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  1.  18
    The Philosophical Origins of Mitchell's Chemiosmotic Concepts: The Personal Factor in Scientific Theory Formulation.John N. Prebble - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):433 - 460.
    Mitchell's formulation of the chemiosmotic theory of oxidative phosphorylation in 1961 lacked any experimental support for its three central postulates. The path by which Mitchell reached this theory is explored. A major factor was the role of Mitchell's philosophical system conceived in his student days at Cambridge. This system appears to have become a tacit influence on his work in the sense that Polanyi understood all knowledge to be generated by an interaction between tacit and explicit knowing. Early in his (...)
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  2.  65
    The Discovery of Oxidative Phosphorylation: A Conceptual Off-Shoot From the Study of Glycolysis.John N. Prebble - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):253-262.
    The origins of oxidative phosphorylation, initially known as aerobic phosphorylation, grew out of three research areas of muscle metabolism, creatine phosphorylation, aerobic metabolism of lactic acid in muscle, and studies on the nature and role of adenosine triphosphate . Much of this work centred round the laboratory of Otto Meyerhof, and most of those contributing to the study of aerobic phosphorylation were influenced by that laboratory: particularly Lipmann and also Ochoa. The work of Engelhardt on ATP levels in blood also (...)
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  3.  74
    An Issue of Originality and Priority: The Correspondence and Theories of Oxidative Phosphorylation of Peter Mitchell and Robert J.P. Williams, 1961–1980. [REVIEW]Bruce H. Weber & John N. Prebble - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):125-163.
    In the same year, 1961, Peter D. Mitchell and Robert R.J.P. Williams both put forward hypotheses for the mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria and photophosphorylation in chloroplasts. Mitchell's proposal was ultimately adopted and became known as the chemiosmotic theory. Both hypotheses were based on protons and differed markedly from the then prevailing chemical theory originally proposed by E.C. Slater in 1953, which by 1961 was failing to account for a number of experimental observations. Immediately following the publication of Williams (...)
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  4.  47
    An Issue of Originality and Priority: The Correspondence and Theories of Oxidative Phosphorylation of Peter Mitchell and Robert J.P. Williams, 1961–1980.Bruce H. Weber & John N. Prebble - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):125-163.
    In the same year, 1961, Peter D. Mitchell and Robert R.J.P. Williams both put forward hypotheses for the mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria and photophosphorylation in chloroplasts. Mitchell's proposal was ultimately adopted and became known as the chemiosmotic theory. Both hypotheses were based on protons and differed markedly from the then prevailing chemical theory originally proposed by E.C. Slater in 1953, which by 1961 was failing to account for a number of experimental observations. Immediately following the publication of Williams's (...)
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  5.  11
    The Discovery of Oxidative Phosphorylation: A Conceptual Off-Shoot From the Study of Glycolysis.John N. Prebble - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):253-262.
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  6.  17
    Contrasting Approaches to a Biological Problem: Paul Boyer, Peter Mitchell and the Mechanism of the ATP Synthase, 1961–1985. [REVIEW]John N. Prebble - 2013 - Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):699-737.
    Attempts to solve the puzzling problem of oxidative phosphorylation led to four very different hypotheses each of which suggested a different view of the ATP synthase, the phosphorylating enzyme. During the 1960s and 1970s evidence began to accumulate which rendered Peter Mitchell’s chemiosmotic hypothesis, the novel part of which was the proton translocating ATP synthase (ATPase), a plausible explanation. The conformational hypothesis of Paul Boyer implied an enzyme where ATP synthesis was driven by the energy of conformational changes in the (...)
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