Results for 'John Locke Bacon'

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  1.  46
    Locke, Bacon and Natural History.Peter R. Anstey - 2002 - Early Science and Medicine 7 (1):65-92.
    This paper argues that the construction of natural histories, as advocated by Francis Bacon, played a central role in John Locke's conception of method in natural philosophy. It presents new evidence in support of John Yolton's claim that "the emphasis upon compiling natural histories of bodies ... was the chief aspect of the Royal Society's programme that attracted Locke, and from which we need to understand his science of nature". Locke's exposure to the natural (...)
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  2.  60
    John Locke and Natural Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Peter Anstey presents a thorough and innovative study of John Locke's views on the method and content of natural philosophy. Focusing on Locke's Essay concerning Human Understanding, but also drawing extensively from his other writings and manuscript remains, Anstey argues that Locke was an advocate of the Experimental Philosophy: the new approach to natural philosophy championed by Robert Boyle and the early Royal Society who were opposed to speculative philosophy. On the question of method, Anstey shows (...)
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  3. Paul Thagard.John Locke Bacon, David Hume & Immanuel Kant - 2010 - In Julie Thompson Klein & Carl Mitcham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Interdisciplinarity. Oxford University Press.
  4. Conduct of the Understanding by John Locke, Esq. Essays, Moral Economical, & Political.John Locke & Francis Bacon - 1845 - Joseph Smith.
     
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  5. The Conduct of the Understanding, by J. Locke. Essays, Moral, Economical & Political, by F. Bacon. With Sketches of the Lives of Locke and Bacon[REVIEW]John Locke & Francis Bacon - 1813
     
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  6.  4
    The Reasonableness of Christianity.John Locke - 1695 - A. And C. Black.
    John Locke (29 August 1632 - 28 October 1704) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism". Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Sir Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social contract theory. His work greatly affected the development of epistemology and political philosophy. His writings influenced Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, many Scottish (...)
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  7.  53
    Locke’s Experimental Philosophy: Peter R. Anstey: John Locke and Natural Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, 256pp, $65 HB.Matthew Stuart, Keith Campbell, Michael Jacovides & Peter Anstey - 2013 - Metascience 22 (1):1-22.
    Serious philosophical reflection on the nature of experiment began in earnest in the seventeenth century. This paper expounds the most influential philosophy of experiment in seventeenth-century England, the Bacon-Boyle-Hooke view of experiment. It is argued that this can only be understood in the context of the new experimental philosophy practised according to the Baconian theory of natural history. The distinctive typology of experiments of this view is discussed, as well as its account of the relation between experiment and theory. (...)
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  8. The Conduct of the Understanding.John Locke & Francis Bacon - 1825 - Printed for C. And J. Rivington [Etc.].
     
