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John J. Compton [21]John Compton [9]
  1.  32
    The Persistence of the Problem of Freedom.John J. Compton - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):95 - 115.
    A CONCERN TO UNDERSTAND THE POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITS of human freedom is as old as philosophy. Yet the question whether and in what sense human beings are free agents still provokes heated debate. Even a century ago, as William James began his discussion of the issue, he wondered, with some bemusement, whether there could possibly be any “juice” left in it! Happily, he concluded that there was still more to be said, but his eloquent defense of free will failed to (...)
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  2.  48
    Phenomenology and the philosophy of nature.John J. Compton - 1988 - Man and World 21 (1):65-89.
    Despite Platonism's unquestioned claim to being one of the most influential movements in the history of philosophy, for a long time the conventional wisdom was that Platonists of late antiquity, or Neoplatonists, were so focused on otherworldly metaphysics that they simply neglected any serious study of the sensible world, which after all is 'merely' an image of the intelligible world. Only recently has this conventional wisdom begun to be dispelled. In fact, it is precisely because these thinkers did see the (...)
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  3.  64
    Reinventing the Philosophy of Nature.John J. Compton - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (1):3 - 28.
    PHILOSOPHY of nature is not currently considered standard fare in philosophy. Rather than the title of an area of inquiry, it has become the name of an isolated historical phenomenon—the Naturphilosophie of Schelling, Goethe, and Hegel, or a label for some school doctrine—the continuing tradition built upon the first books of Aristotle’s Physics or the newer one rooted in Whitehead’s Process and Reality. Philosophers do not typically see these systems of thought in terms of a common problematic, certainly not one (...)
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  4.  22
    Some Contributions of Existential Phenomenology to the Philosophy of Natural Science.John J. Compton - 1988 - American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (2):99 - 113.
  5.  62
    Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, and Human Freedom.John J. Compton - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (10):577-588.
  6.  22
    Nature, Truth, and Value: Exploring the Thinking of Frederick Ferrz.George Allan, Merle Allshouse, Harley Chapman, John B. Cobb, John Compton, Donald A. Crosby, Paul T. Durbin, Barbara Meister Ferré, Frederick Ferré, Frank B. Golley, Joseph Grange, John Granrose, David Ray Griffin, David Keller, Eugene Thomas Long, Elisabethe Segars McRae, Leslie A. Muray, William L. Power, James F. Salmon, Hans Julius Schneider, Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Udo E. Simonis, Donald Wayne Viney & Clark Wolf (eds.) - 2005 - Lexington Books.
    In this thorough compendium, nineteen accomplished scholars explore, in some manner the values they find inherent in the world, their nature, and revelence through the thought of Frederick Ferré. These essays, informed by the insights of Ferré and coming from manifold perspectives—ethics, philosophy, theology, and environmental studies, advance an ambitious challenge to current intellectual and scholarly fashions.
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  7.  61
    Nature, Truth, and Value: Exploring the Thinking of Frederick Ferrz.George Allan, Merle Allshouse, Harley Chapman, John B. Cobb, John Compton, Donald A. Crosby, Paul T. Durbin, Barbara Meister Ferré, Frederick Ferré, Frank B. Golley, Joseph Grange, John Granrose, David Ray Griffin, David Keller, Eugene Thomas Long, Elisabethe Segars McRae, Leslie A. Muray, William L. Power, James F. Salmon, Hans Julius Schneider, Dr Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Udo E. Simonis, Donald Wayne Viney & Clark Wolf (eds.) - 2005 - Lexington Books.
    In this thorough compendium, nineteen accomplished scholars explore, in some manner the values they find inherent in the world, their nature, and revelence through the thought of Frederick FerrZ. These essays, informed by the insights of FerrZ and coming from manifold perspectives—ethics, philosophy, theology, and environmental studies, advance an ambitious challenge to current intellectual and scholarly fashions.
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  8.  48
    An evaluation: Speaking, meaning and being.John Compton - 1968 - World Futures 7 (2):59-66.
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  9.  10
    Ecological Health: Ethics as the Starting Place.John Compton & Keith Meador - 2022 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 65 (4):540-547.
