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Profile: John Bishop (University of Auckland)
Profile: John Bishop (Baylor University)
Profile: John Bishop (George Mason University)
Profile: John Mark Bishop (Goldsmiths College, University of London)
  1.  71
    Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief.John Bishop - 2007 - Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press.
    Does our available evidence show that some particular religion is correct?
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  2. The Normatively Relativised Logical Argument From Evil.John Bishop & Ken Perszyk - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):109-126.
    It is widely agreed that the ‘Logical’ Argument from Evil (LAFE) is bankrupt. We aim to rehabilitate the LAFE, in the form of what we call the Normatively Relativised Logical Argument from Evil (NRLAFE). There are many different versions of a NRLAFE. We aim to show that one version, what we call the ‘right relationship’ NRLAFE, poses a significant threat to personal-omniGod-theism—understood as requiring the belief that there is an omnipotent, omniscient, perfectly good person who has created our world—because it (...)
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  3. Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence.John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    The most famous challenge to computational cognitive science and artificial intelligence is the philosopher John Searle's "Chinese Room" argument.
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  4. Agent-Causation.John D. Bishop - 1983 - Mind 92 (January):61-79.
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  5.  38
    For-Profit Corporations in a Just Society.John Douglas Bishop - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (2):191-212.
    This article develops contractarian business ethics by applying social contract arguments to a specific question: What are the pre-legal rights and responsibilities of corporations? The argument uses a hypothetical social contract to show the existence of for-profit corporations in democratic capitalist societies is consistent with Rawls’s fundamental principles of justice. Corporations ought to have recognised their rights to be autonomous, to pursue private purposes, andto engage in economic activities. Corporations have a responsibility to respect the freedom and human rights of (...)
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  6.  58
    How a Modest Fideism May Constrain Theistic Commitments: Exploring an Alternative to Classical Theism.John Bishop - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (3-4):387-402.
    On the assumption that theistic religious commitment takes place in the face of evidential ambiguity, the question arises under what conditions it is permissible to make a doxastic venture beyond one’s evidence in favour of a religious proposition. In this paper I explore the implications for orthodox theistic commitment of adopting, in answer to that question, a modest, moral coherentist, fideism. This extended Jamesian fideism crucially requires positive ethical evaluation of both the motivation and content of religious doxastic ventures. I (...)
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  7.  30
    The Limits of Corporate Human Rights Obligations and the Rights of For-Profit Corporations.John Douglas Bishop - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):119-144.
    The extension of human rights obligations to corporations raises questions about whose rights and which rights corporations are responsible for. This paper gives a partial answer by asking what legal rights corporations would need to have to fulfil various sorts of human rights obligations. We should compare thechances of human rights fulfilment (and violations) that are likely to result from assigning human rights obligations to corporations with the chances of humanrights fulfilment (and violations) that are likely to result from giving (...)
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  8. Divine Action Beyond the Personal omniGod.John Bishop & Ken Perszyk - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion.
  9.  42
    Is Self-Identity Image Advertising Ethical?John Douglas Bishop - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (2):371-398.
    Discussions of the ethics of advertising have been based on a general distinction between informative and persuasive advertising without looking at specific techniques of persuasion. Self-identity image ads persuade by presenting an image of an idealizedperson-type such as a “beautiful” woman (Chanel) or a sexy teen (Calvin Klein). The product becomes a symbol of the ideal, and targetconsumers are invited to use the product to project the self-image to themselves and others. This paper argues that image ads are notfalse or (...)
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  10. Adam Smith's Invisible Hand Argument.John D. Bishop - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (3):165 - 180.
    Adam Smith is usually thought to argue that the result of everyone pursuing their own interests will be the maximization of the interests of society. The invisible hand of the free market will transform the individual''s pursuit of gain into the general utility of society. This is the invisible hand argument.Many people, although Smith did not, draw a moral corollary from this argument, and use it to defend the moral acceptability of pursuing one''s own self-interest.
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  11.  70
    Counterfactuals Cannot Count: A Rejoinder to David Chalmers.John Mark Bishop - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):642-652.
    The initial argument presented herein is not significantly original—it is a simple reflection upon a notion of computation originally developed by Putnam and criticised by Chalmers et al. . In what follows, instead of seeking to justify Putnam’s conclusion that every open system implements every Finite State Automaton and hence that psychological states of the brain cannot be functional states of a computer, I will establish the weaker result that, over a finite time window every open system implements the trace (...)
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  12.  54
    Towards a Religiously Adequate Alternative to Omnigod Theism.John Bishop - 2009 - Sophia 48 (4):419-433.
    Theistic religious believers should be concerned that the God they worship is not an idol. Conceptions of God thus need to be judged according to criteria of religious adequacy that are implicit in the ‘God-role’—that is, the way the concept of God properly functions in the conceptual economy and form of life of theistic believers. I argue that the conception of God as ‘omniGod’—an immaterial personal creator with the omni-properties—may reasonably be judged inadequate, at any rate from the perspective of (...)
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  13.  55
    The Argument From Evil and the God of 'Frightening' Love.John Bishop - 2013 - Sophia 52 (1):45-49.
