107 found
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  1. Universes.John Leslie - 1989 - New York: Routledge.
    One of the first books to address what has come to be known as the philosophy of cosmology, Universes asks, "Why does the universe exist?", arguing that the universe is "fine tuned for producing life." For example, if the universe's early expansion speed had been smaller by one part in a million, then it would have recollapsed rapidly; with an equivalently tiny speed increase, no galaxies would have formed. Either way, this universe would have been lifeless.
  2.  7
    Universes.John Leslie - 1989 - London: Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  3.  6
    Universes.John Leslie - 1989 - New York: Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  4.  32
    Universes.John Leslie - 1989 - New York: Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
  5.  63
    Value and Existence.John Leslie - 1979 - Blackwell.
  6. The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction.John Leslie - 1996 - Routledge.
    Are we in imminent danger of extinction? Yes, we probably are, argues John Leslie in his chilling account of the dangers facing the human race as we approach the second millenium. The End of the World is a sobering assessment of the many disasters that scientists have predicted and speculated on as leading to apocalypse. In the first comprehensive survey, potential catastrophes - ranging from deadly diseases to high-energy physics experiments - are explored to help us understand the risks. One (...)
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  7.  17
    The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction.John Leslie - 1996 - Philosophy 72 (279):158-160.
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  8. The End of the World.John Leslie - 2000 - Mind 109 (433):155-158.
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  9. Value and Existence.John Leslie - 1981 - Religious Studies 17 (1):129-131.
     
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  10.  93
    Infinite minds: a philosophical cosmology.John Leslie - 2001 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The cosmos exists just because of the ethical need for it We, and all the intricate structures of our universe, exist as thoughts in a divine mind that knows everything worth knowing. There could also be infinitely many other universes in this mind....It may be hard to believe that the universe is as Leslie says it is--but it is also hard to resist his compelling ideas and arguments.
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  11. Is the end of the world nigh?John Leslie - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (158):65-72.
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  12.  54
    The Mystery of Existence: Why is There Anything at All.John Leslie & Robert Lawrence Kuhn (eds.) - 2013 - Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This compelling study of the origins of all that exists, including explanations of the entire material world, traces the responses of philosophers and scientists to the most elemental and haunting question of all: why is _anything_ here—or anything _anywhere_? Why is there something rather than nothing? Why not nothing? It includes the thoughts of dozens of luminaries from Plato and Aristotle to Aquinas and Leibniz to modern thinkers such as physicists Stephen Hawking and Steven Weinberg, philosophers Robert Nozick and Derek (...)
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  13. Value and Existence.John Leslie - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (212):275-277.
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  14. Infinite Minds: A Philosophical Cosmology.John Leslie - 2001 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 194 (4):491-491.
     