    ABSTRACT:When considering the health and flourishing of humans and human communities, we cannot ignore that we are constitutively bound to the health of ecosystems of which we are a part. As such, global climate change is a central concern for health care and bioethics. Addressing the complex and interrelated realities bound up with global climate change requires a multifaceted and integrated approach from diverse academic and professional disciplines and perspectives. This essay offers a brief conceptual framing of Vanderbilt University Medical (...)
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  10.  19
    Hare, Husserl, and Philosophic Discovery.John J. Compton - 1964 - Dialogue 3 (1):42-51.
  11.  61
    Human Science, Human Action, and Human Nature.John J. Compton - 1979 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 28:39-61.
  12.  10
    Human Science, Human Action, and Human Nature.John J. Compton - 1979 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 28:39-61.
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  13.  23
    Marjorie Grene and the Phenomenon of Life.John J. Compton - 1984 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:354 - 364.
    Marjorie Grene's work expresses the conviction that what is called "the new philosophy of science" will not become viable until it is rooted in an understanding of the knower and the known which breaks with the familiar Cartesian dualisms. In order to provide this understanding, she has sought to restore central significance to the phenomenon of life -- to the distinctive ways in which animals, including human beings, perceive and act in their worlds. It is argued that her fundamental premise (...)
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  14.  52
    Merleau-ponty's metaphorical philosophy.John J. Compton - 1993 - Research in Phenomenology 23 (1):221-226.
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  15.  37
    On the Sense of there being a Moral Sense of Nature.John Compton - 1986 - The Personalist Forum 2 (1):38-55.
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  16.  28
    Phenomenology as a philosophy of science.John Compton - 1967 - World Futures 6 (2):81-85.
  17.  23
    Responsibility and agency.John J. Compton - 1973 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 11 (1-2):83-89.
  18.  4
    Responsibility and Agency.John J. Compton - 1973 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 11 (1-2):83-89.
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  19.  12
    Samuel Enoch Stumpf 1918-1998.John J. Compton - 1998 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 72 (2):124 - 125.
  20. Sarte, Merleau-ponty, and human freedom.John J. Compton - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (10):577-588.
  21.  45
    Toward an ontology of value.John J. Compton - 1958 - Philosophical Quarterly 8 (31):157-170.
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  22.  15
    Understanding science.John J. Compton - 1962 - Dialectica 16 (2):155-176.
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  23.  75
    Report on recent developments in the philosophy of quantum mechanics.Henry Margenau & John Compton - 1949 - Synthese 8 (1):260 - 271.
  24.  26
    God and Contemporary Science. [REVIEW]John J. Compton - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):196-197.
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  25.  9
    James Schmidt, "Maurice Merleau-ponty: Between phenomenology and structuralism". [REVIEW]John J. Compton - 1987 - History and Theory 26 (3):365.
  26. One of the central tasks for any philosophy of science is to assess the conditions and limits of scientific objectivity. What should we take this sort of objectivity to mean? How is it to be legitimated? How can it be achieved? Is it even possible in principle, given the human condition? These questions are of perennial concern, of course, but in recent discussion they have become acute. They. [REVIEW]John J. Compton - 1992 - In D. P. Chattopadhyaya, Lester Embree & Jitendranath Mohanty (eds.), Phenomenology and Indian philosophy. New Delhi: Indian Council of Philosophical Research in association with Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. pp. 185.
  27. Review. [REVIEW]John Compton - 1996 - History and Theory 35:224-234.
     
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  28.  27
    The Natural and the Normative. [REVIEW]John J. Compton - 1992 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (2):406-408.
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  29.  14
    The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception from Kant to Helmholtz. [REVIEW]John J. Compton - 1992 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (2):406-407.
    This is a beautifully clear, detailed, and compelling revision of the received histories of late eighteenth and nineteenth-century German psychology and philosophy of mind. It focuses on the seemingly constant tension between what Hatfield calls normativism and naturalism. Participants in this story are often both philosophers and psychologists, in a mix in which it is difficult to see the differences. Hatfield presents us with the formative history of our present, uneasy distinction between "philosophical" and "psychological" approaches to the mind.
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