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  9.  31
    The Great Instauration--Proemium, Preface, Plan of the Work, and Novum Organum.Leviathan.An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. [REVIEW]H. W. S., Francis Bacon, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke & Gail Kennedy - 1937 - Journal of Philosophy 34 (12):334.
  10.  64
    Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy.Hannah Dawson - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In a powerful and original contribution to the history of ideas, Hannah Dawson explores the intense preoccupation with language in early-modern philosophy, and presents a groundbreaking analysis of John Locke's critique of words. By examining a broad sweep of pedagogical and philosophical material from antiquity to the late seventeenth century, Dr Dawson explains why language caused anxiety in writers such as Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Gassendi, Nicole, Pufendorf, Boyle, Malebranche and Locke. Locke, Language and Early-Modern (...)
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  11.  22
    Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition.Sorana Corneanu - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    Francis Bacon and the art of direction -- An art of tempering the mind -- The distempered mind and the tree of knowledge -- A comprehensive culture of the mind -- The end of knowledge -- The study of nature as regimen -- Cultura and medicina animi: an early modern tradition -- The physician of the soul -- Sources -- Genres -- Utility: practical versus speculative knowledge -- Self-love and the fallen/uncultured mind -- The office of reason -- Passions, (...)
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  12.  11
    Francis Bacon's Doctrine of Idols: A Diagnosis of ‘Universal Madness’.S. V. Weeks - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (1):1-39.
    The doctrine of idols is one of the most famous aspects of Bacon's thought. Yet his claim that the idols lead to madness has gone almost entirely unnoticed. This paper argues that Bacon's theory of idols underlies his diagnosis of the contemporary condition as one of ‘universal madness’. In contrast to interpretations that locate his doctrine of error and recovery within the biblical narrative of the Fall, the present analysis focuses on the material and cultural sources of the (...)
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  13.  35
    Locke on Scientific Methodology.Huaping Lu-Adler - 2021 - In Jessica Gordon-Roth & Shelley Weinberg (eds.), The Lockean Mind. pp. 277-89.
    This chapter brings some much-needed conceptual clarity to the debate about Locke’s scientific methodology. Instead of having to choose between the method of hypothesis and that of natural history (as most interpreters have thought), he would resist prescribing a single method for natural sciences in general. Following Francis Bacon and Robert Boyle, Locke separates medicine and natural philosophy (physics), so that they call for completely different methods. While a natural philosopher relies on “speculative” (causal-theoretical) hypotheses together with (...)
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  14. Locke, Science and Politics.Steven Forde - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this groundbreaking book, Steven Forde argues that John Locke's devotion to modern science deeply shaped his moral and political philosophy. Beginning with an account of the classical approach to natural and moral philosophy, and of the medieval scholasticism that took these forward into early modernity, Forde explores why the modern scientific project of Francis Bacon, Pierre Gassendi, Robert Boyle and others required the rejection of the classical approach. Locke fully subscribed to this rejection, and took (...)
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  15.  31
    The Correspondence of John Locke.John Locke - 1976 - Clarendon Press.
    E. S. de Beer>'s eight-volume edition of the correspondence of John Locke is a classic of modern scholarship. The intellectual range of the correspondence is universal, covering philosophy, theology, medicine, history, geography, economics, law, politics, travel and botany. This first volume covers the years 1650 to 1679.
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  16.  5
    The Works of John Locke.John Locke - 1727 - Printed for T. Tegg, W. Sharpe and Son [Etc.].
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps, and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely (...)
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  17. The Library of John Locke.John Locke, John R. Harrison & Peter Laslett - 1965 - Published for the Oxford Bibliographical Society by the Oxford University Press.
     
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  18.  4
    The English Philosophers: From Bacon to Mill.Edwin A. Burtt (ed.) - 1939 - Modern Library.
    The thirteen essays in this Modern Library edition comprise a complete survey of the golden age of English philosophy. The anthology begins in the early seventeenth century with Francis Bacon's comprehensive program for the total reorganization of all knowledge; it culminates, some two hundred and fifty years later, with John Stuart Mill. The thinkers represented here are the creators of the twentieth-century world. Indebted to them is a long line of economists, sociologists, and political leaders whose work has (...)
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  19.  3
    The Works of John Locke, in Nine Volumes.John Locke - 1824 - Printed for C. And J. Rivington ; J. Parker, Oxford; and Stirling and Slade, Edinburgh.
  20.  28
    John Locke.John Locke & Maurice Cranston - 1949 - Philosophy 24 (90):287-.
  21.  10
    Locke as an Empiricist.Douglas Odegard - 1965 - Philosophy 40 (153):185 - 196.
    John Loke is often referred to as the first of a triumvirate of major British Empiricists, and sometimes even as the father of British Empiricism. In many cases the reference is extremely guarded, and at times the word ‘empiricist’ is being used merely as a convenient label for organising university courses, amounting to little more than a synonym for ‘Locke, Berkeley, and Hume, and to some extent Bacon, Hobbes, Reid, and Mill’. Given that ‘empiricist’ is being used (...)
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  22. John Locke on Education.John Locke & Peter Gay - 1964 - Teachers College Press, Columbia University.
  23.  31
    The Educational Writings of John Locke.James L. Axtell & John Locke - 1969 - British Journal of Educational Studies 17 (1):97-98.
  24. The Political Thought of John Locke: An Historical Account of the Argument of the 'Two Treatises of Government'.John Dunn - 1969 - London: Cambridge University Press.
    This study provides a comprehensive reinterpretation of the meaning of Locke's political thought. John Dunn restores Locke's ideas to their exact context, and so stresses the historical question of what Locke in the Two Treatises of Government was intending to claim. By adopting this approach, he reveals the predominantly theological character of all Locke's thinking about politics and provides a convincing analysis of the development of Locke's thought. In a polemical concluding section, John (...)
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  25.  3
    John Locke's of the Conduct of the Understanding.John Locke - 1966 - New York: Teachers College Press.
  26. John Locke and the Way of Ideas.John W. Yolton - 1956 - Oxford, Clarendon Press.
  27. John Locke: A Biography.John W. Yolton - 1958 - Philosophical Review 67 (4):554-557.
  28.  4
    John Locke: Essays on the Law of Nature: The Latin Text with a Translation, Introduction, and Notes ; Together with Transcripts of Locke's Shorthand in His Journal for 1676.John Locke - 2002 - Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press ;.
    Written before his better-known philosophical works, these essays fully explain how natural law is known and to what extent it is binding.
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  29.  8
    John Locke and Christianity: Contemporary Responses to the Reasonableness of Christianity.Victor Nuovo & John Locke (eds.) - 1997 - Thoemmes Press.
    The Reasonableness of Christianity is a major work by one of the greatest modern philosophers. Published anonymously in 1695, it entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labelled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions, and perhaps no one (...)
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  30.  6
    John Locke.John W. Yolton & D. J. O'Connor - 1953 - Philosophical Review 62 (3):458.
  31. The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding.John Locke & Peter H. Nidditch - 1979 - Clarendon Press.
    This paperback edition reproduces the complete text of the Essay as prepared by professor Nidditch for The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke. The Register of Formal Variants and the Glossary are omitted and Professor Nidditch has written a new foreword.
     
