Results for 'John K. Forrest'

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  1. Reality or Preachment.John K. Forrest - 1967 - Boston: Beacon Press.
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  2. Aiming to Kill: The Ethics of Suicide and Euthanasia. By Nigel Biggar, Religion and the Death Penalty: A Call for Reckoning. Edited by Erik C. Owens, John D. Carlson, and Eric P. Elshtain and Theological Fragments: Explorations in Unsystematic Theology. By Duncan B. Forrester. [REVIEW]John K. Burk - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (3):489–491.
  3.  83
    Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis.Gerhard Preyer, Frank Siebelt, D. M. Armstrong, Jonathan Bennett, John Bigelow, Daniel Bonevac, Phillip Bricker, Peter Forrest, Terence Horgan, Harold W. Noonan, Paul Teller & Michael Tye (eds.) - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Reality and Humean Supervenience confronts the reader with central aspects in the philosophy of David Lewis, whose work in ontology, metaphysics, logic, probability, philosophy of mind, and language articulates a unique and systematic foundation for modern physicalism.
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  4.  20
    Linear Arithmetic Desecsed.John K. Slaney, Robert K. Meyer & Greg Restall - 1996 - Logique Et Analyse 39:379-388.
  5. The Correspondence of Alfred Marshall, Economist.John K. Whitaker (ed.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is the third of a three-volume work constituting a comprehensive, scholarly edition of the correspondence of the English economist, Alfred Marshall, one of the leading figures in the development of economics and the founder of the Cambridge School of Economics. The edition fills a long-standing gap in the history of economic thought with hitherto unpublished material. Students will find it a basic resource for understanding the development of economics and other social sciences in the period since 1870. In particular, (...)
     
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  6.  92
    Analyzing Vision at the Complexity Level.John K. Tsotsos - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):423-445.
    The general problem of visual search can be shown to be computationally intractable in a formal, complexity-theoretic sense, yet visual search is extensively involved in everyday perception, and biological systems manage to perform it remarkably well. Complexity level analysis may resolve this contradiction. Visual search can be reshaped into tractability through approximations and by optimizing the resources devoted to visual processing. Architectural constraints can be derived using the minimum cost principle to rule out a large class of potential solutions. The (...)
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  7.  22
    ALCOVE: An Exemplar-Based Connectionist Model of Category Learning.John K. Kruschke - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (1):22-44.
  8.  47
    William James, John Dewey, and the ‘Death-of-God’: JOHN K. ROTH.John K. Roth - 1971 - Religious Studies 7 (1):53-61.
    Basic issues in the recent ‘death-of-God’ movement can be illuminated by comparison and contrast with the relevant ideas of two American philosophers, John Dewey and William James. Dewey is an earlier spokesman for ideas that are central to the ‘radical theology’ of Thomas J. J. Altizer, William Hamilton, and Paul Van Buren. His reasons for rejecting theism closely resemble propositions maintained by these ‘death-of-God’ theologians. James, on the other hand, points toward a theological alternative. He takes cognizance of ideas (...)
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  9. Faultless Disagreement, Cognitive Command, and Epistemic Peers.John K. Davis - 2015 - Synthese 192 (1):1-24.
    Relativism and contextualism are the most popular accounts of faultless disagreement, but Crispin Wright once argued for an account I call divergentism. According to divergentism, parties who possess all relevant information and use the same standards of assessment in the same context of utterance can disagree about the same proposition without either party being in epistemic fault, yet only one of them is right. This view is an alternative to relativism, indexical contextualism, and nonindexical contextualism, and has advantages over those (...)
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  10.  5
    A Complexity Level Analysis of Vision.John K. Tsotsos - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):423-445.
    The general problem of visual search can be shown to be computationally intractable in a formal, complexity-theoretic sense, yet visual search is extensively involved in everyday perception, and biological systems manage to perform it remarkably well. Complexity level analysis may resolve this contradiction. Visual search can be reshaped into tractability through approximations and by optimizing the resources devoted to visual processing. Architectural constraints can be derived using the minimum cost principle to rule out a large class of potential solutions. The (...)
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  11.  21
    Bayesian Estimation Supersedes the T Test.John K. Kruschke - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (2):573-603.
