14 found
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  1.  13
    Markets, Managers and Theory in Education.John Halliday - 1990 - Falmer Press.
    Introduction During the past ten years or so, there seems to have been a constant supply of statements, policies and arguments that assert or purport to ...
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  2.  26
    Political Liberalism and Citizenship Education: Towards Curriculum Reform.John Halliday - 1999 - British Journal of Educational Studies 47 (1):43 - 55.
    This paper is concerned with Rawls's (1993) account of an overlapping consensus and recent proposals to introduce citizenship education in parts of the UK. It is argued that both Rawls and the proposals mistake the significance and nature of such a consensus. Partly as a result of this mistake the proposals are insufficiently radical.
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  3.  19
    Quality in Education: Meaning and Prospects.John Halliday - 1994 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 26 (2):33–50.
  4.  5
    Context, Judgment, and Learning.John Halliday - 2002 - Educational Theory 52 (4):429-443.
  5.  17
    Reason, Education and Liberalism: Family Resemblance Within an Overlapping Consensus.John Halliday - 2001 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):225-234.
    This paper focuses on recent debates over the nature ofliberalism and its central feature of reason, both inside and outside ofeducational philosophy. Central ideas from Jonathan and Hirst contributeas do those from Rawls, Gadamer, Wittgenstein, Taylor, and Ackermantoward a less traditional contextualized and contingent view.
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  6.  25
    Who Wants to Learn Forever? Hyperbole and Difficulty with Lifelong Learning.John Halliday - 2003 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3/4):195-210.
    This paper addresses the issue of how lifelonglearning, globalisation and capitalism arerelated within late modernity. It is criticalof the argument that there is now anincreasingly homogenous global economy that isknowledge based and that unambiguously requiresa high level of cognitive skills in itsworkers. The idea that globalisation producessuch rapid changes in the world of work thatlearning must be ongoing to cope with it ischallenged.
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  7.  8
    Empiricism in Vocational Education and Training.John Halliday - 1996 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 28 (1):40–56.
  8.  15
    Values and Further Education.John Halliday - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (1):66-81.
    This paper is a philosophically informed contribution to debate about the values that might inform and be communicated by a further education. It includes a historical review of the concern of colleges of further education with economic and personal development that was reflected in the distinction between vocational and liberal studies. This distinction is seen to arise out of a mistaken epistemology which attempts to distinguish once and for all as it were, objective facts from subjective values. As instrumentalism came (...)
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  9.  10
    Who Wants to Learn Forever.John Halliday - 2003 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3-4):195-210.
    This paper addresses the issue of how lifelonglearning, globalisation and capitalism arerelated within late modernity. It is criticalof the argument that there is now anincreasingly homogenous global economy that isknowledge based and that unambiguously requiresa high level of cognitive skills in itsworkers. The idea that globalisation producessuch rapid changes in the world of work thatlearning must be ongoing to cope with it ischallenged.It is argued that the key issue forpolicy-makers concerned to encourage lifelonglearning is funding the provision of thoselearning opportunities (...)
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  10.  24
    Competence in the Workplace: Rhetorical Robbery and Curriculum Policy.John Halliday - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (5):579–590.
  11.  29
    Distributive Justice and Vocational Education.John Halliday - 2004 - British Journal of Educational Studies 52 (2):151-165.
    This paper considers the relationship between distributive justice and vocational education. It examines both the way that the very notion of a vocational education carries implications for distributive justice and how the meaning of justice itself might be shifting towards one of inclusion. The argument, which is based on the recent work of Bernard Williams (2002), may have some general explanatory and predictive power particularly relevant to the educational uses of certain terms. 'Vocational' is used in the paper as an (...)
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  12.  7
    Educational Assessment.John Halliday - 2010 - In Richard Bailey (ed.), The Sage Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Sage Publication. pp. 369.
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  13.  1
    Post-Modernism and Post-Compulsory Education.John Halliday - 2001 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 14 (1):31-47.
    This paper examines and elaborates upon the work of two writers, Usher and Edwards who have explored the significance of post-modernism for those involved in the post-compulsory sector of education. They argue that postmodernism signals an increasing interest in this sector of education and a major challenge to the idea of compulsory schooling. In this paper it is argued that postmodernism challenges the very distinction between compulsory and postcompulsory education. It problematises and disturbs a number of entrenched assumptions about education, (...)
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  14.  14
    Values and Further Education.John Halliday - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (1):66-81.
    This paper is a philosophically informed contribution to debate about the values that might inform and be communicated by a further education. It includes a historical review of the concern of colleges of further education with economic and personal development that was reflected in the distinction between vocational and liberal studies. This distinction is seen to arise out of a mistaken epistemology which attempts to distinguish once and for all as it were, objective facts from subjective values. As instrumentalism came (...)
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