Results for 'John F. Zipp'

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  1.  1
    The Power of Numbers in Influencing Hiring Decisions.John F. Zipp, Penny L. Crumpton & Janice D. Yoder - 1989 - Gender and Society 3 (2):269-276.
    This article explores the influence that the proportion of women in a department has on hiring decisions in the field of psychology. A sample of advertisers from the APA Monitor was asked to identify the gender of the candidate hired. Hiring patterns were the same for men and women hirers in nonacademic organizations, as each favored male candidates. In academic hiring, women candidates were favored in departments with moderate female representation. This finding counters claims that women are hired by departments (...)
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  2.  60
    Agency and Deontic Logic.John F. Horty - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    John Horty effectively develops deontic logic (the logic of ethical concepts like obligation and permission) against the background of a formal theory of agency. He incorporates certain elements of decision theory to set out a new deontic account of what agents ought to do under various conditions over extended periods of time. Offering a conceptual rather than technical emphasis, Horty's framework allows a number of recent issues from moral theory to be set out clearly and discussed from a uniform (...)
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  3.  14
    A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy.John F. W. Herschel - 1830 - University of Chicago Press.
  4. The Metaphysical Thought of Thomas Aquinas: From Finite Being to Uncreated Being.John F. Wippel - 2000 - The Catholic University of America Press.
    Written by a highly respected scholar of Thomas Aquinas's writings, this volume offers a comprehensive presentation of Aquinas's metaphysical thought. It is based on a thorough examination of his texts organized according to the philosophical order as he himself describes it rather than according to the theological order. -/- In the introduction and opening chapter, John F. Wippel examines Aquinas's view on the nature of metaphysics as a philosophical science and the relationship of its subject to divine being. Part (...)
     
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  5. The Cognitive Unconscious.John F. Kihlstrom - 1987 - Science 237:1445-1452.
  6.  24
    John F. Covaleskie 83.John F. Covaleskie - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
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  7.  12
    John F. Crosby, A. Schopf, Brigitte Weisshaupt, Charles Hartshome.John F. Crosby, A. Schopf, Brigitte Weisshaupt & Charles Hartshome - 1988 - Philosophie Et Culture: Actes du XVIIe Congrès Mondial de Philosophie 5:608-608.
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  8.  19
    John F. Kennedy on Education.John F. Kennedy & William T. O'hara - 1966 - British Journal of Educational Studies 14 (3):105-106.
  9.  50
    Infinite Regresses of Justification and of Explanation.John F. Post - 1980 - Philosophical Studies 38 (1):31 - 52.
  10. Scientific Law: A Perspectival Account. [REVIEW]John F. Halpin - 2003 - Erkenntnis 58 (2):137-168.
    An acceptable empiricist account of laws of nature would havesignificant implications for a number of philosophical projects. For example, such an account may vitiate argumentsthat the fundamental constants of nature are divinelydesigned so that laws produce a life permittinguniverse. On an empiricist account, laws do not produce the universe but are designed by us to systematize theevents of a universe which does in fact contain life; so any ``fine tuning'' of natural law has a naturalistic explanation.But there are problems for (...)
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  11. The Emotional Unconscious.John F. Kihlstrom, Shelagh Mulvaney, Betsy A. Tobias & Irene P. Tobis - 2000 - In Eric Eich, John F. Kihlstrom, Gordon H. Bower, Joseph P. Forgas & Paula M. Niedenthal (eds.), Cognition and Emotion. Oxford University Press. pp. 30-86.
  12. Thomas Aquinas and the Condemnation of 1277.John F. Wippel - 1995 - Modern Schoolman 72 (2-3):233-272.
  13.  49
    Peirce's Tutorial on Existential Graphs.John F. Sowa - 2011 - Semiotica 2011 (186):347-394.
    In his formal papers on existential graphs , Peirce tended to obscure the simplicity of EGs with distracting digressions. In MS 514, however, he presented his simplest introduction to the EG syntax, semantics, and rules of inference. This article reproduces Peirce's original words and diagrams with further commentary, explanations, and examples. Unlike the syntax-based approach of most current textbooks, Peirce's method addresses the semantic issues of logic in a way that can be transferred to any notation. The concluding section shows (...)
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  14. Nomic Necessity and Empiricism.John F. Halpin - 1999 - Noûs 33 (4):630-643.
    character. So, we have learned from early on that laws are meant to portray a sort of necessity in nature. The comings and goings described by law are not merely contingently related. Rather, it is part of the concept of law that these events are connected in some significant way: "nomically" connected. One important desideratum for an account of law, then, is that it respect and perhaps explain this modal character.
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  15. Lewis, Thau, and Hall on Chance and the Best-System Account of Law.John F. Halpin - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (2):349-360.
    August 16, 1997 David Lewis2 has long defended an account of scientific law acceptable even to an empiricist with significant metaphysical scruples. On this account, the laws are defined to be the consequences of the best system for axiomitizing all occurrent fact. Here "best system" means the set of sentences which yields the best combination of strength of descriptive content 3 with simplicity of exposition. And occurrent facts, the facts to be systematized, are roughly the particular facts about a localized (...)
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  16.  69
    Truth in Thomas Aquinas.John F. Wippel - 1946 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (2):295 - 326.
    THOMAS AQUINAS IS WELL-KNOWN for having defended the view that truth consists of an adequation between the intellect and a thing. Perhaps no discussion of this within his literary corpus is better known than that offered in qu. 1 of his Disputed Questions on Truth. Even so, in addition to describing truth as an adequation of the intellect and a thing, he there considers a number of other definitions. Most importantly, he develops a notion of truth of being along with (...)
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  17. Reasons as Defaults.John F. Horty - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    In this volume, John Horty brings to bear his work in logic to present a framework that allows for answers to key questions about reasons and reasoning, namely: What are reasons, and how do they support actions or conclusions?
     
