Results for 'John I. Aristotle'

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  1. An Introduction to Aristotle's Ethics, Books I-Iv Book X, Ch. Vi-Ix, in an Appendix.Edward Aristotle & Moore - 1871 - Rivingtons.
     
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  2. The Works of Aristotle.J. A. Aristotle, W. D. Smith, John I. Ross, G. R. T. Beare & Harold H. Ross - 1928 - Clarendon Press.
     
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  3. BEARE, JOHN I. - Greek Theories of Elementary Cognition From Alcmaeon to Aristotle[REVIEW]G. R. T. Ross - 1907 - Mind 16:118.
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  4.  3
    Notes on Some Arabic Manuscripts in the John Rylands Library. I. Averroes' Middle Commentary on Aristotle's "Analytica Priora Et Posteriora".Erwin I. J. Rosenthal - 1937 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 21 (2):479-483.
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  5. JUNE 2015 UPDATE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY: JOHN CORCORAN's PUBLICATIONS ON ARISTOTLE 1972–2015.John Corcoran - manuscript
    JUNE 2015 UPDATE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY: JOHN CORCORAN’S PUBLICATIONS ON ARISTOTLE 1972–2015 By John Corcoran -/- This presentation includes a complete bibliography of John Corcoran’s publications relevant to his research on Aristotle’s logic. Sections I, II, III, and IV list 21 articles, 44 abstracts, 3 books, and 11 reviews. It starts with two watershed articles published in 1972: the Philosophy & Phenomenological Research article from Corcoran’s Philadelphia period that antedates his Aristotle studies and the Journal (...)
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  6. A BIBLIOGRAPHY: JOHN CORCORAN's PUBLICATIONS ON ARISTOTLE 1972–2015.John Corcoran - manuscript
    This presentation includes a complete bibliography of John Corcoran’s publications devoted at least in part to Aristotle’s logic. Sections I–IV list 20 articles, 43 abstracts, 3 books, and 10 reviews. It starts with two watershed articles published in 1972: the Philosophy & Phenomenological Research article that antedates Corcoran’s Aristotle’s studies and the Journal of Symbolic Logic article first reporting his original results; it ends with works published in 2015. A few of the items are annotated with endnotes (...)
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  7.  27
    Three Anonymous Sets of Questions on Aristotle’s Physics Related to John Buridan’s Quaestiones Super Octo Libros Physicorum.Paul J. J. M. Bakker - 2016 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 58:233-323.
    This article offers a detailed presentation of three anonymous, unedited sets of questions on Aristotle’s Physics. The commentaries survive in manuscripts in Oxford, Munich and Sint Agatha. A comparison of the lists of quaestiones suggests that there is a close correspondence between the three commentaries, on the one hand, and the ultima lectura of John Buridan’s Quaestiones super octo libros Physicorum, on the other. Judging from the lists of quaestiones, it makes sense to attach the label secundum Buridanum (...)
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  8.  6
    Three Anonymous Sets of Questions on Aristotle’s Physics Related to John Buridan’s Quaestiones Super Octo Libros Physicorum.Paul J. J. M. Bakker - 2017 - Https://Doi.Org/10.1484/J.Bpm.5.113342 58:233-323.
    This article offers a detailed presentation of three anonymous, unedited sets of questions on Aristotle’s Physics. The commentaries survive in manuscripts in Oxford, Munich and Sint Agatha. A comparison of the lists of quaestiones suggests that there is a close correspondence between the three commentaries, on the one hand, and the ultima lectura of John Buridan’s Quaestiones super octo libros Physicorum, on the other. Judging from the lists of quaestiones, it makes sense to attach the label secundum Buridanum (...)
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  9.  9
    Duns Scotus on Time and Existence: The Questions on Aristotle’s “De Interpretatione.” by John Duns Scotus.Allan Bäck - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):162-163.
    This book offers a translation of two short commentaries by John Duns Scotus on Aristotle’s On Interpretation. It comes with an introduction, notes, and a commentary. I think that this book would be difficult for a novice; perhaps the intended audience is someone with a general familiarity with medieval philosophy, although not necessarily with medieval logic. I do not think that someone just interested in general logical issues, such as existential import or future contingents, will find much to (...)
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  10.  13
    Aristotle's Physics Book I: A Systematic Exploration Ed. By Diana Quarantotto.John Bowin - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (1):161-162.
    This volume is the product of a pair of conferences on book I of Aristotle’s Physics at Sapienza University of Rome in 2013 and 2015. Each chapter of book I receives a philosophical commentary by a prominent specialist in ancient philosophy. The contributions offer systematic and thorough exegesis, as well as new and interesting solutions to interpretative problems. In what follows, I will focus chiefly on the latter.Diana Quarantotto begins the volume with a discussion of the overall structure, role, (...)