  12. What to Believe: Bayesian Methods for Data Analysis.John K. Kruschke - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (7):293-300.
  13.  33
    Isolation of the Muscular Component in a Proprioceptive Spatial Aftereffect.John K. Collins - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (2):297.
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  14.  86
    Precedent Autonomy and Subsequent Consent.John K. Davis - 2004 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (3):267-291.
    Honoring a living will typically involves treating an incompetent patient in accord with preferences she once had, but whose objects she can no longer understand. How do we respect her precedent autonomy by giving her what she used to want? There is a similar problem with subsequent consent: How can we justify interfering with someone''s autonomy on the grounds that she will later consent to the interference, if she refuses now?Both problems arise on the assumption that, to respect someone''s autonomy, (...)
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  15.  35
    A Metacompleteness Theorem for Contraction-Free Relevant Logics.John K. Slaney - 1984 - Studia Logica 43 (1-2):159 - 168.
    I note that the logics of the relevant group most closely tied to the research programme in paraconsistency are those without the contraction postulate(A.AB).AB and its close relatives. As a move towards gaining control of the contraction-free systems I show that they are prime (that wheneverA B is a theorem so is eitherA orB). The proof is an extension of the metavaluational techniques standardly used for analogous results about intuitionist logic or the relevant positive logics.
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  16.  65
    Easy to Remember?: Genocide and the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW]John K. Roth - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1-3):31-42.
    Philosophers of religion have written a great deal about the problem of evil. Their reflections, however, have not concentrated, at least not extensively or sufficiently, on the particularities of evil that manifest themselves in genocide. Concentrating on some of those particularities, this essay reflects on genocide, which has sometimes been called the crime of crimes, to raise questions such as: how should genocide affect the philosophy of religion and what might philosophers of religion contribute to help check that crime against (...)
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  17.  8
    Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide.John K. Roth (ed.) - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Genocide is evil or nothing could be. It raises a host of questions about humanity, rights, justice, and reality, which are key areas of concern for philosophy. Strangely, however, philosophers have tended to ignore genocide. Even more problematic, philosophy and philosophers bear more responsibility for genocide than they have usually admitted. In Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide, an international group of twenty-five contemporary philosophers work to correct those deficiencies by showing how philosophy can and should repsond to genocide, (...)
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  18.  10
    John Norris: A Seventeenth Century English Thomist.John K. Ryan - 1940 - New Scholasticism 14 (2):109-145.
  19. Intuition and the Junctures of Judgment in Decision Procedures for Clinical Ethics.John K. Davis - 2007 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (1):1-30.
    Moral decision procedures such as principlism or casuistry require intuition at certain junctures, as when a principle seems indeterminate, or principles conflict, or we wonder which paradigm case is most relevantly similar to the instant case. However, intuitions are widely thought to lack epistemic justification, and many ethicists urge that such decision procedures dispense with intuition in favor of forms of reasoning that provide discursive justification. I argue that discursive justification does not eliminate or minimize the need for intuition, or (...)
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  20.  24
    The Concept of Precedent Autonomy.John K. Davies - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (2):114–133.
  21.  53
    How to Justify Enforcing a Ulysses Contract When Ulysses is Competent to Refuse.John K. Davis - 2008 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (1):pp. 87-106.
    Sometimes the mentally ill have sufficient mental capacity to refuse treatment competently, and others have a moral duty to respect their refusal. However, those with episodic mental disorders may wish to precommit themselves to treatment, using Ulysses contracts known as “mental health advance directives.” How can health care providers justify enforcing such contracts over an agent’s current, competent refusal? I argue that providers respect an agent’s autonomy not retrospectively—by reference to his or her past wishes—and not merely synchronically—so that the (...)
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  22.  16
    Reduced Models for Relevant Logics Without ${\Rm WI}$.John K. Slaney - 1987 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 28 (3):395-407.
  23.  7
    Locally Bayesian Learning with Applications to Retrospective Revaluation and Highlighting.John K. Kruschke - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (4):677-699.
  24.  38
    Pragmatic Decision Making: A Manager’s Epistemic Defence.John K. Alexander - 2003 - Philosophy of Management 3 (3):67-77.
