23 found
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  1. A Systematic, Large-Scale Study of Synaesthesia: Implications for the Role of Early Experience in Lexical-Colour Associations.Anina N. Rich, John L. Bradshaw & Jason B. Mattingley - 2005 - Cognition 98 (1):53-84.
  2.  15
    Hemispheric Asymmetry: Verbal and Spatial Encoding of Visual Stimuli.Gina Geffen, John L. Bradshaw & Norman C. Nettleton - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):25.
  3. Unconscious Priming Eliminates Automatic Binding of Colour and Alphanumeric Form in Synaesthesia.Jason B. Mattingley, Anina N. Rich, Greg Yelland & John L. Bradshaw - 2001 - Nature 410 (6828):580-582.
  4.  8
    Peripherally Presented and Unreported Words May Bias the Perceived Meaning of a Centrally Fixated Homograph.John L. Bradshaw - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (6):1200.
  5.  22
    Ear Asymmetry and Delayed Auditory Feedback: Effects of Task Requirements and Competitive Stimulation.John L. Bradshaw, Norman C. Nettleton & Gina Geffen - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (3):269.
  6.  11
    Double Trouble: An Evolutionary Cut at the Dichotomy Pie.John L. Bradshaw & Norman C. Nettleton - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):79-91.
  7.  26
    Left to Right: Representational Biases for Numbers and the Effect of Visuomotor Adaptation.Andrea M. Loftus, Michael E. R. Nicholls, Jason B. Mattingley & John L. Bradshaw - 2008 - Cognition 107 (3):1048-1058.
    Adaptation to right-shifting prisms improves left neglect for mental number line bisection. This study examined whether adaptation affects the mental number line in normal participants. Thirty-six participants completed a mental number line task before and after adaptation to either: left-shifting prisms, right-shifting prisms or control spectacles that did not shift the visual scene. Participants viewed number triplets (e.g. 16, 36, 55) and determined whether the numerical distance was greater on the left or right side of the inner number. Participants demonstrated (...)
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  8.  7
    Sex and Side: A Double Dichotomy Interacts.John L. Bradshaw - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):229-230.
  9.  24
    Asymmetries in Preparation for Action.John L. Bradshaw - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (5):184-185.
  10.  34
    Gesture in Language Evolution: Could I but Raise My Hand to It!John L. Bradshaw - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):213-214.
    An intervening gestural stage in language evolution, though seductive, is ultimately redundant, and is not necessarily supported by modern human or chimp behaviour. The findings and arguments offered from mirror neurones, anatomy, and lateralization are capable of other interpretations, and the manipulative dextrality of chimps is under-recognized. While language certainly possesses certain unique properties, its roots are ancient.
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  11.  20
    Hemispheric Specialization: Return to a House Divided.John L. Bradshaw & Norman C. Nettleton - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):528.
  12.  16
    A Unique Look at Face Processing: The Impact of Masked Faces on the Processing of Facial Features.Mark A. Williams, Simon A. Moss & John L. Bradshaw - 2004 - Cognition 91 (2):155-172.
  13.  17
    Mental Duality, Unity and Multiplicity, and a Holographic Model of the Mind.John L. Bradshaw - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (4):732.
  14.  16
    Reading and the Right Hemisphere.John L. Bradshaw - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (2):367-368.
  15.  15
    Identification of Mirror-Reversed and Nonreversed Facial Profiles in Same and Opposite Visual Fields.John L. Bradshaw, Norman C. Nettleton & Kay Patterson - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (1):42-48.
  16.  11
    Articulatory Interference and the Mown-Down Heterophone Effect.John L. Bradshaw & Norman C. Nettleton - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (1):88.
  17.  10
    Reinventing Hemisphere Differences.John L. Bradshaw - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):635-635.
  18.  8
    Ear Differences and Delayed Auditory Feedback: Effects on a Speech and a Music Task.John L. Bradshaw, Norman C. Nettleton & Gina Geffen - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):85.
  19.  9
    But What About Nonprimate Asymmetries and Nonmanual Primate Asymmetries?John L. Bradshaw - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):264-265.
  20.  9
    In Two Minds.John L. Bradshaw - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):101-102.
  21.  8
    Handedness and Human Cerebral Asymmetry: Some Unanswered Questions.John L. Bradshaw - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):286-287.
  22.  12
    Predicting Relationships Between Speed and Accuracy of Targetting Movements is Important.James G. Phillips, Mark A. Bellgrove & John L. Bradshaw - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):319-320.
    While explaining a large proportion of any variance, accounts of the speed and accuracy of targetting movements use techniques (e.g., log transforms) that typically reduce variability before ''explaining'' the data. Therefore the predictive power of such accounts are important. We consider whether Plamondon's model can account for kinematics of targetting movements of clinical populations.
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  23.  6
    Hemispheric Laterality and an Evolutionary Perspective.John L. Bradshaw - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):21-22.