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  11.  18
    AmΦIΣbhthΣiΣ TiΣ (Aristotle, E.N. 1096b7–26).John C. Hall - 1966 - Classical Quarterly 16 (01):55-.
    E.N. 1. 6 may be divided into three approximately equal paragraphs. The first of these contains four arguments against Academic positions associated with the phrase ‘Idea of the Good’. All these arguments also occur, together with others, in the Eudemian Ethics. The second paragraph consists of the consideration and rejection of an objection to the whole or a part of A, and is new to E.N. The third , also new to E.N., consists of the putting forward and dismissal of (...)
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  12. Aristotle and the Virtues of Will Power.Noell Birondo - 2015 - Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (2):85-94.
    Since the 1970s, at least, and presumably under the influence of the later Wittgenstein, certain advocates of Aristotle’s ethics have insisted that a proper validation of the virtues of character must proceed only from within, or be internal to, the particular evaluative outlook provided by possession of the virtues themselves. The most influential advocate of this line of thinking is arguably John McDowell, although Rosalind Hursthouse and Daniel C. Russell have also more recently embraced it. Here I consider (...)
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  13.  43
    Aristotle: Politics: Books I & II. [REVIEW]John Cleary - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):199-199.
  14.  22
    "The Greek Commentaries on the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle: In the Latin Translation of Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln , Volume 1: Eustratius on Book I and the Anonymous Scholia on Books II, III, and IV," Critical Edition with an Introductory Study by H. Paul F. Mercken. [REVIEW]John L. Treloar - 1976 - Modern Schoolman 53 (2):187-189.
  15.  28
    The Vicissitudes of Common-Sense Virtue Ethics, Part I: From Aristotle to Slote. [REVIEW]John Kultgen - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (3):325-341.
  16. The Good Life and the Good Economy: The Humanist Perspective of Aristotle, the Pragmatists and Vitalists, and the Economic Justice of John Rawls.Edmund S. Phelps - 2008 - In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. Oxford University Press.
     
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  17.  23
    The Principle of Finality in the Philosophy of Aristotle and Teilhard de Chardin, I.John L. Russell & J. S. - 1962 - Heythrop Journal 3 (4):347–357.
  18.  23
    Aristotle's Posterior Analytics: I. Demonstration.John Watson - 1904 - Philosophical Review 13 (1):1-15.
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  19.  5
    Providence in John Philoponus’ Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics.Giovanna R. Giardina - 2015 - Chôra 13:149-172.
    Commentando Aristotele, Phys. II 4, 6 e 8, Filopono assume costantemente Empedocle come modello di tutta una tradizione filosofica che individua nella materia e nel caso i principi sia dell’universo sia degli enti particolari. Filopono e d’accordo con Aristotele nel ritenere assurda la posizione dei materialisti, che considerano il caso non soltanto come causa degli enti che divengono sempre o per lo piu allo stesso modo, tra i quali talvolta si verificano casi di enti che si generano contro natura, ma (...)
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  20.  15
    The Metaphysic of Aristotle. I.John Watson - 1898 - Philosophical Review 7 (1):23-42.
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  21.  2
    The Principle of Finality in the Philosophy of Aristotle and Teilhard de Chardin, I.John L. Russell - 1962 - Heythrop Journal 3 (4):347-357.
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  22. The Metaphysic of Aristotle. I.John Watson - 1898 - Philosophical Review 7:113.
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  23. The Metaphysic of Aristotle. I.John Watson - 1898 - Philosophical Review 7:23.
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  24. The Metaphysic of Aristotle. I.John Watson - 1898 - Philosophical Review 7:248.
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  25.  12
    John Philoponus' Criticism of Aristotle's Theory of Aether. [REVIEW]Seymour Feldman & C. Wildberg - 1990 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 110 (4):243-244.
  26. The Influence of Plato and Aristotle on John Dewey's Philosophy.J. J. Chambliss - 1990
     
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  27. Moral Character Versus Situations: An Aristotelian Contribution to the Debate.Anna Marmodoro - 2011 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 5 (2).
    In everyday life we assume substantial behavioural reliability in others, and on the basis of it we talk of people as acting “in character” and “out of character”. This common assumption seems intuitively well founded. But recent experiments in social psychology have generated philosophical controversy around it. In the context of this debate, John Doris challenges Aristotle’s well known and influential view that people’s behavioural reliability with respect to acting virtuously is underpinned by character traits, understood as settled (...)
