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John Henry [140]John W. Henry [3]John F. Henry [1]
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  1. Scientific Knowledge. A Sociological Analysis.Barry Barnes, David Bloor & John Henry - 1999 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (1):173-176.
     
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  2. Scientific Knowledge: A Sociological Approach.Barry Barnes, David Bloor & John Henry - 1996 - University of Chicago Press.
     
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  3. Occult qualities and the experimental philosophy: Active principles in pre-Newtonian matter theory.John Henry - 1986 - History of Science 24 (4):335-381.
  4.  32
    The Scientific Revolution and the Origins of Modern Science.John Henry - 1997 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Acknowledgements viii Acknowledgements for the Second Edition ix 1 The Scientific Revolution and the Historiography of Science 1 2 Renaissance and Revolution 9 3 The Scientific Method 14 The Mathematization of the World Picture 14 Experience and Experiment 30 4 Magic and the Origins of Modern Science 54 5 The Mechanical Philosophy 68 6 Religion and Science 85 7 Science and the Wider Culture 98 8 Conclusion 110 Bibliography 113 Glossary 139 Index 153.
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  5.  78
    Gravity and De gravitatione: the development of Newton’s ideas on action at a distance.John Henry - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):11-27.
    This paper is in three sections. The first establishes that Newton, in spite of a well-known passage in a letter to Richard Bentley of 1692, did believe in action at a distance. Many readers may see this merely as an act of supererogation, since it is so patently obvious that he did. However, there has been a long history among Newton scholars of allowing the letter to Bentley to over-ride all of Newton’s other pronouncements in favour of action at a (...)
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  6.  92
    Metaphysics and the Origins of Modern Science: Descartes and the Importance of Laws of Nature.John Henry - 2004 - Early Science and Medicine 9 (2):73-114.
    This paper draws attention to the crucial importance of a new kind of precisely defined law of nature in the Scientific Revolution. All explanations in the mechanical philosophy depend upon the interactions of moving material particles; the laws of nature stipulate precisely how these interact; therefore, such explanations rely on the laws of nature. While this is obvious, the radically innovatory nature of these laws is not fully acknowledged in the historical literature. Indeed, a number of scholars have tried to (...)
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  7. The fragmentation of Renaissance occultism and the decline of magic.John Henry - 2008 - History of Science 46 (1):1-48.
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  8.  97
    A cambridge platonist's materialism: Henry more and the concept of soul.John Henry - 1986 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 49 (1):172-195.
  9.  28
    Voluntarist Theology at the Origins of Modern Science: A Response to Peter Harrison.John Henry - 2009 - History of Science 47 (1):79-113.
  10.  23
    Newton, the sensorium of God, and the cause of gravity.John Henry - 2020 - Science in Context 33 (3):329-351.
    ArgumentIt is argued that the sensorium of God was introduced into theQuaestionesadded to the end of Newton’sOptice(1706) as a way of answering objections that Newton had failed to provide a causal account of gravity in thePrincipia. The discussion of God’s sensorium indicated that gravity must be caused by God’s will. Newton did not leave it there, however, but went on to show how God’s will created active principles as secondary causes of gravity. There was nothing unusual in assuming that God, (...)
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  11. Джон генри включение оккультных традиций в натурфилософию раннего нового времени: Новый подход к проблеме упадка магии.John Henry - 2013 - ГОСУДАРСТВО, РЕЛИГИЯ, ЦЕРКОВЬ В РОССИИ И ЗА РУБЕЖОМ 31 (1).
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  12.  46
    Animism and Empiricism: Copernican Physics and the Origins of William Gilbert's Experimental Method.John Henry - 2001 - Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (1):99-119.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Ideas 62.1 (2001) 99-119 [Access article in PDF] Animism and Empiricism: Copernican Physics and the Origins of William Gilbert's Experimental Method John Henry In the second year of this journal's run, way back in 1941, appeared Edgar Zilsel's classic and still widely cited paper on The Origins of William Gilbert's Experimental Method. 1 Focusing on Gilbert's De magnete of 1600, undoubtedly a seminal text (...)
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  13.  46
    A short history of scientific thought.John Henry - 2012 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    A highly readable historical survey of the major developments in scientific thought and the impact of science on Western culture, this book takes the reader from ancient times through to the twentieth century. Organized chronologically, the book explores the history of studies of the natural world, and man's role within that world, in a single volume"--Provided by publisher.