    I was in manufacturing for over thirty years and a manager for nearly twenty-five. During that time it never occurred to me that the consequentialist, utilitarian framework I used was inadequate as a conceptual framework for making decisions to ensure organisational viability and success. The framework gave three criteria which enabled me to construct a rational approach to issues associated with my role as a manager: to make product at the lowest possible cost so as to maximise the bottom line; (...)
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  25.  68
    Conscientious Refusal and a Doctors's Right to Quit.John K. Davis - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):75 – 91.
    Patients sometimes request procedures their doctors find morally objectionable. Do doctors have a right of conscientious refusal? I argue that conscientious refusal is justified only if the doctor's refusal does not make the patient worse off than she would have been had she gone to another doctor in the first place. From this approach I derive conclusions about the duty to refer and facilitate transfer, whether doctors may provide 'moral counseling,' whether doctors are obligated to provide objectionable procedures when no (...)
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  26.  79
    Subjectivity, Judgment, and the Basing Relationship.John K. Davis - 2009 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):21-40.
    Moral and legal judgments sometimes depend on personal traits in this sense: the subject offers good reasons for her judgment, but if she had a different social or ideological background, her judgment would be different. If you would judge the constitutionality of restrictions on abortion differently if you were not a secular liberal, is your judgment really based on the arguments you find convincing, or do you find them so only because you are a secular liberal? I argue that a (...)
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  27. Models of Categorization.John K. Kruschke - 2008 - In Ron Sun (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Computational Psychology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 267--301.
     
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  28. An Alternative to Relativism.John K. Davis - 2010 - Philosophical Topics 38 (2):17-37.
    Some moral disagreements are so persistent that we suspect they are deep : we would disagree even when we have all relevant information and no one makes any mistakes. The possibility of deep disagreement is thought to drive cognitivists toward relativism, but most cognitivists reject relativism. There is an alternative. According to divergentism, cognitivists can reject relativism while allowing for deep disagreement. This view has rarely been defended at length, but many philosophers have implicitly endorsed its elements. I will defend (...)
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  29.  14
    Charles Peirce's Guess at the Riddle: Grounds for Human Significance.John K. Sheriff - 1994 - Indiana University Press.
    "Sheriff’s text moves the "guess" to a new level of understanding, while integrating much of Peirce’s philosophy, and provokes many questions." —Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy Newletter "The purpose of Sheriff’s work is to expound Peirce’s unified theory of the universe—from cosmology to semiotic—and to discuss its ramifications for how we should live. He concludes that Peirce has given us a theory we can live with. The book makes an important contribution to philosophy of life and to the (...)
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  30.  58
    A Brief and Selective History of Attention.John K. Tsotsos, Laurent Itti & Geraint Rees - 2005 - In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press.
  31.  14
    Effects of Stimulus Concreteness-Imagery and Arousal on Immediate and Delayed Recall.John C. Schmitt & William E. Forrester - 1973 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 2 (1):25-26.
  32. Life-Extension and the Malthusian Objection.John K. Davis - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):27 – 44.
    The worst possible way to resolve this issue is to leave it up to individual choice. There is no known social good coming from the conquest of death (Bailey, 1999). - Daniel Callahan Dramatically extending the human lifespan seems increasingly possible. Many bioethicists object that life-extension will have Malthusian consequences as new Methuselahs accumulate, generation by generation. I argue for a Life-Years Response to the Malthusian Objection. If even a minority of each generation chooses life-extension, denying it to them deprives (...)
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  33.  61
    Euthanasia and Quality of Life.John K. DiBaise - 2017 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 17 (3):417-424.
    Euthanasia advocates argue that end-of-life decisions should be based on patients’ autonomous evaluations of their own quality of life. The question is whether a patient’s quality of life has deteriorated so far as to make death a benefit. Criteria for evaluating quality of life are, however, unavoidably arbitrary and unjust. The concept is difficult to define, and human autonomy has limits. This essay discusses the moral issues raised by quality-of-life judgments at the end of life: who makes them, what criteria (...)
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  34.  58
    A Multicultural Examination of Business Ethics Perceptions.Dean E. Allmon, Henry C. K. Chen, Thomas K. Pritchett & Pj Forrest - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (2):183-188.
