Results for 'John P. Gaa'

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  1. Cultivating Curious and Creative Minds: The Role of Teachers and Teacher Educators, Part I.Annette D. Digby, Gadi Alexander, Carole G. Basile, Kevin Cloninger, F. Michael Connelly, Jessica T. DeCuir-Gunby, John P. Gaa, Herbert P. Ginsburg, Angela McNeal Haynes, Ming Fang He, Terri R. Hebert, Sharon Johnson, Patricia L. Marshall, Joan V. Mast, Allison W. McCulloch, Christina Mengert, Christy M. Moroye, F. Richard Olenchak, Wynnetta Scott-Simmons, Merrie Snow, Derrick M. Tennial, P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Shijing Xu & JeongAe You (eds.) - 2010 - R&L Education.
    Presents a plethora of approaches to developing human potential in areas not conventionally addressed. Organized in two parts, this international collection of essays provides viable educational alternatives to those currently holding sway in an era of high-stakes accountability.
     
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  2.  19
    Punishment and Race: John P. Pittman.John P. Pittman - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (1):115-130.
    This article criticizes the standard way philosophers pose issues about the core practices of criminal justice institutions. Attempting to get at some of the presuppositions of posing these issues in terms of punishment, I construct a revised version of Rawls's ‘telishment’ case, a revision based on actual features of contemporary criminal justice practices in the USA. In addressing the implications of ‘racialment’, as I call it, some connections are made to current philosophical discussions about race. I conclude with brief remarks (...)
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  3.  85
    The Sceptical Realism of David Hume.John P. Wright - 1983 - Manchester Up.
    Introduction A brief look at the competing present-day interpretations of Hume's philosophy will leave the uninitiated reader completely baffled. On the one hand , Hume is seen as a philosopher who attempted to analyse concepts with ...
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  4. When is a Robot a Moral Agent.John P. Sullins - 2006 - International Review of Information Ethics 6 (12):23-30.
    In this paper Sullins argues that in certain circumstances robots can be seen as real moral agents. A distinction is made between persons and moral agents such that, it is not necessary for a robot to have personhood in order to be a moral agent. I detail three requirements for a robot to be seen as a moral agent. The first is achieved when the robot is significantly autonomous from any programmers or operators of the machine. The second is when (...)
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  5.  38
    Platonism and Anti-Platonism in Mathematics.John P. Burgess - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):79.
    Mathematics tells us there exist infinitely many prime numbers. Nominalist philosophy, introduced by Goodman and Quine, tells us there exist no numbers at all, and so no prime numbers. Nominalists are aware that the assertion of the existence of prime numbers is warranted by the standards of mathematical science; they simply reject scientific standards of warrant.
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  6.  41
    Truth and the Absence of Fact.John P. Burgess - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (4):602-604.
    This volume reprints a dozen of the author’s papers, most with substantial postscripts, and adds one new one. The bulk of the material is on topics in philosophy of language, but there are also two papers on philosophy of mathematics written after the appearance of the author’s collected papers on that subject, and one on epistemology. As to the substance of Field’s contributions, limitations of space preclude doing much more below than indicating the range of issues addressed, and the general (...)
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  7. Hume's 'a Treatise of Human Nature': An Introduction.John P. Wright - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature presents the most important account of skepticism in the history of modern philosophy. In this lucid and thorough introduction to the work, John P. Wright examines the development of Hume's ideas in the Treatise, their relation to eighteenth-century theories of the imagination and passions, and the reception they received when Hume published the Treatise. He explains Hume's arguments concerning the inability of reason to establish the basic beliefs which underlie science and morals, (...)