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  14.  44
    Primary and Secondary Causation in Samuel Clarke’s and Isaac Newton’s Theories of Gravity.John Henry - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):542-561.
    Samuel Clarke is best known to historians of science for presenting Isaac Newton’s views to a wider audience, especially in his famous correspondence with G. W. Leibniz. Clarke’s independent writings, however, reveal positions that do not derive from, and do not coincide with, Newton’s. This essay compares Clarke’s and Newton’s ideas on the cause of gravity, with a view to clarifying our understanding of Newton’s views. There is evidence to suggest that Newton believed God was directly responsible for gravity, and (...)
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  15.  24
    Atomism and Eschatology: Catholicism and Natural Philosophy in the Interregnum.John Henry - 1982 - British Journal for the History of Science 15 (3):211-239.
    In spite of vigorous opposition by a number of historians it has now become a commonplace that the rapid development of the ‘new philosophy’ sprang from the ideology of Puritanism. What began its career as the ‘Merton thesis’ has now been refined, developed, and so often repeated that it seems to be almost unassailable. However, the two foremost historians in the entrenchment of this new orthodoxy are willing, in principle, to concede that ‘in reality things were very mixed up’, and (...)
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  16.  10
    Ideology, Inevitability, and the Scientific Revolution.John Henry - 2008 - Isis 99 (3):552-559.
    ABSTRACT Looking in particular at the Scientific Revolution, this essay argues that, for all their differences, positivist commentators on science and contextualist historians of science ought to be committed to the view that counterfactual changes in the history of science would have made no significant difference to its historical development. Assumptions about the history of science as an inexorable march toward the truth commit the positivist to the view that, even if things had been different, scientific knowledge would still have (...)
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  17.  19
    Ideology, Inevitability, and the Scientific Revolution.John Henry - 2008 - Isis 99 (3):552-559.
    ABSTRACT Looking in particular at the Scientific Revolution, this essay argues that, for all their differences, positivist commentators on science and contextualist historians of science ought to be committed to the view that counterfactual changes in the history of science would have made no significant difference to its historical development. Assumptions about the history of science as an inexorable march toward the truth commit the positivist to the view that, even if things had been different, scientific knowledge would still have (...)
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  18.  58
    Francesco Patrizi da Cherso's concept of space and its later influence.John Henry - 1979 - Annals of Science 36 (6):549-573.
    This study considers the contribution of Francesco Patrizi da Cherso to the development of the concepts of void space and an infinite universe. Patrizi plays a greater role in the development of these concepts than any other single figure in the sixteenth century, and yet his work has been almost totally overlooked. I have outlined his views on space in terms of two major aspects of his philosophical attitude: on the one hand, he was a devoted Platonist and sought always (...)
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  19.  92
    Hobbes, Galileo, and the Physics of Simple Circular Motions.John Henry - 2016 - Hobbes Studies 29 (1):9-38.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 9 - 38 Hobbes tried to develop a strict version of the mechanical philosophy, in which all physical phenomena were explained only in terms of bodies in motion, and the only forces allowed were forces of collision or impact. This ambition puts Hobbes into a select group of original thinkers, alongside Galileo, Isaac Beeckman, and Descartes. No other early modern thinkers developed a strict version of the mechanical philosophy. Natural philosophies relying solely on (...)
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  20. Religion and the Scientific Revolution.John Henry - 2010 - In Peter Harrison (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Science and Religion. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  21.  11
    Isaac Newton y el problema de la acción a distancia.John Henry - 2007 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 35:189-226.
    La acción a distancia se ha considerado muy a menudo como un medio de explicación inaceptable en la física. Debido a que daba la impresión de resistirse a los intentos de asignarle causas propias a los efectos, la acción a distancia se ha proscrito como sinsentido ocultista. El rechazo de la acción a distancia fue el principal precepto del aristotelismo que fue tan dominante en la filosofía natural europea, y hasta hoy permanece como un prejuicio principal de la física moderna. (...)
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  22. New doctrines of body and its powers, place, and space.Daniel Garber, John Henry, Lynn Joy & Alan Gabbey - 1998 - In Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.), The Cambridge history of seventeenth-century philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 553-623.
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  23.  67
    Henry more.John Henry - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  24.  27
    The reception of cartesianism.John Henry - 2013 - In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford handbook of British philosophy in the seventeenth century. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. pp. 116.
