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John Maraldo
University of North Florida
  1.  87
    Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
    This is a set of essays and translations that covers comprehensively all of Japanese philosophy.
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  2.  25
    Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida.John C. Maraldo - 2017 - Chisokudo Publications.
    The first of 3 volumes of essays on Japanese philosophy, this work brings together essays that clarify its heritage and its practice, above all in the dynamic thought of Nishida Kitaro. Showing how philosophy takes shape through the translation of language and culture, the author examines the frameworks that have defined and confined Nishida’s thought and then charts new avenues of questioning Nishida and letting him question us. How should we envision the world at a time of environmental crisis, how (...)
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  3.  28
    Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism.James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo (eds.) - 1995 - University of Hawai'i Press.
    Zen Buddhist Attitudes to War HIRATA Seiko IN ORDER FULLY TO UNDERSTAND the standpoint of Zen on the question of nationalism, one must first consider the ...
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  4.  38
    Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, and the Question of Nationalism.Steven Heine, James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (3):439.
  5.  16
    Heidegger and Asian Thought.John C. Maraldo - 1991 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 29 (3):189-190.
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  6.  23
    Japanese Philosophy as a Lens on Greco-European Thought.John C. Maraldo - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):21-56.
    To answer the question of whether there is such a thing as Japanese philosophy, and what its characteristics might be, scholars have typi­cally used Western philosophy as a measure to examine Japanese texts. This article turns the tables and asks what Western thought looks like from the perspective of Japanese philosophy. It uses Japanese philo­sophical sources as a lens to bring into sharper focus the qualities and biases of Greek-derived Western philosophy. It first examines ques­tions related to the reputed sole (...)
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  7.  2
    Der Hermeneutische Zirkel: Untersuchungen Zu Schleiermacher, Dilthey Und Heidegger.John C. Maraldo - 1974
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  8.  10
    Rediscovering the West: An Inquiry Into Nothingness and Relatedness.John C. Maraldo & Stephen C. Rowe - 1998 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 18:261.
  9.  2
    The Identity of the Kyoto School: A Critical Analysis.John C. Maraldo - 2018 - In Masakatsu Fujita (ed.), The Philosophy of the Kyoto School. Springer Singapore. pp. 253-268.
    In the past three decades in the West, literature about the Kyoto School and translations of its writings have proliferated. Yet the very scholarship that perpetuates the name has also created confusion about its reference. Which thinkers belong to the “Kyoto School”? What do they have in common? Do they represent something we can call Eastern philosophy, which pursues a way of thinking fundamentally different from that of the West? Is the core of that alternative philosophy, or alternative rationality, a (...)
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  10.  2
    The “Philosophy” in Japanese Buddhist Philosophy.John C. Maraldo - 2019 - In Gereon Kopf (ed.), The Dao Companion to Japanese Buddhist Philosophy. Springer. pp. 53-69.
    The chapters in this book focus on a phenomenon that is named by a conjunction of three terms: Japanese, Buddhist, philosophy. Each of these terms implies a distinction demarcating one domain of inquiry from other related domains: Japanese as distinct from Chinese, Korean, or Indian; Buddhist as distinct from Confucian or Shintō; and philosophy as distinct from religion or psychology. Each of these terms, the three in question as well as their contrasts, reflects a distinctly modern category that abstracts from (...)
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  11.  1
    7. Between Individual and Communal, Subject and Object, Self and Other: Mediating Watsuji Tetsurō’s Hermeneutics.John C. Maraldo - 2002 - In Michael F. Marra (ed.), Japanese Hermeneutics: Current Debates on Aesthetics and Interpretation. University of Hawai'i Press. pp. 76-86.
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