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  8. Robowarfare: Can Robots Be More Ethical Than Humans on the Battlefield? [REVIEW]John P. Sullins - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (3):263-275.
    Telerobotically operated and semiautonomous machines have become a major component in the arsenals of industrial nations around the world. By the year 2015 the United States military plans to have one-third of their combat aircraft and ground vehicles robotically controlled. Although there are many reasons for the use of robots on the battlefield, perhaps one of the most interesting assertions are that these machines, if properly designed and used, will result in a more just and ethical implementation of warfare. This (...)
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  9. Hume’s Academic Scepticism: A Reappraisal of His Philosophy of Human Understanding.John P. Wright - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):407-435.
    A philosopher once wrote the following words:If I examine the PTOLOMAIC and COPERNICAN systems, I endeavour only, by my enquiries, to know the real situation of the planets; that is, in other words, I endeavour to give them, in my conception, the same relations, that they bear towards each other in the heavens. To this operation of the mind, therefore, there seems to be always a real, though often an unknown standard, in the nature of things; nor is truth or (...)
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  10. The Sceptical Realism of David Hume.John P. Wright - 1983 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 47 (1):129-130.
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  11.  28
    John P. Portelli & Douglas J. Simpson.John P. Portelli - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
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  12.  13
    Machiavelli Against Republicanism.John P. McCormick - 2003 - Political Theory 31 (5):615-643.
    Scholars loosely affiliated with the “Cambridge School” accentuate rule of law, common good, class equilibrium, and non-domination in Machiavelli's political thought and republicanism generally but underestimate the Florentine's preference for class conflict and ignore his insistence on elite accountability. The author argues that they obscure the extent to which Machiavelli is an anti-elitist critic of the republican tradition, which they fail to disclose was predominantly oligarchic. The prescriptive lessons these scholars draw from republicanism for contemporary politics reinforce rather than reform (...)
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  13. Ideas Of Habit And Custom In Early Modern Philosophy.John P. Wright - 2011 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 42 (1):18-32.
  14.  5
    From Mathematics to Philosophy.John P. Burgess - 1977 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 42 (4):579-580.
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  15.  34
    Introduction: Open Questions in Roboethics.John P. Sullins - 2011 - Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):233-238.
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  16. Dr. George Cheyne, Chevalier Ramsay, and Hume's Letter to a Physician.John P. Wright - 2003 - Hume Studies 29 (1):125-141.
    The publication of a new intellectual biography of George Cheyne provides a "propitious" occasion for "a thoroughly skeptical review" of the question which has long exercised Hume scholars, whether Cheyne was the intended recipient of David Hume's fascinating pre-Treatise Letter to a Physician, the letter which describes his own hypochondriacal physical and mental symptoms and gives an account of his early philosophical development. Hume's nineteenth-century biographer, John Hill Burton, argued that Hume was probably writing to Cheyne, while Ernest Mossner (...)
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  17. Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment.John P. Wright & Paul Potter (eds.) - 2000 - Clarendon Press.
    Psyche and Soma is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the history of understanding of the human mind or soul and its relationship to the body, through the course of more than two thousand years. Thirteen specially commissioned chapters, each written by a recognized expert, discuss such figures as the doctors Hippocrates and Galen, the theologians St Paul, Augustine, and Aquinas, and philosophers from Plato to Leibniz.
     