    This chapter, which examines the work of Rene Descartes and the reception of Cartesianism in Great Britain in the seventeenth century, suggests that Descartes was an undeniably influential figure during this period, and explains that he exposed the faults of the philosophy before him and pointed the way forward. It also highlights the fact that Cartesianism was accepted in the universities after Aristotelianism was significantly affected by innovations in the sciences and university curricula in natural philosophy had to be changed.
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  25.  47
    Magic and science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.John Henry - 1989 - In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. pp. 583--596.
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  26.  6
    Knowledge is Power: How Magic, the Government and an Apocalyptic Vision Inspired Francis Bacon to Create Modern Science.John Henry - 2003 - Icon Books Company.
    John Henry gives a dramatic account of the background to Bacon's innovations and the sometimes unconventional sources for his ideas.
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  27.  79
    Newton and action at a distance between bodies—A response to Andrew Janiak's “Three concepts of causation in Newton”.John Henry - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 47 (C):91-97.
  28.  24
    ‘Mathematics Made No Contribution to the Public Weal’: Why Jean Fernel (1497-1558) Became a Physician.John Henry - 2011 - Centaurus 53 (3):193-220.
    This paper offers a caution that emphasis upon the importance of mathematics in recent historiography is in danger of obscuring the historical fact that, for the most part, mathematics was not seen as important in the pre-modern period. The paper proceeds by following a single case study, and in so doing offers the first account of the mathematical writings of Jean Fernel (1497–1558), better known as a leading medical innovator of the 16th century. After establishing Fernel's early commitment to mathematics, (...)
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  29. Moving Heaven and Earth. Copernicus and the Solar System.John Henry & Andrew Gregory - 2003 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 65 (4):768-769.
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  30.  15
    The Origins of Modern Science: Henry Oldenburg's Contribution.John Henry - 1988 - British Journal for the History of Science 21 (1):103-109.
  31.  20
    The General Resurrection and Early Modern Natural Philosophers: A Preliminary Survey.John Henry - 2023 - Zygon 58 (4):905-927.
    Noting that the doctrine of the general resurrection attracted renewed attention after the Reformation, and after the atomist revival led to the displacement of traditional hylomorphism by alternative matter theories, this article surveys the ways in which the resurrection was discussed by leading natural philosophers in seventeenth‐century England. These include discussion of how bodily resurrection might be possible, what resurrected bodies will be like; as well as the nature of living conditions after the resurrection. It is indicated that the resurrection (...)
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  32.  38
    Knowledge is Power: Francis Bacon and the Method of Science.John Henry - 2002 - Totem Books.
    A major figure in British political history, Francis Bacon is also one of the great names in the history of science.
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  33.  25
    Hobbes's Mechanical Philosophy and Its English Critics.John Henry - 2021 - In Marcus P. Adams (ed.), A Companion to Hobbes. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 381–397.
    This chapter focuses on the English response to Thomas Hobbes as a mechanical philosopher. Hobbes's mechanical philosophy was by no means merely derivative from Descartes's Principia philosophiae; indeed, Hobbes came closer than anyone else to developing a mechanistic system to match it. Hobbes's system was a carefully thought‐out and uniquely original system of mechanical philosophy, and none of his contemporaries, not even his staunchest critics, ever considered it to be simply derived from Cartesianism. An important aspect of the dispute between (...)
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  34.  11
    Henry More and Newton's gravity.John Henry - 1993 - History of Science 31 (1):83-97.
  35.  16
    Causation.Mariusz Tabaczek & John Henry - 2002 - In Gary B. Ferngren (ed.), Science and Religion: A Historical Introduction. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 377-394.
    In theology there has never been any doubt that God can cause things to happen, but there has been a great deal of controversy about the precise nature of God’s causal activity in nature. The theory of divine concurrentism (both God, as primary cause, and creatures, as secondary causes, are engaged in causal processes), fostering the middle way between the anti-providential notion of natural causation and occasionalism (which attributes all causation to God), was questioned in the era of modern science (...)
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  36.  15
    Newton's ‘De Aere et Aethere’ and the introduction of interparticulate forces into his physics.John Henry - 2023 - Annals of Science 80 (3):232-267.