  14. Why Computers Can't Feel Pain.John Mark Bishop - 2009 - Minds and Machines 19 (4):507-516.
    The most cursory examination of the history of artificial intelligence highlights numerous egregious claims of its researchers, especially in relation to a populist form of ‘strong’ computationalism which holds that any suitably programmed computer instantiates genuine conscious mental states purely in virtue of carrying out a specific series of computations. The argument presented herein is a simple development of that originally presented in Putnam’s (Representation & Reality, Bradford Books, Cambridge in 1988 ) monograph, “Representation & Reality”, which if correct, has (...)
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  15.  30
    On the Possibility of Doxastic Venture: A Reply to Buckareff.John Bishop - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (4):447.
    In response to Buckareff, I agree that it is indeed impossible intentionally and directly to acquire a belief one judges not to be supported by one's evidence. But Jamesian doxastic venture does not involve any such direct self-inducing of belief: it is rather a matter of an agent's taking to be true in practical reasoning what she already, through some ‘passional’, non-epistemic, cause, holds true beyond the support of her evidence. To deny that beliefs may sometimes have passional causes is, (...)
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  16. Compatibilism and the Free Will Defense.John D. Bishop - 1993 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71 (2):104-20.
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  17.  31
    The Imitation Game.John Mark Bishop - 2010 - Kybernetes 39 (3):398-402.
    This issue of the Kybernetes journal is concerned with the philosophical question- Can a Machine Think? Famously, in his 1950 paper `Computing Machinery andIntelligence' [9], the British mathematician Alan Turing suggested replacing this question - which he found \too meaningless to deserve discussion" - with a simple -behavioural - test based on an imagined `Victorianesque' pastime he entitled the`imitation game'. In this special issue of Kybernetes a selection of authors with a special interest in Turing's work (including those who participated (...)
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  18. Natural Agency.John Bishop - 1991 - Mind 100 (2):287-290.
     
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  19.  76
    Causal Pluralism and the Problem of Natural Agency.John Bishop - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (3):527-536.
  20.  95
    Prospects for a Naturalist Libertarianism: O'Connor's Persons and Causes.John D. Bishop - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):228-243.
  21.  31
    Secular Spirituality and the Logic of Giving Thanks.John Bishop - 2010 - Sophia 49 (4):523-534.
    Some atheists are attracted to the idea of a secular spirituality that carries no commitment to the existence of God or anything similar. Is this a coherent possibility? This paper seeks to define what we mean by a ‘spirituality’ by examining Robert C. Solomon’s defence of spirituality for the religious skeptic, and pursues the question of its coherence by reflecting on what is implied by taking thankfulness to be a proper response to our existence.
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  22.  75
    Thompson , Michael . Life and Action: Elementary Structures of Practice and Practical Thought . Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008. Pp. 240. $44.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]John Bishop - 2011 - Ethics 122 (1):212-220.
  23.  56
    On the Prospects for a Naturalistic Incompatibilist Metaphysics of Agency.John Bishop - 2015 - Analysis 75 (4):655-661.
  24.  60
    'How to Answer the "de Jure" Question About Christian Belief.John Bishop & Imran Aijaz - 2004 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 56 (2/3):109 - 129.
  25.  59
    Faith as Doxastic Venture.John Bishop - 2002 - Religious Studies 38 (4):471-487.
    A ‘doxastic venture’ model of faith – according to which having faith involves believing beyond what is rationally justifiable – can be defended only on condition that such venturesome believing is both possible and ethically acceptable. I show how a development of the position argued by William James in ‘The will to believe’ can succeed in meeting these conditions. A Jamesian defence of doxastic venture is, however, open to the objection that decision theory teaches us that there can be no (...)
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  26.  27
    The Divine Attributes and Non-Personal Conceptions of God.John Bishop & Ken Perszyk - 2017 - Topoi 36 (4):609-621.
    Analytical philosophers of religion widely assume that God is a person, albeit immaterial and of unique status, and the divine attributes are thus understood as attributes of this supreme personal being. Our main aim is to consider how traditional divine attributes may be understood on a non-personal conception of God. We propose that foundational theist claims make an all-of-Reality reference, yet retain God’s status as transcendent Creator. We flesh out this proposal by outlining a specific non-personal, monist and ‘naturalist’ conception (...)
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  27.  47
    Can There Be Alternative Concepts of God?John Bishop - 1998 - Noûs 32 (2):174-188.
  28.  20
    Moral Motivation and the Development of Francis Hutcheson's Philosophy.John D. Bishop - 1996 - Journal of the History of Ideas 57 (2):277-295.
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  29. Is Agent-Causality a Conceptal Primitive?John D. Bishop - 1986 - Synthese 67 (May):225-47.
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  30.  79
    More Thought on Thought and Talk.John D. Bishop - 1980 - Mind 89 (January):1-16.
  31.  32
    Moral Intuitions Versus Game Theory: A Response to Marcoux on Résumé Embellishing.John Douglas Bishop - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):181-189.