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  18. Hume on the Origin of 'Modern Honour' : A Study in Hume's Philosophical Development.John P. Wright - 2012 - In Ruth Savage (ed.), Philosophy and Religion in Enlightenment Britain: New Case Studies. Oxford University Press.
  19. Hume's Causal Realism: Recovering a Traditional Interpretation.John P. Wright - 2000 - In Rupert J. Read & Kenneth A. Richman (eds.), The New Hume Debate. Routledge. pp. 88--99.
     
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  20. Metaphysics and Physiology: Mind, Body, and the Animal Economy in Eighteenth-Century Scotland.John P. Wright - 1990 - In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in the Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment. Clarendon Press. pp. 251-301.
  21.  35
    A Subject with No Object.Zoltan Gendler Szabo, John P. Burgess & Gideon Rosen - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (1):106.
    This is the first systematic survey of modern nominalistic reconstructions of mathematics, and for this reason alone it should be read by everyone interested in the philosophy of mathematics and, more generally, in questions concerning abstract entities. In the bulk of the book, the authors sketch a common formal framework for nominalistic reconstructions, outline three major strategies such reconstructions can follow, and locate proposals in the literature with respect to these strategies. The discussion is presented with admirable precision and clarity, (...)
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  22.  10
    Machiavelli's Political Trials and “The Free Way of Life”.John P. McCormick - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (4):385-411.
    This essay examines the political trials through which, according to Machiavelli's Discourses, republics should punish magistrates and prominent citizens who threaten or violate popular liberty. Unlike modern constitutions, which assign indictments and appeals to small numbers of government officials, Machiavelli's neo-Roman model encourages individual citizens to accuse corrupt or usurping elites and promotes the entire citizenry as political jury and court of appeal. Machiavellian political justice requires, on the one hand, equitable, legal procedures that serve all citizens by punishing guilty (...)
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  23.  32
    Custom and Habit in Physiology and the Science of Human Nature in the British Enlightenment.John P. Wright - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (2-3):183-207.
    In this paper I show how what came to be known as “the double law of habit,” first formulated by Joseph Butler in a discussion of moral psychology in 1736, was taken up and developed by medical physiologists William Porterfield, Robert Whytt, and William Cullen as they disputed fundamental questions regarding the influence of the mind on the body, the possibility of unconscious mental processes, and the nature and extent of voluntary action. The paper shows, on a particular topic, the (...)
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  24. The Understanding.John P. Wright - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 148-70.
    The article discusses the varying conceptions of the faculty of ‘the understanding’ in 18th-century British philosophy and logic. Topics include the distinction between the understanding and the will, the traditional division of three acts of understanding and its critics, the naturalizing of human understanding, conceiving of the limits of human understanding, British innatism and the critique of empiricist conceptions of the understanding, and reconceiving the understanding and the elimination of scepticism. Authors discussed include Richard Price, James Harris, Zachary Mayne, Edward (...)
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  25.  66
    Ethics and Artificial Life: From Modeling to Moral Agents. [REVIEW]John P. Sullins - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):139-148.
    Artificial Life has two goals. One attempts to describe fundamental qualities of living systems through agent based computer models. And the second studies whether or not we can artificially create living things in computational mediums that can be realized either, virtually in software, or through biotechnology. The study of ALife has recently branched into two further subdivisions, one is “dry” ALife, which is the study of living systems “in silico” through the use of computer simulations, and the other is “wet” (...)
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  26. Ideas of Custom and Habit in Early Modern Philosophy.John P. Wright - 2011 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 42 (1):18.
  27.  68
    Scepticism, Causal Science and 'The Old Hume'.John P. Wright - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (2):123-142.
    This paper replies to Peter Millican (Mind, 2009), who argues that Hume denies the possible existence of causal powers which underlie the regularities that we observe in nature. I argue that Hume's own philosophical views on causal power cannot be considered apart from his mitigated skepticism. His account of the origin of the idea of causal power, which traces it to a subjective impression, only leads to what he calls ‘Pyrrhonian scepticism’. He holds that we can only escape such excessive (...)
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  28. Hume Vs. Reid on Ideas: The New Hume Letter.John P. Wright - 1987 - Mind 96 (383):392-398.
    In the newly discovered letter Hume answers Reid's charge that he held a theory of ideas derived from his predecessors and criticizes Reid's own theory of innate ideas. He defends his own theory that ideas are derived from impressions. I discuss Reid's own puzzlement that in the first _Enquiry_ Hume ascribes a natural belief in necessary connections to the vulgar without an idea--and its influence on subsequent readings of Hume as a 'regularity theorist.' I argue that it was the 'Common (...)
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  29. A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics.John P. Burgess & Gideon Rosen - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Numbers and other mathematical objects are exceptional in having no locations in space or time or relations of cause and effect. This makes it difficult to account for the possibility of the knowledge of such objects, leading many philosophers to embrace nominalism, the doctrine that there are no such objects, and to embark on ambitious projects for interpreting mathematics so as to preserve the subject while eliminating its objects. This book cuts through a host of technicalities that have obscured previous (...)
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  30. Rigor and Structure.John P. Burgess - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    While we are commonly told that the distinctive method of mathematics is rigorous proof, and that the special topic of mathematics is abstract structure, there has been no agreement among mathematicians, logicians, or philosophers as to just what either of these assertions means. John P. Burgess clarifies the nature of mathematical rigor and of mathematical structure, and above all of the relation between the two, taking into account some of the latest developments in mathematics, including the rise of experimental (...)
     