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  32. Reference and Existence: The John Locke Lectures.Saul A. Kripke - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Reference and Existence, Saul Kripke's John Locke Lectures for 1973, can be read as a sequel to his classic Naming and Necessity. It confronts important issues left open in that work -- among them, the semantics of proper names and natural kind terms as they occur in fiction and in myth; negative existential statements; the ontology of fiction and myth. In treating these questions, he makes a number of methodological observations that go beyond the framework of his earlier (...)
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  33. John Locke: Resistance, Religion and Responsibility.John Marshall - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    A major account of the development of the political, religious, social and moral thought of John Locke.
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  34.  9
    John Locke, Thomas Sydenham, and the Authorship of Two Medical Essays.Peter R. Anstey & John Burrows - 2009 - Electronic British Library Journal 3:1-42.
    Two medical essays in the hand of John Locke survive amongst the Shaftesbury Papers in the National Archives (National Archives PRO 30/24/47/2, ff. 31r–38v and ff. 49r–56r). Since the 1960s their authorship has been disputed. Some scholars have attributed them to the London physician Thomas Sydenham, others have attributed them to Locke. Detailed analyses of their contents and the context of their composition provide very strong evidence for Lockean authorship. This is reinforced by the application of the (...)
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  35. The Works of John Locke (in 9 Vols.).John Locke - unknown
     
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  36. John Locke and America: The Defence of English Colonialism.Barbara Arneil - 1996 - Oxford Unioversity Press.
    This book considers the context of the colonial policies of Britain, Locke's contribution to them, and the importance of these ideas in his theory of property. It also reconsiders the debate about John Locke's influence in America. The book argues that Locke's theory of property must be understood in connection with the philosopher's political concerns, as part of his endeavour to justify the colonialist policies of Lord Shaftesbury's cabinet, with which he was personally associated. The author (...)
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  37.  15
    John Locke and the Way of Ideas.John Linnell - 1958 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 19 (2):256-257.
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  38.  55
    John Locke and the Ethics of Belief.Nicholas Wolterstorff - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Nicholas Wolterstorff discusses the ethics of belief which Locke developed in Book IV of his Essay Concerning Human Understanding, where Locke finally argued his overarching aim: how we ought to govern our belief, especially on matters of religion and morality. Wolterstorff shows that this concern was instigated by the collapse, in Locke's day, of a once-unified moral and religious tradition in Europe into warring factions. His was thus a culturally and socially engaged epistemology. This view of (...) invites a new interpretation of the origins of modern philosophy. He maintained that instead of following tradition we ought to let 'reason be our guide.' Accordingly, after discussing Hume's powerful attack on Locke's recommended practice, Wolterstorff argues for Locke's originality and emphasizes his contribution to the 'modernity' of post-sixteenth-century philosophy. (shrink)
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  39. John Locke, Carolina, and the "Two Treatises of Government".David Armitage - 2004 - Political Theory 32 (5):602-627.
    Recent scholarship on John Locke's "Two Treatises of Government" has drawn particular attention to the colonial antecedents and applications of the theory of appropriation in chapter V of the Second Treatise. This attention has coincided with a more general interest among political theorists in the historical and theoretical relationship between liberalism and colonialism. This essay reviews the surviving evidence for Locke's knowledge of the Carolina colony and argues that it was both more extensive and more enduring than (...)
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  40.  23
    John Locke, Carolina, and the Two Treatises of Government.David Armitage - 2004 - Political Theory 32 (5):602-627.
    Recent scholarship on John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government has drawn particular attention to the colonial antecedents and applications of the theory of appropriation in chapter V of theSecond Treatise. This attention has coincided with a more general interest among political theorists in the historical and theoretical relationship between liberalism and colonialism. This essay reviews the surviving evidence for Locke’s knowledge of the Carolina colony and argues that it was both more extensive and more enduring than previous (...)
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  41.  28
    John Locke.Julius R. Weinberg - 1940 - Philosophical Review 49 (1):83-85.
  42.  65
    John Locke and the Ethics of Belief.Matthew Stuart - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (4):587.
    In this book Nicholas Wolterstorff, a well-known proponent of “Reformed epistemology,” sets out to investigate the modern origins of the evidentialist and foundationalist tradition that he opposes. He locates these origins in book 4 of Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Wolterstorff tells us that he had to overcome strong prejudices in writing the book, for “in the philosophical world I inhabit, Locke has the reputation of being boringly chatty and philosophically careless”. He suggests that the earlier parts of (...)
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  43.  74
    John Locke's Moral Philosophy.Annette C. Baier - 1984 - Philosophical Review 93 (4):615-618.
  44. John Locke & Education.John W. Yolton - 1971
     
