual analysis of the short story, “People Like That Are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk,” by Lorrie Moore. In this story, a mother describes her experiences on a pediatric oncology ward when her infant son develops Wilms' tumor. The authors examine how the story satirically portrays the spurious claims of language, story, and culture to protect us from an unjust (...)
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  7.  8
    Correction To: Medical Students’ Efforts to Integrate and/or Reclaim Authentic Identity: Insights From a Mask-Making Exercise.Johanna Shapiro, Julie Youm, Michelle Heare, Anju Hurria, Gabriella Miotto, Bao-Nhan Nguyen, Tan Nguyen, Kevin Simonson & Atur Turakhia - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities.
    The authors would like to correct a misspelling in the name of one of the authors due to a typographical error. The name should read Atur Turakhia, not Artur Turakhia. This does not change the conclusions or interpretations presented.
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  8. Downstairs My Father is Dying.Johanna Shapiro - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (1):89-90.
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  9.  4
    Medical Students’ Efforts to Integrate and/or Reclaim Authentic Identity: Insights from a Mask-Making Exercise.Johanna Shapiro, Julie Youm, Michelle Heare, Anju Hurria, Gabriella Miotto, Bao-Nhan Nguyen, Tan Nguyen, Kevin Simonson & Artur Turakhia - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (4):483-501.
    Medical students’ mask-making can provide valuable insights into personal and professional identity formation and wellness. A subset of first- and second-year medical students attending a medical school wellness retreat participated in a mask-making workshop. Faculty-student teams examined student masks and explanatory narratives using visual and textual analysis techniques. A quantitative survey assessed student perceptions of the experience. We identified an overarching theme: “Reconciliation/reclamation of authentic identity.” The combination of nonverbal mask-making and narrative offers rich insights into medical students’ experience and (...)
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  10.  22
    “Violence” in Medicine: Necessary and Unnecessary, Intentional and Unintentional.Johanna Shapiro - 2018 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 13 (1):7.
    We are more used to thinking of medicine in relation to the ways that it alleviates the effects of violence. Yet an important thread in the academic literature acknowledges that medicine can also be responsible for perpetuating violence, albeit unintentionally, against the very individuals it intends to help. In this essay, I discuss definitions of violence, emphasizing the importance of understanding the term not only as a physical perpetration but as an act of power of one person over another. I (...)
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