    ABSTRACT As well as the mathematically-supported celestial mechanics that Newton developed in his Principia, Newton also proposed a more speculative natural philosophy of interparticulate forces of attraction and repulsion. Although this speculative philosophy was not made public before the ‘Queries’ which Newton appended to the Opticks, it originated far earlier in Newton’s career. This article makes the case that Newton’s short, unfinished manuscript, entitled ‘De Aere et Aethere’, should be seen as an important landmark in Newton’s intellectual development, being the (...)
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  37. David Leech: The Hammer of the Cartesians: Henry More’s Philosophy of Spirit and the Origins of Modern Atheism: Leuven, Peeters, 2013, xviii + 278 pages €€52.00.John Henry - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (3):267-271.
    Henry More (1614–1687), the most influential of the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and arguably the leading philosophically-inclined theologian in late seventeenth-century England, has come in for renewed attention lately. He was the subject of a detailed intellectual biography in 2003 by Robert Crocker, and in 2012 Jasper Reid published a philosophically penetrating and enlightening study of More’s metaphysics (Crocker 2003; Reid 2012). David Leech’s study of More’s idiosyncratic concept of immaterial spirit—and the role that it plays in his philosophy and theology—is (...)
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  38. Scientific Knowledge: A Sociological Approach and Steven Shapin, The Scientific Revolution.James Robert Brown, Barry Barnes, David Bloor & John Henry - 1998 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (1):100.
  39.  34
    Defending Copernicus and Galileo: Critical Reasoning in the Two Affairs.John Henry - 2010 - Intellectual History Review 20 (4):527-530.
  40.  37
    Essay Review: Henry More and Newton's Gravity, Henry More: Magic, Religion and ExperimentHenry More: Magic, Religion and Experiment. HallA. Rupert . Pp. xii + 304. £30.00.John Henry - 1993 - History of Science 31 (1):83-97.
  41.  10
    Isaac Newton: ciencia y religión en la unidad de su pensamiento.John Henry - 2008 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 38:69-102.
    Una de las principales razones para el éxito de la filosofía natural de Newton fue el papel que ésta tuvo al desarrollar una teología natural valiosa. Además, Newton mismo publicó las implicaciones teológicas de su propia filosofía natural. Aunque en la primera edición de los Principia no hay ninguna señal de Dios, para la segunda edición (1713) Newton introdujo un "Escolio General" en el que explícitamente discutía la relación entre Dios y su Creación. La obsesión de Newton por la interpretación (...)
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  42.  10
    Jed Z. Buchwald and Mordechai Feingold: Newton and the Origin of Civilization.John Henry - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (9):2357-2362.
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  43.  3
    Literature after Euclid: the geometric imagination in the long Scottish Enlightenment.John Henry - 2016 - Intellectual History Review 26 (4):564-566.
  44.  16
    Millenarianism and Messianism in English Literature and Thought, 1650-1800. Richard H. Popkin.John Henry - 1989 - Isis 80 (4):701-702.
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  45.  16
    More on More.John Henry - 2005 - Metascience 14 (2):225-228.
  46.  10
    Marx, Veblen, and the foundations of heterodox economics: essays in honor of John F. Henry.John F. Henry, Tae-Hee Jo & Frederic S. Lee (eds.) - 2016 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    John F. Henry is an eminent economist who has made important contributions to heterodox economics drawing on Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Thorstein Veblen, and John Maynard Keynes. His historical approach offers radical insights into the evolution of ideas (ideologies and theories) giving rise to and/or induced by the changes in capitalist society. Essays collected in this festschrift not only evaluate John Henry's contributions in connection to Marx's and Veblen's theories, but also apply them to the socio-economic issues in the 21st (...)
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  47.  9
    Newtonianism In 18th Century Britain.John Henry & Hutchinson - 2004 - Thoemmes.
  48.  13
    Nicolas Steno (1638–1686): A Polymath Reassessed.John Henry - 2020 - Isis 111 (2):365-367.
  49. National styles in science: A possible factor in the scientific revolution?John Henry - 2005 - In David N. Livingstone & Charles W. J. Withers (eds.), Geography and revolution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
     
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  50.  23
    Newton the alchemist: science, enigma, and the quest for nature’s ‘secret fire’: by William R. Newman, Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 2019, xx + 537 pp., 10 colour + 40 black & white plts, $39.95 (hardcover); £34.00, ISBN 978-0-691-17487-7.John Henry - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (4):549-552.
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