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  1.  29
    Equality of Talent: John E. Roemer.John E. Roemer - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (2):151-188.
    If one is an egalitarian, what should one want to equalize? Opportunities or outcomes? Resources or welfare? These positions are usually conceived to be very different. I argue in this paper that the distinction is misconceived: the only coherent conception of resource equality implies welfare equality, in an appropriately abstract description of the problem. In this section, I motivate the program which the rest of the paper carries out.
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  2.  84
    A Public Ownership Resolution of the Tragedy of the Commons*: JOHN E. ROEMER.John E. Roemer - 1989 - Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (2):74-92.
    Imagine a society of fisherfolk, who, in the state of nature, fish on a lake of finite size. Fishing on the lake is characterized by decreasing returns to scale in labor, because the lake's finite size imply that each successive hour of fishing labor is less effective than the previous one, as the remaining fish become less dense in the lake. In the state of nature, the lake is commonly owned: each fishes as much as he pleases, and, we might (...)
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  3.  7
    A Future for Socialism.John E. Roemer - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):462-464.
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  4.  53
    Egalitarianism, Responsibility, and Information: John E. Roemer.John E. Roemer - 1987 - Economics and Philosophy 3 (2):215-244.
    Radical and liberal theories of egalitarianism are distinguished, in large part, by the differing degrees to which they hold people responsible for their own well-being. The most liberal or individualistic theory calls for equality of opportunity. Once such “starting gate equality,” as Dworkin calls it, is guaranteed, then any final outcome is justified, provided certain rules, such as voluntary trading, are observed. At the other pole, the most radical egalitarianism calls for equality of welfare. In between these two extremes are (...)
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  5. Theories of Distributive Justice.John E. Roemer - 1997 - Mind 106 (424):795-797.
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  6.  47
    Providing Equal Educational Opportunity: Public Vs. Voucher Schools*: JOHN E. ROEMER.John E. Roemer - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (1):291-309.
    All advanced societies maintain a commitment to equal educational opportunity, which they claim to implement through a public school system that is charged toprovide all children with an education up to a state-enforced standard. Indeed, what public schools do, even in the best of circumstances, is to provide all children with a more or less equal exposure to educational inputs, rather than to guarantee them equal educational attainment. Children, as the schools receive them, differ markedly in their docility — due (...)
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  7.  9
    Defending Equality of Opportunity.John E. Roemer - 2003 - The Monist 86 (2):261-282.
    The theory of equal opportunity as I have expounded it in Roemer uses a language comprising five words: objective, circumstance, type, effort, and policy. The objective is the kind of outcome or well-being or advantage for whose acquisition one wishes to equalize opportunities, in a given population. Circumstances are the set of environmental influences, beyond the individual’s control, that affect his or her chances of acquiring the objective. A type is the group of individuals in the population with a given (...)
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  8.  3
    A Challenge to Neo-Lockeanism.John E. Roemer - 1988 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):697-710.
    The neo-Lockean justification of the highly unequal distribution of income in capitalist societies is based upon two key premises: that people are the rightful owners of their labor and talents, and that the external world was, in the state of nature, unowned, and therefore up for grabs by people, who could rightfully appropriate parts of it subject to a ‘Lockean proviso.’ The argument is presented by Nozick. Counter-proposals to Nozick’s, for the most part, have either denied the premise that people (...)
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  9. Second Thoughts on Property Relations and Exploitation.John E. Roemer - 1989 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 15:257.
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