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  18. The Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance Debate.John F. Mahon - 1997 - Business and Society 36 (1):5-31.
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  19.  49
    The Reality of Nonexisting Possibles According to Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and Godfrey of Fontaines.John F. Wippel - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (4):729 - 758.
    IN THIS study I shall concentrate on three leading philosophical and theological thinkers of the thirteenth century: Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and Godfrey of Fontaines. Of these, Thomas Aquinas is surely the best known. But I have selected these three because their discussions of nonexisting possibles are sufficiently different from one another to illustrate some of the major solutions proposed to this issue at that time.
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  20.  45
    Thomas Aquinas on Creatures as Causes of Esse.John F. Wippel - 2000 - International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (2):197-213.
  21. Essence and Existence.John F. Wippel - 1982 - In Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny & Jan Pinborg (eds.), Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 385--410.
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  22. Legitimizing Chance: The Best-System Approach to Probabilistic Laws in Physical Theory.John F. Halpin - 1994 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (3):317 – 338.
  23.  5
    Comment on Teller.John F. Post - 1984 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (S1):163-167.
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  24.  65
    What is the Logical Form of Probability Assignment in Quantum Mechanics?John F. Halpin - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (1):36-60.
    The nature of quantum mechanical probability has often seemed mysterious. To shed some light on this topic, the present paper analyzes the logical form of probability assignment in quantum mechanics. To begin the paper, I set out and criticize several attempts to analyze the form. I go on to propose a new form which utilizes a novel, probabilistic conditional and argue that this proposal is, overall, the best rendering of the quantum mechanical probability assignments. Finally, quantum mechanics aside, the discussion (...)
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  25. Implicit and Explicit Memory and Learning.John F. Kihlstrom, Jennifer Dorfman & Lillian Park - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 525--539.
    Learning and memory are inextricably intertwined. The capacity for learning presupposes an ability to retain the knowledge acquired through experience, while memory stores the background knowledge against which new learning takes place. During the dark years of radical behaviorism, when the concept of memory was deemed too mentalistic to be a proper subject of scientific study, research on human memory took the form of research on verbal learning (Anderson, 2000; Schwartz & Reisberg, 1991).
     
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  26.  41
    Cornelio Fabro on the Distinction and Composition of Essence and Esse in the Metaphysics of Thomas Aquinas.John F. Wippel - 2015 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (3):573-592.
    This article focuses on Cornelio Fabro’s understanding and presentation of Thomas Aquinas’s argumentation for a real distinction and composition of essence and an act of existing in finite beings, a theory that is closely connected with Aquinas’s notion of transcendental participation. It examines Fabro’s division of Aquinas’s arguments into five gradually developing major approaches. Fabro offers an interesting interpretation of the argument offered by the youthful Aquinas in the often discussed De ente et essentia, c. 4, and finds that in (...)
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  27. Public Speaking as a Liberal Art.John F. Wilson & Carroll C. Arnold - 1969 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 2 (2):114-115.
     
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  28.  5
    The Psychological Unconscious and the Self.John F. Kihlstrom - 1993 - In G. R. Bock & James L. Marsh (eds.), Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 174). pp. 147--167.
  29. Metacognition: Knowing About Knowing.John F. Metcalfe & P. Shimamura - 1994 - MIT Press.
  30. Chapter Eighteen Computers Teaching Ethics: Killing Three Birds with One Stone? John F Hulpke, Aid an Kelly, and Michelle To.John F. Hulpke - 2007 - In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 253.
     