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  28.  57
    Aristotle’s “Whenever Three Terms”.John Corcoran - 2013 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 19 (3):234-235.
    The premise-fact confusion in Aristotle’s PRIOR ANALYTICS. -/- The premise-fact fallacy is talking about premises when the facts are what matters or talking about facts when the premises are what matters. It is not useful to put too fine a point on this pencil. -/- In one form it is thinking that the truth-values of premises are relevant to what their consequences in fact are, or relevant to determining what their consequences are. Thus, e.g., someone commits the premise-fact fallacy (...)
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  29.  21
    Retour sur l'affaire Gouguenheim.Max Lejbowicz - 2013 - Methodos 13.
    Une invitation, reçue au début de l’automne 2011, à intervenir dans la séance du 7 mars 2012 d’un séminaire tenu à l’EHESS sur l’islamophobie, a été l’occasion de traiter de « l’affaire Gouguenheim » plus de trois ans après son irruption dans la sphère médiatique. Cette nouvelle lecture d’Aristote au Mont Saint-Michel a permis de mettre en évidence l’importance que Sylvain Gouguenheim attribue à un texte du haut Moyen Age pour suivre la diffusion de l’hellénisme dans l’Europe latine. Il s’agit (...)
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  30.  42
    Aristotle’s Theory of Language in the Light of Phys. I.1.Pavol Labuda - 2018 - Aither. Journal for the Study of Greek and Latin Philosophical Traditions 10 (20/2018 - International Issue 5):66-77.
    The main aim of my paper is to analyse Aristotle’s theory of language in the context of his Physics I.1 and via an analysis and an interpretation of this part of his Physics I try to show that (i) the study of human language (logos) significantly falls within the competence of Aristotle’s physics (i.e. natural philosophy), (ii) we can find the results of such (physical) inquiry in Aristotle’s zoological writings, stated in the forms of the first principles, (...)
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  31. Why the View of Intellect in De Anima I 4 Isn’T Aristotle’s Own.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):241-254.
    In De Anima I 4, Aristotle describes the intellect (nous) as a sort of substance, separate and incorruptible. Myles Burnyeat and Lloyd Gerson take this as proof that, for Aristotle, the intellect is a separate eternal entity, not a power belonging to individual humans. Against this reading, I show that this passage does not express Aristotle’s own views, but dialectically examines a reputable position (endoxon) about the intellect that seems to show that it can be subject to (...)
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  32.  36
    The Subjects of Natural Generations in Aristotle’s Physics I.7.Scott O'Connor - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (1):45-75.
    In 'Physics' I.7, Aristotle claims that plants and animals are generated from sperma. Since most understood sperma to be an ovum, this claim threatens to undermine the standard view that, for Aristotle, the matter natural beings are generated from persists through their generation. By focusing on Aristotle’s discussion of sperma in the first book of the 'Generation of Animals', I show that, for Aristotle, sperma in the female is surplus blood collected in the uterus and not (...)
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  33.  14
    The Eleatic Challenge in Aristotle’s Physics I.8.Scott O’Connor - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (1):25-50.
    In Physics I.8, Aristotle outlines and responds to an Eleatic argument against the reality of change. I defend a new reading according to which the argu- ment assumes Predicational Monism, the claim that each being can possess only one property. In Phys. I.2, Aristotle responds to Predicational Monism, which he attributes to the Eleatics; I argue that he uses this response to distinguish coin- cidental from non-coincidental becoming, a distinction he employs in Phys I.8 to resolve the argument (...)
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  34.  50
    Direct Realism with and Without Representation: John Buridan and Durand of St.-Pourçain on Species.Peter Hartman - 2017 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Questions on the soul by John Buridan and others. Berlin, Germany: Springer. pp. 107-129.
    As we now know, most, if not all, philosophers in the High Middle Ages agreed that what we immediately perceive are external objects and that the immediate object of perception must not be some image present to the mind. Yet most — but not all — philosophers in the High Middle Ages also held, following Aristotle, that perception is a process wherein the percipient takes on the likeness of the external object. This likeness — called a species — is (...)
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  35. SEPTEMBER 2015 UPDATE CORCORAN ARISTOTLE BIBLIOGRAPHY.John Corcoran - forthcoming - Aporia 5.
    This presentation includes a complete bibliography of John Corcoran’s publications relevant on Aristotle’s logic. The Sections I, II, III, and IV list respectively 23 articles, 44 abstracts, 3 books, and 11 reviews. Section I starts with two watershed articles published in 1972: the Philosophy & Phenomenological Research article—from Corcoran’s Philadelphia period that antedates his discovery of Aristotle’s natural deduction system—and the Journal of Symbolic Logic article—from his Buffalo period first reporting his original results. It ends with works (...)