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  31.  44
    Culture and Whistleblowing an Empirical Study of Croatian and United States Managers Utilizing Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions.A. Assad Tavakoli, John P. Keenan & B. Cranjak-Karanovic - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):49-64.
    Leaders and managers of today's multinational corporations face a plethora of problems and issues directly attributable to the fact that they are operating in an international context. With worksites, plants and/or customers based in another country, or even several countries, representing a vast spectrum of cultural differences, international trade and offshore operations, coupled with increased globalisation in respect to political, social and economic realities, contribute to new dilemmas that these leaders must deal with. Not the least of these being a (...)
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  32.  5
    Political Trials, Dictatorship, and War.John P. Mccormick, Andreas Kalyvas & Jill Frank - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (4):385-467.
    This essay examines the political trials through which, according to Machiavelli's Discourses, republics should punish magistrates and prominent citizens who threaten or violate popular liberty. Unlike modern constitutions, which assign indictments and appeals to small numbers of government officials, Machiavelli's neo-Roman model encourages individual citizens to accuse corrupt or usurping elites and promotes the entire citizenry as political jury and court of appeal. Machiavellian political justice requires, on the one hand, equitable, legal procedures that serve all citizens by punishing guilty (...)
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  33.  19
    Hume's Rejection of the Theory of Ideas.John P. Wright - 1991 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 8 (2):149 - 162.
  34.  16
    John Locke's Two Treatises of Government: New Interpretations.John P. Hittinger - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (3):615-617.
    The last thirty years has witnessed an explosion of scholarly books and articles on Locke which, claims Harpham, has "recast our most basic understanding of Locke as a historical actor and political theorist, the Two Treatises as a document, and liberalism as a coherent tradition of political discourse". The seven articles in this volume attempt to assess this "new scholarship," which is described as revisionist and historicist. This volume is now probably the best introduction to the "new scholarship." The introduction (...)
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  35. Hysteria and Mechanical Man.John P. Wright - 1980 - Journal of the History of Ideas 41 (2):233.
    In this article I contrast 17th and 18th explanations of hysteria including those of Sydenham and Willis with those given by Plato and pre-modern medicine. I show that beginning in the second decade of the 17th century the locus of the disorder was transferred to the nervous system and it was no longer connected with the womb as in Hippocrates and Galen; hysteria became identified with hypochondria, and was a disease contracted by men as well as women. I discuss the (...)
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  36.  54
    Fixing Frege.John P. Burgess - 2005 - Princeton University Press.
    This book surveys the assortment of methods put forth for fixing Frege's system, in an attempt to determine just how much of mathematics can be reconstructed in ...
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  37.  1
    When Null Hypothesis Significance Testing Is Unsuitable for Research: A Reassessment.Denes Szucs & John P. A. Ioannidis - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  38.  8
    John Locke.John P. Wright & Kathleen M. Squadrito - 1982 - Philosophical Review 91 (2):278.
  39. Philosophical Logic.John P. Burgess - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    Philosophical Logic is a clear and concise critical survey of nonclassical logics of philosophical interest written by one of the world's leading authorities on the subject. After giving an overview of classical logic, John Burgess introduces five central branches of nonclassical logic, focusing on the sometimes problematic relationship between formal apparatus and intuitive motivation. Requiring minimal background and arranged to make the more technical material optional, the book offers a choice between an overview and in-depth study, and it balances (...)
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  40.  22
    "Cajetan's Notion of Existence," by John P. Reilly.John P. Doyle - 1973 - Modern Schoolman 51 (1):73-74.
  41.  24
    A 'Great Man' Approach: A Book Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW]John P. Ferre - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):55 – 56.
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  42. Book Review: Toward a History of Journalism Ethics: An Essay Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW]John P. Ferre - 1991 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 6 (3):182 – 187.
     
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  43.  14
    Book Review: The American View: A Book Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW]John P. Ferre - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (3):196 – 198.
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  44.  16
    The American View: A Book Review by John P. Ferre. [REVIEW]John P. Ferre - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (3):196-198.
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  45.  16
    Thinking at the Limits: Jacques Derrida and Jean-Luc Marion in Dialogue with Richard Kearney.John P. Manoussakis - 2004 - Philosophy Today 48 (1):3-3.
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  46.  14
    Continuous Processing in Word Recognition at 24 Months.Daniel Swingley, John P. Pinto & Anne Fernald - 1999 - Cognition 71 (2):73-108.
  47.  6
    Review of John Locke by Kathleen Squadrito.John P. Wright - 1982 - Philosophical Review 91 (2):278.
  48.  74
    Reviving Material Theories of Induction.John P. McCaskey - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 83:1–7.
    John Norton says that philosophers have been led astray for thousands of years by their attempt to treat induction formally. He is correct that such an attempt has caused no end of trouble, but he is wrong about the history. There is a rich tradition of non-formal induction. In fact, material theories of induction prevailed all through antiquity and from the Renaissance to the mid-1800s. Recovering these past systems would not only fill lacunae in Norton’s own theory but would (...)
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  49.  29
    Machiavellian Democracy.John P. McCormick (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: class, liberty, and popular government; Part I: 2. Peoples, patricians, and the prince; 3. Democratic republics and the oppressive appetite of young nobles; Part II: 4. The benefits and limits of popular participation and judgment; 5. Elections, lotteries and class specific institutions; 6. Political trials and 'the free way of life'; Part III: 7. Republicanism and democracy; 8. Post-electoral republics and the people's tribunate revived.
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  50. Substance Versus Function Dualism in Eighteenth-Century Medicine.John P. Wright - 2002 - In John P. Wright & Paul Potter (eds.), Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment. Clarendon Press.
     
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