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  31.  41
    Science1 and Religion: Their Logical Similarity: JOHN. F. MILLER.John F. Miller - 1969 - Religious Studies 5 (1):49-68.
    In his “Theology and Falsification” Professor Antony Flew challenges the sophisticated religious believer to state under what conceivable occurrences he would concede that there really is no God Who loves mankind: ‘Just what would have to happen not merely to tempt but also, logically and rightly, to entitle us to say “God does not love us” or even “God does not exist”? I therefore put…the simple central questions, “What would have to occur or to have occurred to constitute for you (...)
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  32. Truthmaker.John F. Fox - 1987 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 65 (2):188 – 207.
  33.  24
    Godfrey of Fontaines on Intension and Remission of Accidental Forms.John F. Wippel - 1979 - Franciscan Studies 39 (1):316-355.
  34. Conscious, Subconscious, Unconscious: A Cognitive Perspective.John F. Kihlstrom - 1984 - In K. S. Bowers & D. Meichenbaum (eds.), The Unconscious Reconsidered. Wiley.
  35.  47
    The Possibility of a Christian Philosophy: A Thomistic Perspective.John F. Wippel - 1984 - Faith and Philosophy 1 (3):272-290.
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  36.  26
    The Miraculous Conception of Counterfactuals.John F. Halpin - 1991 - Philosophical Studies 63 (3):271 - 290.
  37.  28
    The Faces of Existence: An Essay in Nonreductive Metaphysics.JOHN F. POST - 1987 - Cornell University Press.
  38. The Politics of Moderation: An Interpretation of Plato's Republic.John F. Wilson - 1984 - University Press of America.
  39. Being.John F. Wippel - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
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  40.  5
    Maritain and Aquinas on Our Discovery of Being.John F. Wippel - 2014 - Studia Gilsoniana 3:415-443.
    The author presents and compares Maritain’s and Aquinas’s accounts of our discovery of being as existing; and of being as being. He finds that especially in his final discussion of how one discovers being as being, Maritain’s account suffers greatly from the absence of any appeal to Aquinas’s negative judgment of separation and also from the omission of reference to the role of judgments of existence in one’s discovery of a premetaphysical notion of being. Wippel finds no evidence in Aquinas’s (...)
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  41.  64
    Thomas Aquinas's Derivation of the Aristotelian Categories (Predicaments).John F. Wippel - 1987 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (1):13-34.
  42. Aquina's Route to the Real Distinction: A Note on "De Ente Et Essentia".John F. Wippel - 1979 - The Thomist 43 (2):279.
     
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  43.  32
    Godfrey of Fontaines and the Act-Potency Axiom.John F. Wippel - 1973 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (3):299-317.
  44. The Deliberative Stit: A Study of Action, Omission, Ability, and Obligation. [REVIEW]John F. Horty & Nuel Belnap - 1995 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 24 (6):583 - 644.
  45.  11
    Response: Comment on Teller.John F. Post - 1984 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (S1):163-167.
  46. John F. Quinn: "The Historical Constitution of St. Bonaventure's Philosophy". [REVIEW]John Wippel - 1980 - The Thomist 44 (1):143.
  47. The Five Ways.John F. Wippel - 2002 - In Brian Davies (ed.), Thomas Aquinas: Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Oup Usa.
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  48. Reasoning with Moral Conflicts.John F. Horty - 2003 - Noûs 37 (4):557–605.
    Let us say that a normative conflict is a situation in which an agent ought to perform an action A, and also ought to perform an action B, but in which it is impossible for the agent to perform both A and B. Not all normative conflicts are moral conflicts, of course. It may be that the agent ought to perform the action A for reasons of personal generosity, but ought to perform the action B for reasons of prudence: perhaps (...)
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  49.  33
    A Clash of Intuitions: The Current State of Nonmonotonic Multiple Inheritance Systems.Richmond H. Thomason & John F. Horty - unknown
    Early attempts at combining multiple inheritance with nonmonotonic reasoning were based on straightforward extensions of tree-structured inheritance systems, and were theoretically unsound. In The Mathcmat~'cs of Inheritance Systcrns, or TMOIS, Touretzky described two problems these systems cannot handle: reasoning in the presence of true but redundant assertions, and coping with ambiguity. TMOIS provided a definition and analysis of a theoretically sound multiple inheritance system, accom-.
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  50. Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism.John F. Boler - 1963 - Seattle, University of Washington Press.
    IN 1903, commenting on an article he had written more than thirty years before, Charles Peirce said that he had changed his mind on many issues at least a half-dozen times but had "never been able to think differently on that question of nominalism and realism" (1.20). For anyone acquainted with Peirce's writings, this remark alone could justify a study of "that question.".
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