    Marcoux argues that job candidates ought to embellish non-verifiable information on their résumés because it is the best way to coordinate collective action in the résumé ‚game’. I do not dispute his analysis of collective action; I look at the larger picture, which throws light on the role game theory might play in ethics. I conclude that game theory’s conclusions have nothing directly to do with ethics. Game theory suggests the means to certain ends, but the ethics of both the (...)
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  32. The Moral Responsibility of Corporate Executives for Disasters.John D. Bishop - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (5):377 - 383.
    This paper examines whether or not senior corporate executives are morally responsible for disasters which result from corporate activities. The discussion is limited to the case in which the information needed to prevent the disaster is present within the corporation, but fails to reach senior executives. The failure of information to reach executives is usually a result of negative information blockage, a phenomenon caused by the differing roles of constraints and goals within corporations. Executives should be held professionally responsible not (...)
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  33.  73
    Evidence and Religious Belief, by Kelly James Clark and Raymond J. VanArragon (Eds).John Bishop - 2013 - Mind 122 (486):fzt054.
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  34.  84
    Peacocke on Intentional Action.John Bishop - 1980 - Analysis 41 (2):92 - 98.
  35.  36
    Faith.John Bishop - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  36.  14
    A Cognitive Computation Fallacy? Cognition, Computations and Panpsychism.John Mark Bishop - 2009 - Cognitive Computation 1 (3):221-233.
    The journal of Cognitive Computation is defined in part by the notion that biologically inspired computational accounts are at the heart of cognitive processes in both natural and artificial systems. Many studies of various important aspects of cognition (memory, observational learning, decision making, reward prediction learning, attention control, etc.) have been made by modelling the various experimental results using ever-more sophisticated computer programs. In this manner progressive inroads have been made into gaining a better understanding of the many components of (...)
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  37.  75
    Causal Deviancy and Multiple Intentions: A Reply to James Montmarquet.John Bishop - 1985 - Analysis 45 (3):163 - 168.
  38. Book Review. Arguing for Atheism. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion Robin le Poidevin. [REVIEW]John Bishop - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):497-501.
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  39.  89
    The Analogy Theory of Thinking.John D. Bishop - 1980 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):222-238.
  40.  28
    The Philosophy of Religion: A Programmatic Overview.John Bishop - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (5):506–534.
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  41. Things and Places: How the Mind Connects with the World, by Zenon Pylyshyn. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2007. Pp. Xiv + 255. H/B £25.95, $34.00. [REVIEW]John Bishop - unknown
    A new book by Zenon Pylyshyn is always a cause for celebration among philosophers of psychology. While many hard-nosed experimental cognitive scientists are attentive to philosophers’ concerns, Pylyshyn stands alone in the extraordinary efforts he takes to understand, address, and struggle with the philosophical puzzles that the mind, and perception in particular, raises. Pylyshyn’s most recent work, Things and Places: How the Mind Connects with the World, does not disappoint. It is philosophically rich. Indeed, the approach to object perception that (...)
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  42.  22
    Evil and the Concept of God.John Bishop - 1993 - Philosophical Papers 22 (1):1-15.
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  43.  70
    Paul K. Moser the Elusive God: Reorienting Religious Epistemology. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008). Pp. XI+292. £45.00 (Hbk). Isbn 978 0 521 88903. [REVIEW]John Bishop - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (4):504-509.
  44.  42
    Exercising Control in Practical Reasoning: Problems for Naturalism About Agency.John Bishop - 2012 - Philosophical Issues 22 (1):53-72.
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  45.  50
    Locke's Theory of Original Appropriation and the Right of Settlement in Iroquois Territory.John Douglas Bishop - 1997 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):311 - 337.
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  46.  14
    Crossing the Boundaries of Obligation: Are Corporate Salaries a Form of Bribery?John Douglas Bishop - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (1):1-11.
    . Trans-National Corporations (TNCs) pay relatively high salaries to local people in host countries. TNCs assume that such employees will accept an employeeÇôemployer relationship similar to that which exists in North America, but the obligations and personal interests that such a relationship create often directly conflict with systems of obligation already established in the host country. When TNCs do business across the boundaries of systems of obligation, corporate salaries can be seen as a form of unethical bribery. In this paper, (...)
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  47.  23
    Deciding to Believe: The Ethics and Rationality of Religious Belief.John Bishop - 1995 - Sophia 34 (1):9-31.
    A Jamesian defence of a moderate fideism which holds that acceptance of (religious) belief beyond, though not contrary to, the evidence is morally permissible--though only under quite tight conditions, which, I argue, include the requirement that the "passional basis" for such acceptance must itself be morally admirable. The claim that "suprarational" faith is virtuous thus remains open, even though vindicated against the objection that believing beyond the evidence is always vicious. I also explore the extent to which the proposal that (...)
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  48.  1
    Natural Agency: An Essay on the Causal Theory of Action.Michael J. Zimmerman & John Bishop - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (3):687.
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  49.  42
    Sajama, Seppo. Idea, Judgement and Will, University of Turku, Finland, 1983, Reports From the Department of Theoretical Philosophy.John Bishop - 1986 - Theoria 52 (1-2):98-117.
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  50.  31
    Is a Unified Science of the Mind-Brain Possible?John Bishop - 1988 - Biology and Philosophy 3 (3):375-391.
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