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John Finnis [78]John M. Finnis [5]
  1.  12
    John Finnis (2011). Natural Law and Natural Rights. Oxford University Press UK.
    Natural Law and Natural Rights is widely recognised as a seminal contribution to the philosophy of law, and an essential reference point for all students of the subject. This new edition includes a substantial postscript by the author responding to thirty years of comment, criticism, and further work in the field.
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  2. John Finnis (1979). Natural Law and Natural Rights. Oxford University Press.
    This new edition includes a substantial postscript by the author, in which he responds to thirty years of discussion, criticism and further work in the field to ...
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  3. John Finnis (1998). Aquinas: Moral, Political, and Legal Theory. Oxford University Press.
    This launch volume in the Founders of Modern Political and Social Thought series presents a critical examination of Aquinas' thought, combining an accessible, historically-informed account of his work with an assessment of his central ideas and arguments. John Finnis presents a richly-documented critical review of Aquinas's thought on morality, politics, law, and method in social science. Unique in his coverage of Aquinas's primary and secondary texts and his own vigorous argumentation on many themes, the author focuses on the philosophy in (...)
     
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  4. John Finnis (1973). The Rights and Wrongs of Abortion: A Reply to Judith Thomson. Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (2):117-145.
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  5.  74
    John Finnis (1983). Fundamentals of Ethics. Clarendon Press.
    The main theme of this book is the challenge to ethics from philosophical scepticism and from contemporary forms of consequentialism.
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  6. John Finnis, Joseph Boyle & Germain Grisez (1988). Nuclear Deterrence, Morality and Realism. Clarendon Press.
    Nuclear deterrence requires objective ethical analysis. In providing it, the authors face realities - the Soviet threat, possible nuclear holocaust, strategic imperatives - but they also unmask moral evasions - deterrence cannot be bluff, pure counterforce, the lesser (or greater) evil, or a step towards disarmament. They conclude that the deterrent is unjustifiable and examine the new question of conscience that this raises for everyone.
     
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  7. John Finnis (2003). Law and What I Truly Should Decide. American Journal of Jurisprudence 48 (1):107-129.
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  8.  32
    John Finnis (2011). Reason in Action. Oxford University Press.
    The essays in the volume range from foundational issues of meta-ethics to the practical application of natural law theory to ethical problems such as nuclear ...
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  9.  8
    John M. Finnis, Subsidiarity's Roots and History: Some Observations.
    Subsidiarity, i.e., “the principle of subsidiarity,” i.e., “the principle of subsidiary function/responsibility,” i.e., the principle that it is unjust for a higher authority to usurp the self-governing authority that lower authorities, acting in the service of their own members, rightly have over those members, is a presumptive and defeasible, not an absolute, principle. But it excludes any general policy or aim of assuming the control or managerial direction of lower groups. Its deepest rationale is the intrinsic desirability of self-direction, a (...)
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  10.  53
    John Finnis (2008). Marriage. The Monist 91 (3/4):388-406.
  11. John Finnis (1987). On Reason and Authority in Law's Empire. Law and Philosophy 6 (3):357 - 380.
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  12. John Finnis, Germain Grisez & Joseph Boyle (2001). «Direct» and «Indirect»: A Reply to Critics of Our Action Theory. The Thomist 65 (1):1-44.
     
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  13. John Finnis (2002). Natural Law: The Classical Theory. In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
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  14. John Finnis (1991). Moral Absolutes Tradition, Revision, and Truth.
     
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  15. John Finnis (2005). “The Thing I Am”: Personal Identity in Aquinas and Shakespeare. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):250-282.
    The four kinds of explanation identified by Aquinas at the beginning of his commentary on Aristotle's Ethics are deployed to show that the identity of the human person is sui generis and mysterious, even though each of its elements is more or less readily accessible to our understanding. The essay attends particularly to the explorations by Aquinas and, with different techniques, by Shakespeare of the experience and understanding of one's lasting presence to oneself as one and the same bodily and (...)
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  16.  63
    John M. Finnis (1989). Law as Co-Ordination. Ratio Juris 2 (1):97-104.
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  17.  88
    John Finnis (1972). The Restoration of Retribution. Analysis 32 (4):131 - 135.
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  18.  97
    John Finnis (2008). Aquinas' Moral, Political, and Legal Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  19.  7
    John Finnis (2012). Equality and Differences. Solidarity: The Journal of Catholic Social Thought and Secular Ethics 2 (1):Article 1.
    Fifty years ago this year a legal practitioner turned military intelligencer turned philosopher, Herbert Hart, published The Concept of Law, still deservedly best-seller in thought about law. It presents law, especially common law and constitutionally ordered systems such as ours, as a social reality which results from the sharing of ideas and making of decisions that, for good or evil, establish rules of law which are what they are, whether just or unjust. But right at its centre is a chapter (...)
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  20. John Finnis (2001). Is Natural Law Theory Compatible with Limited Government? In Robert George (ed.), Natural Law, Liberalism, and Morality: Contemporary Essays. Oxford University Press.
     