    This study provides an evaluation of ethical business perception of busIness students from three countries: Australia, Taiwan and the United States. Although statistically significant differences do exist there is significant agreement with the way students perceive ethical/unethical practices in business. The findings of this paper indicate a universality of business ethical perceptions.
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  35.  33
    Promising, Professional Obligations, and the Refusal to Provide Service.John K. Alexander - 2005 - HEC Forum 17 (3):178-195.
  36.  9
    Schemas: Not yet an Interlingua for the Brain Sciences.John K. Tsotsos - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (3):447-448.
  37.  12
    The Perception of Causality: Feature Binding in Interacting Objects.John K. Kruschke & Michael M. Fragassi - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 441--446.
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  38.  14
    Complexity Level Analysis Revisited: What Can 30 Years of Hindsight Tell Us About How the Brain Might Represent Visual Information?John K. Tsotsos - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  39.  14
    John M. Forrester . The “De Subtilitate” of Girolamo Cardano. With an Introduction by John Henry and John M. Forrester. 2 Volumes. Xxxvii + 1,058 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. Tempe, Ariz.: ACMRS, 2013. [REVIEW]Silvia Manzo - 2017 - Isis 108 (4):891-892.
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  40.  14
    A Structurally Complete Fragment of Relevant Logic.John K. Slaney & Robert K. Meyer - 1992 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 33 (4):561-566.
  41.  26
    3088 Varieties a Solution to the Ackermann Constant Problem.John K. Slaney - 1985 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 50 (2):487-501.
    It is shown that there are exactly six normal DeMorgan monoids generated by the identity element alone. The free DeMorgan monoid with no generators but the identity is characterised and shown to have exactly three thousand and eighty-eight elements. This result solves the "Ackerman constant problem" of describing the structure of sentential constants in the logic R.
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  42.  4
    Cognitive Programs: Software for Attention's Executive.John K. Tsotsos & Wouter Kruijne - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  43.  10
    Fathers and Sons in Athens. Ideology and Society in the Era of the Peloponnesian War. [REVIEW]John K. Davies & B. R. Strauss - 1999 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:210-211.
  44.  40
    Two Practical Exercises for Teaching Business and Professional Ethics.John K. Alexander - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (1):1-20.
    The paper describes two practical exercises requiring students to consider certain concrete decisions made by managers in business and professional life. The first exercise requires students to consider that competitive economic exchange inevitably puts managers in situations where they cannot accurately predict the outcomes of their decisions, and often results in harm to innocent people. In this practical exercise, seven discussion situations are described and students are asked to make decisions that take into account the individuals affected by these managerial (...)
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  45.  21
    A Little Complexity Analysis Goes a Long Way.John K. Tsotsos - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):458-469.
  46.  5
    Rules and Exemplars in Category Learning.Michael A. Erickson & John K. Kruschke - 1998 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 127 (2):107-140.
  47.  19
    I. K. R Aubitschek : Isthmia: Excavations by the University of Chicago Under the Auspices of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens: Vol. VII. The Metal Objects (1952–1989) . Pp. Xxxv + 200, 8plans, 96 Pls. Princeton: The American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1998. Cased, $150. ISBN: 0-87661-937-. [REVIEW]John K. Papadopoulos - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (02):615-.
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  48.  25
    Ethical Decision Making and Organizational Behavior: A Case of Life and Death. [REVIEW]John K. Ross, Sherry K. Ross & Bruce A. McClung - 2006 - HEC Forum 18 (3):193-206.
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  49.  16
    An Outline of a Pragmatic Method for Deciding What To Do.John K. Alexander - 2011 - Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association (American Philosophical Practitioners Association) 6 (2).
  50.  9
    Plateaus, Dips, and Leaps: Where to Look for Inventions and Discoveries During Skilled Performance.Wayne D. Gray & John K. Lindstedt - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1838-1870.
    The framework of plateaus, dips, and leaps shines light on periods when individuals may be inventing new methods of skilled performance. We begin with a review of the role performance plateaus have played in experimental psychology, human–computer interaction, and cognitive science. We then reanalyze two classic studies of individual performance to show plateaus and dips which resulted in performance leaps. For a third study, we show how the statistical methods of Changepoint Analysis plus a few simple heuristics may direct our (...)
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