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  1.  28
    Rational Choice and Social Theory.Debra Satz & John Ferejohn - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):71-87.
  2. Democracy and Social Choice.Jules L. Coleman & John Ferejohn - 1986 - Ethics 97 (1):6-25.
  3. Rational Choice and Social Theory.Debra Satz & John Ferejohn - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):71-87.
  4.  10
    Unification, Universalism, and Rational Choice Theory.Debra Satz & John Ferejohn - 2017 - In Louis Putterman (ed.), The Rational Choice Controversy. Yale University Press. pp. 71-84.
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  5.  45
    Unification, Universalism, and Rational Choice Theory.John Ferejohn & Debra Satz - 1995 - Critical Review 9 (1-2):71-84.
    Green and Shapiro's critique of rational choice theory underestimates the value of unification and the necessity of universalism in science. The central place of intentionality in social life makes both unification and universalism feasible norms in social science. However, ?universalism? in social science may be partial, in that the independence hypothesis?that the causal mechanism governing action is context independent?may hold only locally in certain classes of choice domains.
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  6. Symposium on Explanations and Social Ontology 1: Rational Choice Theory and Social Explanation.John Ferejohn - 2002 - Economics and Philosophy 18 (2):211-234.
    In the Common Mind, Pettit argues that rational choice theory cannot provide genuine causal accounts of action. A genuine causal explanation of intentional action must track how people actually deliberate to arrive at action. And, deliberation is necessarily enculturated or situated “. . . we take human agents to reason their way to action, using the concepts that are available to them in the currency of their culture” (p. 220). When deciding how to act, “. . . people find their (...)
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  7.  59
    Pettit’s Republic.John Ferejohn - 2001 - The Monist 84 (1):77-97.
    In Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government, Philip Pettit seeks to revive republicanism not only as a critical perspective on contemporary political life but as a guiding principle for the design of modern political institutions. His conception of republicanism sees it as aimed at securing a kind of liberty: freedom from domination, which he defines as dependence on the arbitrary will of another. Pettit contrasts his conception of liberty with the notion, traced to Hobbes, Bentham and “enlightenment” thinkers, of (...)
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  8. Conversability and Deliberation.John Ferejohn - 2007 - In Michael Smith, Robert Goodin & Geoffrey Geoffrey (eds.), Common Minds. Oxford University Press. pp. 121.
     
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  9. Commentary: Tolerant Institutions.John Ferejohn - 2008 - In Russel Hardin, Ingrid Crepell & Stephen Macedo (eds.), Toleration on Trial. Lexington Books. pp. 73.
  10.  1
    Pettit’s Republic.John Ferejohn - 2001 - The Monist 84 (1):77-97.
    In Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government, Philip Pettit seeks to revive republicanism not only as a critical perspective on contemporary political life but as a guiding principle for the design of modern political institutions. His conception of republicanism sees it as aimed at securing a kind of liberty: freedom from domination, which he defines as dependence on the arbitrary will of another. Pettit contrasts his conception of liberty with the notion, traced to Hobbes, Bentham and “enlightenment” thinkers, of (...)
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  11. Steven Brams, "Game Theory and Politics". [REVIEW]John Ferejohn - 1977 - Theory and Decision 8 (4):413.
     
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  12.  3
    Two Views of the City: Republicanism and Law.John Ferejohn - 2013 - In Andreas Niederberger & Philipp Schink (eds.), Republican Democracy: Liberty, Law and Politics. Edinburgh University Press.
    Republicans have traditionally opposed democracy, arguing that rule by a majority is a form of despotic or lawless rule, and liberalism due to its emphasis on private goods over public projects and shared or public interests. Today, however, republicanism is associated with certain kinds of ‘democratic’ institutions and deliberative practices, whereas democracy is considered a means of assuring significant liberal protections for individual freedom. This chapter examines the link between republicanism and the nature of law. It describes at least two (...)
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