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  36. Aristotle on Illusory Perception: Phantasia Without Phantasmata.Noell Birondo - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):57-71.
    In De Anima III.3 Aristotle presents his official discussion of phantasia (“imagination” in most translations). At the very outset of the discussion Aristotle offers as an endoxon that “phantasia is that in virtue of which we say that a phantasma occurs to us” (428a1-2). Now a natural reading of this claim, taken up by many commentators, can pose a problem for Aristotle’s overall account of perception. Here I argue that, although it would be silly to deny that (...)
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  37. Aristotle’s Semiotic Triangles and Pyramids.John Corcoran - 2015 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 21 (1):198-9.
    Imagine an equilateral triangle “pointing upward”—its horizontal base under its apex angle. A semiotic triangle has the following three “vertexes”: (apex) an expression, (lower-left) one of the expression’s conceptual meanings or senses, and (lower-right) the referent or denotation determined by the sense [1, pp. 88ff]. One example: the eight-letter string ‘coleslaw’ (apex), the concept “coleslaw” (lower-left), and the salad coleslaw (lower-right) [1, p. 84f]. Using Church’s terminology [2, pp. 6, 41]—modifying Frege’s—the word ‘coleslaw’ expresses the concept “coleslaw”, the word ‘coleslaw’ (...)
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  38.  16
    Studies on Plato, Aristotle and Proclus: The Collected Essays on Ancient Philosophy of John Cleary.John J. Cleary - 2013 - Brill.
    John J. Cleary was an internationally recognised authority in ancient Greek philosophy. This volume of penetrating studies of Plato, Aristotle, and Proclus, philosophy of mathematics, and ancient theories of education, display Cleary’s range of expertise and originality of approach.
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  39. Studies on Plato, Aristotle and Proclus: The Collected Essays on Ancient Philosophy of John Cleary.John M. Dillon, Brendan O'Byrne & Fran O'Rourke (eds.) - 2013 - Brill.
    John J. Cleary was an internationally recognised authority in ancient Greek philosophy. This volume of penetrating studies of Plato, Aristotle, and Proclus, philosophy of mathematics, and ancient theories of education, display Cleary’s range of expertise and originality of approach.
     
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  40.  41
    Teaching Ethics, Happiness, and The Good Life: An Upbuilding Discourse in the Spirits of Soren Kierkegaard and John Dewey.Alexander Stehn - 2018 - In Steven M. Cahn, Alexandra Bradner & Andrew Mills (eds.), Philosophers in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching. Indianapolis, IN, USA: pp. 170-184.
    This essay narrates what I have learned from Søren Kierkegaard & John Dewey about teaching philosophy. It consists of three sections: 1) a Deweyan pragmatist’s translation of Kierkegaard’s religious insights on Christianity, as a way of life, into ethical insights on philosophy, as a way of life; 2) a brief description of the introductory course that I teach most frequently: Ethics, Happiness, & The Good Life; and 3) an exploration of three spiritual exercises from the course: a) self-cultivation by (...)
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  41.  12
    Four Studies in St John, I: The Man Born Blind.John Bligh & J. S. - 1966 - Heythrop Journal 7 (2):129–144.
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  42.  3
    Colloquium 5 Aristotle on What to Praise and What to Prize: An Interpretation of Nicomachean Ethics I.12.Jan Szaif - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):149-178.
    This essay offers an analysis and interpretation of the rarely commented-on chapter I.12 of the Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle’s goal in this chapter is to prove that human happiness belongs to the class of prized goods, also characterized as divine goods, whereas virtue ranks lower, being a merely praiseworthy good. It is not easy to see why this chapter is placed at the end of Aristotle’s general discussion of the highest human good in Book I or why he included (...)
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  43. Aristotle's Philia and Moral Development.Andreas Vakirtzis - 2013 - Philosophical Inquiry 37 (1-2):49-65.
    Several scholars argue that Aristotle's character friendship occurs only between completely virtuous moral agents. Oppositely, others seem to be more skeptical about such an interpretation. Especially John Cooper (1980) has given to us an original and creative understanding of the matter at hand. Particularly, he argues that not only the completely virtuous agents can engage in virtuous friendship; less morally developed agents can do so as well. The key advantage of Cooper’s account is that it allows agents of (...)
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  44.  44
    Aristotle, Egoism and the Virtuous Person’s Point of View’.Stephen Gardiner - 2001 - In D. Blyth D. Baltzly (ed.), Power and Pleasure, Virtues and Vices: Essays in Ancient Moral Philosophy. pp. 239-262.
