Order:
  1.  18
    When and How to Satisfice: An Experimental Investigation.John D. Hey, Yudistira Permana & Nuttaporn Rochanahastin - 2017 - Theory and Decision 83 (3):337-353.
    This paper is about satisficing behaviour. Rather tautologically, this is when decision-makers are satisfied with achieving some objective, rather than in obtaining the best outcome. The term was coined by Simon, and has stimulated many discussions and theories. Prominent amongst these theories are models of incomplete preferences, models of behaviour under ambiguity, theories of rational inattention, and search theories. Most of these, however, seem to lack an answer to at least one of two key questions: when should the decision-maker satisfice; (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2. A Test of the Principle of Optimality.John D. Hey & Enrica Carbone - 2001 - Theory and Decision 50 (3):263-281.
    This paper reports on an experimental test of the Principle of Optimality in dynamic decision problems. This Principle, which states that the decision-maker should always choose the optimal decision at each stage of the decision problem, conditional on behaving optimally thereafter, underlies many theories of optimal dynamic decision making, but is normally difficult to test empirically without knowledge of the decision-maker's preference function. In the experiment reported here we use a new experimental procedure to get round this difficulty, which also (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  24
    What Price Compromise?John Bone, John D. Hey & John Suckling - 2014 - Theory and Decision 77 (3):359-376.
    This paper identifies, and tests experimentally, a prediction of the Nash bargaining axioms that may appear counterintuitive. The context is a simple bargaining problem in which two players have to agree a choice from three alternatives. One alternative favours one player and a second favours the other. The third is an apparently reasonable compromise, but is in fact precluded as an agreed choice by the Nash axioms. Experimental results show that agreement on this third alternative occurs rather often. Our subjects’ (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  3
    Editorial: Foundations of Utility and Risk Conference.John D. Hey & Chris Starmer - 2020 - Theory and Decision 88 (1):1-3.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  24
    Guest Editor’s Introduction.John D. Hey - 2008 - Theory and Decision 64 (2-3):103-108.
    Since our visual perception of physical things essentially involves our identifying objects by their colours, any theory of visual perception must contain some account of the colours of things. The central problem with colour has to do with relating our normal, everyday colour perceptions to what science, i.e. physics, teaches us about physical objects and their qualities. Although we perceive colours as categorical surface properties of things, colour perceptions are explained by introducing physical properties like reflectance profiles or dispositions to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  9
    Ion Dynamical correctIons to the Holtsmark Theory of Spectral Line Broadening.John D. Hey - 1976 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 42 (1):81-101.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark