19 found
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  1. From Embodied to Extended Cognition.John A. Teske - 2013 - Zygon 48 (3):759-787.
    Embodied cognitive science holds that cognitive processes are deeply and inescapably rooted in our bodily interactions with the world. Our finite, contingent, and mortal embodiment may be not only supportive, but in some cases even constitutive of emotions, thoughts, and experiences. My discussion here will work outward from the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the brain to a nervous system which extends to the boundaries of the body. It will extend to nonneural aspects of embodiment and even beyond the boundaries of (...)
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  2.  15
    Knowing Ourselves by Telling Stories to Ourselves.John A. Teske - 2017 - Zygon 52 (3):880-902.
    Part of the epistemological crisis of the twentieth century was caused by empirically establishing that introspection provides little reliable self-knowledge. While we all have full actual selves to which our self-representations do not do full justice, we focus on the formation and existence of a narrative self, and on problematic reliability. We will explore the cognitive neuroscience behind its limitations, including pathological forms of confabulation, the generation of plausible but insufficiently grounded accounts of our actions, and the normal patterns of (...)
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  3.  61
    Externalism, Relational Selves, and Redemptive Relationships.John A. Teske - 2011 - Zygon 46 (1):183-203.
    Abstract. The dangerous level of individuality in contemporary Western culture is informed by a conception of mind, self, and soul as internal to the central nervous system. The historical development of this view has produced a bounded and self-contained individual at odds with communal life. Happily, scientific and philosophical studies of mind are coming to view the human mind as embodied, enactive, encultured, and embedded in social and technical networks, and as a construction not limited to the boundaries of the (...)
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  4. Varieties of Reasoning: Assessing Adequacy.John A. Teske - 2003 - Zygon 38 (2):441-449.
    Helmut Reich’s theory of relational and contextual reasoning is a courageous initiative for the resolution of cognitive conflicts between apparently incompatible or incommensurable views. Built upon Piagetian logico-mathematical reasoning, cognitive complexity theory, and dialectical and analogical reasoning, it includes the development of a both/and logic inclusive of binary either/or logic. Reich provides philosophic, theoretical, and even initial empirical support for the development of this form of reasoning along with a heuristic for its application. A valuable step beyond the limits of (...)
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  5.  64
    Cyberpsychology, Human Relationships, and Our Virtual Interiors.John A. Teske - 2002 - Zygon 37 (3):677-700.
    Recent research suggests an “Internet paradox”—that a communications technology might reduce social involvement and psychological well–being. In this article I examine some of the limitations of current Internet communication, including those of access, medium, presentation, and choice, that bear on the formation and maintenance of social relationships. I also explore issues central to human meaning in a technological culture—those of the history of the self, of individuality, and of human relationships—and suggest that social forces, technological and otherwise, have increasingly eroded (...)
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  6.  43
    Editorial Overview.John A. Teske - 2011 - Zygon 46 (1):105-110.
    Abstract. Concepts of individual autonomy underlie much of contemporary self-understanding, including the institutions and ways of living in modern societies. These concepts of autonomy are complex, even contradictory, and may present problems for our future. This overview sketches the narrative arc of a collection of papers addressing these topics. While autonomy and individuality are not fictions, neither do what we take to be individuality or autonomy have an unchanging reality. We are both influenced by and have an influence upon how (...)
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  7. Narrative and Meaning in Science and Religion.John A. Teske - 2010 - Zygon 45 (1):91-104.
    Differences of understanding in science and in religion can be explored via the distinction between paradigmatic and narrative modes of explanation. Although science is inclusive of the paradigmatic, I propose that in explaining the behavior of complex adaptive systems, and in the human sciences in particular, narratives may well constitute the best scientific explanations. Causal relationships may be embedded within, and expressions of higher-order constraints provided by, complex system dynamics, best understood via the temporal organization of intentionalities that constitute narrative. (...)
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  8.  49
    The Genesis of Mind and Spirit.John A. Teske - 2001 - Zygon 36 (1):93-104.
  9.  90
    A Literary Trinity for Cognitive Science and Religion.John A. Teske - 2010 - Zygon 45 (2):469-478.
    The cognitive sciences may be understood to contribute to religion-and-science as a metadisciplinary discussion in ways that can be organized according to the three persons of narrative, encoding the themes of consciousness, relationality, and healing. First-person accounts are likely to be important to the understanding of consciousness, the "hard problem" of subjective experience, and contribute to a neurophenomenology of mind, even though we must be aware of their role in human suffering, their epistemic limits, and their indirect causal role in (...)
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  10.  45
    Neuromythology: Brains and Stories.John A. Teske - 2006 - Zygon 41 (1):169-196.
    . I sketch a synthetic integration of several levels of explanation in addressing how myths, narratives, and stories engage human beings, produce their sense of identity and self‐understanding, and shape their intellectual, emotional, and embodied lives. Ultimately it is our engagement with the metanarratives of religious imagination by which we address a set of existentially necessary but ontologically unanswerable metaphysical questions that form the basis of religious belief. I show how a multileveled understanding of evolutionary biology, history, neuroscience, psychology, narrative, (...)
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  11.  34
    The Spiritual Limits of Neuropsychological Life.John A. Teske - 1996 - Zygon 31 (2):209-234.
  12.  42
    The Haunting of the Human Spirit.John A. Teske - 1999 - Zygon 34 (2):307-322.
  13.  59
    Creation: Law and Probability. Edited by Fraser Watts.John A. Teske - 2010 - Zygon 45 (1):286-287.
  14.  36
    Cognitive Neuroscience, Temporal Ordering, and the Human Spirit.John A. Teske - 2001 - Zygon 36 (4):667-678.
  15.  34
    A Janus Face Upon Religion From Scientific Materialism.John A. Teske - 2005 - Zygon 40 (2):289-298.
  16. Metatheoretical Issues in Cognitive Science.John A. Teske & Roy D. Pea - 1981 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 2 (2):123-178.
  17.  10
    The Road is Made by Walking: An Introduction.Pat Bennett & John A. Teske - 2017 - Zygon 52 (3):764-776.
    We are living in a time of unprecedented challenges: human activity is now the primary driver shaping the planet and we are perilously close to breaching a variety of critical planetary boundaries—a prelude to the possible extinction of our species. How should we be thinking and acting—as persons, communities, institutions and societies—so as to best understand and respond to these challenges? What contribution can the field of science and religion make to develop the knowledge needed to negotiate the civilizational transition (...)
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  18. William R. LaFleur.Willem B. Drees, Philip Hefner, Rustum Roy, John A. Teske, H. Cyberpsychology & Terence L. Nichols Why Miracles - 2002 - Zygon 37 (3-4):768.
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  19. John F. Haught in Search of a God for Evolution: Paul Tillich and Pierre Teilhard de Chardin Edward L. Schoen Clocks, God, and Scientific Realism Michael Ruse Robert Boyle and the Machine Metaphor Human Meaning in a Technological Culture.Thomas Rockwell, William R. LaFleur, Willem B. Drees, Philip Hefner, Rustum Roy, John A. Teske, Human Relationships Cyberpsychology & Terence L. Nichols Why Miracles - 2002 - Zygon 37 (3-4):768.