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  21. John M. Finnis & D. Phil (1970). Natural Law and Unnatural Acts. Heythrop Journal 11 (4):365–387.
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  22. John Finnis (2004). Natural Law: The Classical Tradition. In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  23.  16
    John Finnis (2015). Grounding Human Rights in Natural Law. American Journal of Jurisprudence 60 (2):199-225.
  24.  47
    John Finnis (1999). Natural Law and the Ethics of Discourse. Ratio Juris 12 (4):354-373.
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  25.  62
    John Finnis (2013). The Priority of Persons Revisited. American Journal of Jurisprudence 58 (1):45-62.
    This essay, in the context of a conference on justice, reviews and reaffirms the main theses of “The Priority of Persons” (2000), and supplements them with the benefit of hindsight in six theses. The wrongness of Roe v. Wade goes wider than was indicated. The secularist scientistic or naturalist dimension of the reigning contemporary ideology is inconsistent with the spiritual reality manifested in every word or gesture of its proponents. The temporal continuity of the existence of human persons and their (...)
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  26.  14
    John Finnis (2008). On Hart's Ways : Law as Reason and as Fact. In Matthew H. Kramer (ed.), American Journal of Jurisprudence. Oxford University Press. pp. 25-53.
    This address at the Hart Centenary Conference in Cambridge in July 2007 reflects on foundational elements in Hart's method in legal philosophy. It argues that his understanding of what it is to adopt an internal point of view was flawed by (a) inattention to the difference between descriptive history (or biography or detection) and descriptive general theory of human affairs, (b) inattention to practical reason as argument from premises, some factual but others normative (evaluative) in their content, and (c) relative (...)
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  27.  10
    John Finnis (forthcoming). On Anscombe’s “Royal Road” to True Belief in Advance. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
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  28. John Finnis (2010). Law as Idea, Ideal and Duty. Jurisprudence 1 (2):245-251.
    Law centrally or archetypically is a moral idea, but not so much an ideal as a requirement of justice. Studying it contemplatively, as Simmonds's admirable Law as a Moral Idea does, tends to truncate the investigation of law's moral character and to obscure the extent to which jurisprudence can and should be a critical moral inquiry. The book's virtues—especially its critiques of Hart, Raz and Kramer—outweigh these two objections and the further, lesser objection that the distinctions it draws between its (...)
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  29. John Finnis (1991). Object and Intention in Moral Judgments According to Aquinas. The Thomist 55 (1):1-27.
     