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  15. Time and the anthropic principle.John Leslie - 1992 - Mind 101 (403):521-540.
    Carter’s anthropic principle reminds us that intelligent life can find itself only in life-permitting times, places or universes. The principle concerns a possible observational selection effect, not a designing deity. It has no special concern with humans, nor does it say that intelligent life is inevitable and common. Barrow and Tipler, who discuss all this, are not biologically ignorant. As argued in "Universes" (Leslie, 1989) they may well be right in thinking that "fine tuning" of force strengths and particle masses, (...)
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  16. Infinite Minds, a Philosophical Cosmology.John Leslie - 2001 - Philosophy 77 (302):625-634.
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  17. Doom and probabilities.John Leslie - 1993 - Mind 102 (407):489-491.
  18. No Inverse Gambler’s Fallacy in Cosmology.John Leslie - 1988 - Mind 97 (386):269-272.
  19. Anthropic Principle, World Ensemble, Design.John Leslie - 1982 - American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (2):141 - 151.
  20.  29
    Immortality Defended.John Leslie - 2007 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Might we be parts of a divine mind? Could anything like an afterlife make sense? Starting with a Platonic answer to why the world exists, _Immortality Defended_ suggests we could well be immortal in all of three separate ways. Tackles the fundamental questions posed by our very existence, among them, "why does the cosmos exist?", "is there a divine mind or God?", and "in what sense might we have afterlives?" Defends a belief in immortality, without the need for a religious (...)
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  21.  50
    Observer‐relative chances and the doomsday argument.John Leslie - 1997 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):427 – 436.
    Suppose various observers are divided randomly into two groups, a large and a small. Not knowing into which group anyone has been sent, each can have strong grounds for believing in being in the large group, although recognizing that every observer in the other group has equally powerful reasons for thinking of this other group as the large one. Justified belief can therefore be observer-relative in a rather paradoxical way. Appreciating this allows one to reject an intriguing new objection against (...)
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  22.  18
    Physical Cosmology and Philosophy.John Leslie & Paul Edwards - 1990 - Macmillan Publishing Company.
  23.  62
    What God might be.John Leslie - 2019 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 85 (1):63-75.
    As Plato suggested, the cosmos may exist because this is ethically necessary. It then might well consist of infinitely many minds, each itself infinite through eternally knowing all that was worth knowing. Our universe would exist inside one of them, as a pattern in its thought. But intrinsic value could be a fiction, making Plato’s suggestion a non-starter. Again, indeterministic free will might have immense value. Those infinite minds could then differ from one another in constantly changing ways through the (...)
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  24.  63
    Cosmology and theology.John Leslie - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  25.  66
    Doomsday revisited.John Leslie - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (166):85-89.
  26.  64
    Efforts to explain all existence.John Leslie - 1978 - Mind 87 (346):181-194.
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  27.  11
    Platonic Creation.John Leslie - 2007 - In Immortality Defended. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 16–34.
    This chapter contains section titled: The Good of Plato as a Creative Principle God as a Creative Principle; God as a Creating Person; or God as the Entire Cosmos Initial Objections to the Platonic Theory If the Platonic Approach is Correct, Why Struggle to Produce Good Things? How Creative Power might be Real Necessarily Creative Value Would Not Be Something Complex.
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  28.  22
    The Riddle of Existence: An Essay in Idealistic Metaphysics. Nicholas Rescher.John Leslie - 1985 - Philosophy of Science 52 (3):485-486.
  29.  94
    Ensuring two Bird deaths with one throw.John Leslie - 1991 - Mind 100 (1):73-86.
  30. The Theory That the World Exists Because It Should.John Leslie - 1970 - American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (4):286 - 298.
  31.  20
    Universes.Physical Cosmology and Philosophy.John Leslie - 1994 - Noûs 28 (2):262-269.
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  32.  49
    Modern Cosmology & Philosophy.John Leslie (ed.) - 1998 - Prometheus Books.
    Did the universe originate from a "big bang" as argued by leading astrophysicists and others? Or does some other theory more accurately describe its beginnings? Are there other forms of life in the universe? What about other universes? This volume discusses these and other topics in this hotly debated area where philosophy and science meet.
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  33. Observership in cosmology: The anthropic principle.John Leslie - 1983 - Mind 92 (368):573-579.
  34.  15
    Immortality Defended.John Leslie (ed.) - 2007 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Might we be parts of a divine mind? Could anything like an afterlife make sense? Starting with a Platonic answer to why the world exists, _Immortality Defended_ suggests we could well be immortal in all of three separate ways. Tackles the fundamental questions posed by our very existence, among them, "why does the cosmos exist?", "is there a divine mind or God?", and "in what sense might we have afterlives?" Defends a belief in immortality, without the need for a religious (...)
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  35.  54
    The world's necessary existence.John Leslie - 1980 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (4):207 - 224.
  36.  47
    Ethically Required Existence.John Leslie - 1972 - American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (3):215 - 224.
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  37.  43
    Mackie on Neoplatonism's 'Replacement for God'.John Leslie - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (3-4):325 - 342.
    David Hume's greatness depends in large part on how his writings hint at beautiful and coherent theories which are recognizably Humean despite their divergences from the untidy originals. Now, perhaps the clearest vision of a contradiction–free Platonic Form of Hume was had by J. L. Mackie; he described it in such masterpieces as The Cement of the Universe, Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong, and The Miracle of Theism. How successful is this last in its attack on theism? I shall discuss (...)
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  38.  51
    The need to generate happy people.John Leslie - 1989 - Philosophia 19 (1):29-33.
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  39. The risk that humans will soon be extinct.John Leslie - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (4):447-463.
    If it survives for a little longer, the human race will probably start to spread across its galaxy. Germ warfare, though, or environmental collapse or many another factor might shortly drive humans to extinction. Are they likely to avoid it? Well, suppose they spread across the galaxy. Of all humans who would ever have been born, maybe only one in a hundred thousand would have lived as early as you. If, in contrast, humans soon became extinct then because of the (...)
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  40. Infinity and the Problem of Evil.John Leslie - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (2):111-117.
    God seemingly had a duty to create minds each of infinite worth through possessing God-like knowledge. People might object that God’s own infinite worth was all that was needed, or that no mind that God created could have truly infinite worth; however, such objections fail. Yet this does not generate an unsolvable Problem of Evil. We could exist inside an infinite mind that was one among endlessly many, perhaps all created by Platonic Necessity. “God” might be our name for this (...)
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  41. A way of picturing God.John Leslie - 2016 - In Andrei A. Buckareff & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), Alternative Concepts of God: Essays on the Metaphysics of the Divine. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
     
