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John L. Tienson [23]John Leander Tienson [1]
  1. Phenomenal Intentionality and the Brain in a Vat.Terence E. Horgan, John L. Tienson & George Graham - 2004 - In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter.
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  2.  98
    The Phenomenology of First-Person Agency.Terence E. Horgan, John L. Tienson & George Graham - 2003 - In Sven Walter & Heinz-Dieter Heckmann (eds.), Physicalism and Mental Causation. Imprint Academic. pp. 323.
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  3.  37
    Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mind.Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (eds.) - 1991 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    "A third of the papers in this volume originated at the 1987 Spindel Conference ... at Memphis State University"--Pref.
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  4.  88
    Consciousness and Intentionality.George Graham, Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 468--484.
  5.  98
    Deconstructing New Wave Materialism.Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson - 2001 - In Carl Gillett & Barry M. Loewer (eds.), Physicalism and its Discontents. Cambridge University Press. pp. 307--318.
    In the first post World War II identity theories (e.g., Place 1956, Smart 1962), mind brain identities were held to be contingent. However, in work beginning in the late 1960's, Saul Kripke (1971, 1980) convinced the philosophical community that true identity statements involving names and natural kind terms are necessarily true and furthermore, that many such necessary identities can only be known a posteriori. Kripke also offered an explanation of the a posteriori nature of ordinary theoretical identities such as that (...)
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  6. A Nonclassical Framework for Cognitive Science.Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson - 1994 - Synthese 101 (3):305-45.
    David Marr provided a useful framework for theorizing about cognition within classical, AI-style cognitive science, in terms of three levels of description: the levels of (i) cognitive function, (ii) algorithm and (iii) physical implementation. We generalize this framework: (i) cognitive state transitions, (ii) mathematical/functional design and (iii) physical implementation or realization. Specifying the middle, design level to be the theory of dynamical systems yields a nonclassical, alternative framework that suits (but is not committed to) connectionism. We consider how a brain's (...)
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  7.  39
    An Introduction to Connectionism.John L. Tienson - 1988 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (S1):1-16.
  8.  32
    Settling Into a New Paradigm.Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy Supplement 26 (S1):97-113.
  9. Internal-World Skepticism and Mental Self-Presentation.Terence E. Horgan, John L. Tienson & George Graham - 2006 - In Uriah Kriegel & Kenneth Williford (eds.), Self-Representational Approaches to Consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 41-61.
  10.  18
    A Conception of Metaphysics.John L. Tienson - 1989 - American Philosophical Quarterly 26 (1):63 - 71.
  11.  67
    Brains Are Not Conscious.John L. Tienson - 1987 - Philosophical Papers 16 (November):187-93.
  12.  73
    Resemblance and General Terms.John L. Tienson - 1988 - Philosophical Studies 54 (1):87 - 108.
    Any successful account of general terms must explain our ability to apply terms correctly to new instances. Many philosophers have thought resemblance offers an ontologically sparse basis for such an account. However, Any natural and plausible account of general terms on the basis of resemblance requires quite a rich ontology, Including at least second order properties and relations. Given a sufficiently rich structure of resemblances, We can surely account for the application of many general terms. I argue, However, That our (...)
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  13.  39
    Levels of Description in Nonclassical Cognitive Science.Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson - 1992 - Philosophy 34:159-188.
    David Marr provided an influential account of levels of description in classical cognitive science. In this paper we contrast Marr'ent with some alternatives that are suggested by the recent emergence of connectionism. Marr's account is interesting and important both because of the levels of description it distinguishes, and because of the way his presentation reflects some of the most basic, foundational, assumptions of classical AI-style cognitive science . Thus, by focusing on levels of description, one can sharpen foundational differences between (...)
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  14.  13
    Is This Any Way to Be a Realist?John L. Tienson - 1990 - Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):155-164.
    Abstract Andy Clark argues that the reality and causal efficacy of the folk psychological attitudes do not require in?the?head correlates of the that?clauses by which they are attributed. The facts for which Fodor invokes a language of thought as empirical explanation?systemati?city, for example?are, Clark argues, an a priori conceptual demand upon propositional attitude ascription, and hence not in need of empirical explanation. However, no such strategy can work. A priori demands imposed by our practices do not eliminate the need for (...)
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  15.  11
    About Competence.John L. Tienson - 1990 - Philosophical Papers 19 (1):19-36.
  16. Authors' Replies.Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson - 1999 - Acta Analytica 144:275-287.
  17.  88
    Cognition Needs Syntax but Not Rules.Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson - 2006 - In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Malden MA: Blackwell. pp. 147--158.
    Human cognition is rich, varied, and complex. In this Chapter we argue that because of the richness of human cognition (and human mental life generally), there must be a syntax of cognitive states, but because of this very richness, cognitive processes cannot be describable by exceptionless rules. The argument for syntax, in Section 1, has to do with being able to get around in any number of possible environments in a complex world. Since nature did not know where in the (...)
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  18. Structured Representations in Connectionist Systems?Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson - 1991 - In S. Davis (ed.), Connectionism: Theorye and Practice. Oxford University Press.
  19.  22
    An Argument Concerning Quantification and Propositional Attitudes.John L. Tienson - 1987 - Philosophical Studies 51 (2):145 - 168.
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  20.  28
    Entia Successiva and Ordinary Things.John L. Tienson - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):475-479.
  21.  8
    Entia Successiva and Ordinary Things.John L. Tienson - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):475-479.
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  22. Introduction to Connectionism.John L. Tienson - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy (Suppl.) 1:1-16.
  23.  54
    Synonyms and the Objects of Belief.John L. Tienson - 1982 - Philosophical Studies 42 (3):297 - 313.