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  45.  29
    John Locke, Natural Law and Colonialism.Barbara Arneil - 1992 - History of Political Thought 13 (4):587-603.
    In John Locke's Two Treatises of Government, the state of nature, and more particularly natural man, are created within the tradition of natural law. Several commentators, such as James Tully and Karl Olivecrona, have recognized this legacy in Locke's political thought.1 While providing an analysis of Locke's thought in relation to natural law, such studies, however, have not fully examined the global context within which both the Two Treatises and seventeenth-century natural law developed. Consequently the extent (...)
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  46. John Locke and Thomas Reid.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2017 - In Sven Bernecker & Kourken Michaelian (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory. pp. 470-479.
  47.  48
    The Political Needs of a Toolmaking Animal: Madison, Hamilton, Locke, and the Question of Property.Paul A. Rahe - 2005 - Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):1-26.
    When Benjamin Franklin suggested that man is by nature a tool-making animal, he summed up what was for his fellow Americans the common sense of the matter. It is not, then, surprising that, when Britain's colonists in North America broke with the mother country over the issue of an unrepresentative parliament's right to tax and govern the colonies, they defended their right to the property they owned on the ground that it was in a most thorough-going sense an extension of (...)
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  48. A Discourse on Property: John Locke and His Adversaries.James Tully - 1980 - Cambridge University Press.
    John Locke's theory of property is perhaps the most distinctive and the most influential aspect of his political theory. In this book James Tully uses an hermeneutical and analytical approach to offer a revolutionary revision of early modern theories of property, focusing particularly on that of Locke. Setting his analysis within the intellectual context of the seventeenth century, Professor Tully overturns the standard interpretations of Locke's theory, showing that it is not a justification of private property. (...)
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  49.  32
    John Locke on Native Right, Colonial Possession, and the Concept of Vacuum Domicilium.Paul Corcoran - 2018 - The European Legacy 23 (3):225-250.
    The early paragraphs of John Locke’s Second Treatise of Government describe a poetic idyll of property acquisition widely supposed by contemporary theorists and historians to have cast the template for imperial possessions in the New World. This reading ignores the surprises lurking in Locke’s later chapters on conquest, usurpation, and tyranny, where he affirms that native rights to lands and possessions survive to succeeding generations. Locke warned his readers that this “will seem a strange doctrine, it (...)
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  50. Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition.Sorana Corneanu - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _Regimens of the Mind_, Sorana Corneanu proposes a new approach to the epistemological and methodological doctrines of the leading experimental philosophers of seventeenth-century England, an approach that considers their often overlooked moral, psychological, and theological elements. Corneanu focuses on the views about the pursuit of knowledge in the writings of Robert Boyle and John Locke, as well as in those of several of their influences, including Francis Bacon and the early Royal Society virtuosi. She argues that (...)
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