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  30. Germain Grisez, Joseph Boyle, John Finnis & William E. May (1988). ''Every Marital Act Ought to Be Open to New Life'': Toward a Clearer Understanding. The Thomist 52 (3):365-426.
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  31. John Finnis (1995). Law, Morality, and "Sexual Orientation". Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 9 (1):11-40.
  32. John Finnis, Natural Law Theories. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  33.  5
    John Finnis (2007). Grounds of Law and Legal Theory: A Response. Legal Theory 13 (3-4):315-344.
    Linking theses of Plato, Wittgenstein, and Weber, section I argues that identification of central cases and settling of focal meanings depend upon the theorist's purpose and, in the case of theory about human affairs—theory adequately attentive to the four irreducible orders in which human persons live and act—upon the purposes for which we intelligibly and intelligently act. Among these purposes, primacy is to be accorded to purposes which are, as best the theorist can judge, reasonable and fit to be adopted (...)
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  34.  94
    John Finnis, On 'Public Reason'.
    'Public reason' in Rawls's stipulated usage signifies propositions that can legitimately be used in deliberating on and deciding fundamental issues of political life and legislation because they are propositions which all citizens may reasonably be expected to endorse: their use is therefore fair (respects the moral principle of reciprocity) and preserves the public peace which is at risk from contests between comprehensive doctrines, contests exemplified by wars of religion. This attractive set of suggestions is ruined by irresoluable ambiguities, truncation of (...)
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  35.  8
    John Finnis, On the Practical Meaning of Secularism.
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  36.  4
    John Finnis (2016). On Anscombe’s “Royal Road” to True Belief. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (2):347-368.
    This essay draws upon observations made by Elizabeth Anscombe regarding, respectively, the mutual need of scientific theory and philosophical analysis, the manner in which human rationality may show itself as a principle of bodily action, and the fulfilment in the New Testament of the central promise of Hebrew scripture. It examines something of the nature of material organization and the incorporation and subsumption of that into living systems, among which emerges the human, rational form of life. Noting the distinctness of (...)
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  37.  30
    Roger Scruton & John Finnis (1989). Corporate Persons. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 63 (1):239 - 274.
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  38.  70
    John Finnis, Anscombe's Essays.
    This review article, now published in the National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly, Spring 2009, focuses on several themes in the two volumes, posthumously selected, edited and published by a daughter and son-in-law, of G.E.M. Anscombe’s philosophical and philosophical/theological essays. Of first importance is her philosophical explication and defence of the spirituality of human life, as manifested in even the simplest act such as pointing to something as an example of colour rather than of shape. With that is connected her defence of (...)
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  39.  67
    John Finnis (2008). Reason, Revelation, Universality and Particularity in Ethics. American Journal of Jurisprudence 53 (1):23-48.
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  40.  22
    John Finnis & Elizabeth Anscombe (2013). Intention and Side Effects. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press. pp. 93.
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  41. John Finnis (2003). Natural Law Lecture 2003: Law and What I Truly Should Decide. American Journal of Jurisprudence 48:107-130.
     
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  42.  34
    John Finnis (1990). Incoherence and Consequentialism (or Proportionalism). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):271-277.
  43.  20
    John Finnis (2012). Natural Law Theory: Its Past and its Present. American Journal of Jurisprudence 57 (1):81-101.
    The past in which theory of this kind had its origins is notably similar to the present. For this is theory–practical theory–which articulates a critique of critiques, and the critiques it criticizes, rejects and replaces have much in common whether one looks at them in their fifth century B.C. Hellenic (Sophistic) or their modern (Enlightenment, Nietzschean or postmodern) forms.
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  44. John Finnis (1994). Beyond the Encyclical. In John Wilkins (ed.), Considering Veritatis Splendor. Pilgrim Press. pp. 75.
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  45. John Finnis (2007). The Ethics of War and Peace in the Catholic Natural Law Tradition. In John Aloysius Coleman (ed.), Christian Political Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  46.  13
    John M. Finnis, Natural Law and the "Is"-"Ought" Question: An Invitation to Professor Veatch.
    This Article invites Professor Henry Veatch to consider some of Finnis' previous work. Finnis asserts that his work presents "serious questions" for those who interpret Aristotle and Acquinas in the way the Veatch does and invites Veatch to respond.
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  47.  7
    John Finnis, Freedom, Benefit and Understanding: Reflections on Laurence Claus's Critique of Authority.
    Written for a symposium in the University of San Diego Law School in September 2013 on Laurence Claus, Law’s Evolution and Human Understanding, this article appears in the final issue of volume 52 of the San Diego Law Review. With new illustrations and considerations suggested by the book, the article argues for a number of theses: “Because I/we say so” is never a reasonable ground or formulation of authoritative acts such as enactments or parental or other orders. The moral authority (...)
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  48.  17
    John Finnis (1984). Practical Reasoning, Human Goods and the End of Man. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 58:23-36.
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  49.  7
    John Finnis (2012). Its Past and Its Present. In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge.
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  50.  8
    John Finnis (2013). Capacity, Harm and Experience in the Life of Persons as Equals. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):281-283.
    This paper identifies and contests the thesis it takes to be the central premise of Giubilini and Minerva, ‘Why should the baby live?’, namely that rights, subjecthood and personhood have as a necessary condition that the undergoing of a harm be experienced. That thesis entails the repugnant or absurd conclusion that we do not have the right not to be killed in our sleep. The conclusion can be avoided by adding some premise or qualification about actual capacities for experience of (...)
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