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  42. Design and the Anthropic principle.John Leslie - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):349-354.
  43.  28
    The Doomsday Argument.John Leslie - 2009 - In Susan Schneider (ed.), Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 277–278.
    This chapter provides a brief version of the mathematician Brandon Carter's “doomsday argument”, a probabilistic argument that attempts to predict the future lifetime of the human race given an estimate of the total number of humans born thus far. It challenges Carter's argument by stating the crucial point that we ought (until we find enough contrary evidence) to try to see ourselves as “fairly ordinary” inside the various classes into which we fall ‐ bearing in mind, naturally, that in some (...)
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  44. Current Issues in Teleology.John Leslie - 1986 - Univ Pr of America.
     
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  45.  40
    Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions.Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better if we were immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Life, Death, and Meaning brings together key readings, primarily by English-speaking philosophers, on such 'big questions.'.
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  46. How to Draw Conclusions from a Fine-Tuned Cosmos.John Leslie - 1997 - In Physics, Philosophy, and Theology: A Common Quest for Understanding. Vatican Observatory.
    Physical force strengths, particle masses, the early cosmic expansion speed and many other factors seem "fine tuned for life". Had they been slightly different, life’s evolution would have been impossible. The situation resembles catching a fish with an apparatus unable to catch ones slightly differently sized. One explanation is that the lake contains fish of many different sizes: multiple universes with randomized characteristics, most of them unobservable because observers cannot evolve in them. Another is that God created a fish of (...)
     
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  47.  17
    Fine Tuning and Divine Design.John Leslie - 2002 - Maritain Studies/Etudes Maritainiennes 18:3 - 13.
    Force strengths, particle masses, etcetera, appear "fine tuned" for intelligent life. There may be many very diverse universes, observational selection explaining why we see a life-permitting one. The alternative is divine selection. The God hypothesis can explain how one and the same force strength or particle mass satisfies life’s many different requirements, and why there are life-encouraging laws of relativity and of quantum theory. It could also answer why any universe exists. God’s existence could be accounted for Platonically, by its (...)
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  48.  26
    Testing the Doomsday Argument.John Leslie - 1994 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (1):31-44.
    ABSTRACT Brandon Carter's anthropic principle reminds us that observers are most likely to find themselves in the spatiotemporal regions containing most of them. One should tend to prefer theories which make one's own observed spatiotemporal position fairly ordinary. This could much increase the estimated likelihood that our technological civilisation was not the very first in a universe which would include hugely many such civilisations. Similarly, which is the Carter‐Leslie ‘doomsday argument’, it could much increase the estimated likelihood that you and (...)
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  49. Anthropic prediction.John Leslie - 1994 - Philosophia 23 (1-4):117-144.
  50.  15
    Morality in a World Guaranteed Best Possible.John Leslie - 1971 - Studia Leibnitiana 3 (3):199 - 205.
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