    According to the traditional interpretation, Aristotle’s ethics, and ancient virtue ethics more generally, is fundamentally grounded in self-interest, and so in some sense egoistic. Most contemporary ethical theorists regard egoism as morally repellent, and so dismiss Aristotle’s approach. But recent traditional interpreters have argued that Aristotle’s egoism is not vulnerable to this criticism. Indeed, they claim that Aristotle’s egoism actually accommodates morality. For, they say, Aristotle’s view is that an agent’s best interests are partially constituted (...)
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  45.  70
    Physics and Astronomy: Aristotle's Physics II.2.193b22–194a12this Paper Was Prepared as the Basis of a Presentation at a Conference Entitled “Writing and Rewriting the History of Science, 1900–2000,” Les treilLes, France, September, 2003, Organized by Karine Chemla and Roshdi Rashed. I Have Compared Aristotle's and Ptolemy's Views of the Relationship Between Astronomy and Physics in a Paper Called “Astrologogeômetria and Astrophysikê in Aristotle and Ptolemy,” Presented at a Conference Entitled “Physics and Mathematics in Antiquity,” Leiden, the Netherlands, June, 2004, Organized by Keimpe Algra and Frans de Haas. For a Discussion of Hellenistic Views of This Relationship See Ian Mueller, “Remarks on Physics and Mathematical Astronomy and Optics in Epicurus, Sextus Empiricus, and Some Stoics,” in Philippa Lang , Re-Inventions: Essays on Hellenistic and Early Roman Science, Apeiron 37, 4 : 57–87. I Would Like to Thank Two Anonymous Readers of This Essay for Meticulous Corrections and Th. [REVIEW]Ian Mueller - 2006 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 16 (2):175-206.
    In the first part of chapter 2 of book II of the Physics Aristotle addresses the issue of the difference between mathematics and physics. In the course of his discussion he says some things about astronomy and the ‘ ‘ more physical branches of mathematics”. In this paper I discuss historical issues concerning the text, translation, and interpretation of the passage, focusing on two cruxes, the first reference to astronomy at 193b25–26 and the reference to the more physical branches at 194a7–8. (...)
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  46. Aristotle Physics I 8.Sean Kelsey - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (4):330 - 361.
    Aristotle's thesis in "Physics" I 8 is that a certain old and familiar problem about coming to be can only be solved with the help of the new account of the "principles" he has developed in "Physics" I 7. This is a strong thesis and the literature on the chapter does not quite do it justice; specifically, as things now stand we are left wondering why Aristotle should have found this problem so compelling in the first place. In (...)
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  47.  4
    Aristotle: Politics, Books I and II.Charles M. Young & Trevor J. Saunders - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):87.
    The volumes in the Clarendon Aristotle Series seek to meet the needs of philosophically inclined readers who do not know Greek by providing accurate translations of selected Aristotelian texts accompanied by philosophical commentaries. To these ends, Trevor Saunders’s welcome addition to the series, a treatment of the first two books of Aristotle’s Politics, provides a number of useful tools. First there is a new translation of books I and II. Saunders numbers the paragraphs of the translation and the (...)
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  48. I Am John's Brain.Andy Clark - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (2):144-8.
    I am John's[3] brain. In the flesh, I am just a rather undistinguished looking grey/white mass of cells. My surface is heavily convoluted and I am possessed of a fairly differentiated internal structure. John and I are on rather close and intimate terms; indeed, sometimes it is hard to tell us apart. But at times, John takes this intimacy a little too far. When that happens, he gets very confused about my role and functioning. He imagines that (...)
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  49.  12
    Aristotle’s 'Physics' Book I: A Systematic Exploration, Ed. Diana Quarantotto. [REVIEW]Jason W. Carter - 2018 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 10.
    Originating from two conferences that took place in September 2013 and June 2015 at Sapienza University of Rome, this outstanding specialist volume aims to systematically illuminate the arguments that Aristotle uses in trying to establish the ‘first principles’ of his natural philosophy in Physics I. Not only is it successful in achieving this overall goal, but it is also timely, as its publication anticipates the forthcoming proceedings of the July 2014 Symposium Aristotelicum, devoted to the Physics.
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  50. Aristotle on Logical Consequence.Phil Corkum - manuscript
    Compare two conceptions of validity: under an example of a modal conception, an argument is valid just in case it is impossible for the premises to be true and the conclusion false; under an example of a topic-neutral conception, an argument is valid just in case there are no arguments of the same logical form with true premises and a false conclusion. This taxonomy of positions suggests a project in the philosophy of logic: the reductive analysis of the modal conception (...)
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