8 found
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  1.  21
    Non‐Bayesian Noun Generalization in 3‐ to 5‐Year‐Old Children: Probing the Role of Prior Knowledge in the Suspicious Coincidence Effect. [REVIEW]Gavin W. Jenkins, Larissa K. Samuelson, Jodi R. Smith & John P. Spencer - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (2):268-306.
    It is unclear how children learn labels for multiple overlapping categories such as “Labrador,” “dog,” and “animal.” Xu and Tenenbaum suggested that learners infer correct meanings with the help of Bayesian inference. They instantiated these claims in a Bayesian model, which they tested with preschoolers and adults. Here, we report data testing a developmental prediction of the Bayesian model—that more knowledge should lead to narrower category inferences when presented with multiple subordinate exemplars. Two experiments did not support this prediction. Children (...)
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  2.  7
    Prototypes and Particulars: Geometric and Experience-Dependent Spatial Categories.John P. Spencer & Alycia M. Hund - 2002 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (1):16-37.
  3.  44
    Autonomy in Action: Linking the Act of Looking to Memory Formation in Infancy Via Dynamic Neural Fields.Sammy Perone & John P. Spencer - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (1):1-60.
    Looking is a fundamental exploratory behavior by which infants acquire knowledge about the world. In theories of infant habituation, however, looking as an exploratory behavior has been deemphasized relative to the reliable nature with which looking indexes active cognitive processing. We present a new theory that connects looking to the dynamics of memory formation and formally implement this theory in a Dynamic Neural Field model that learns autonomously as it actively looks and looks away from a stimulus. We situate this (...)
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  4.  7
    The Role of Experience in Location Estimation: Target Distributions Shift Location Memory Biases.John Lipinski, Vanessa R. Simmering, Jeffrey S. Johnson & John P. Spencer - 2010 - Cognition 115 (1):147-153.
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  5.  16
    Come Down From the Clouds: Grounding Bayesian Insights in Developmental and Behavioral Processes.Gavin W. Jenkins, Larissa K. Samuelson & John P. Spencer - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):204-206.
    According to Jones & Love (J&L), Bayesian theories are too often isolated from other theories and behavioral processes. Here, we highlight examples of two types of isolation from the field of word learning. Specifically, Bayesian theories ignore emergence, critical to development theory, and have not probed the behavioral details of several key phenomena, such as the effect.
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  6.  48
    Grounding Cognitive‐Level Processes in Behavior: The View From Dynamic Systems Theory.Larissa K. Samuelson, Gavin W. Jenkins & John P. Spencer - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (2):191-205.
    Marr's seminal work laid out a program of research by specifying key questions for cognitive science at different levels of analysis. Because dynamic systems theory focuses on time and interdependence of components, DST research programs come to very different conclusions regarding the nature of cognitive change. We review a specific DST approach to cognitive-level processes: dynamic field theory. We review research applying DFT to several cognitive-level processes: object permanence, naming hierarchical categories, and inferring intent, that demonstrate the difference in understanding (...)
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  7.  26
    The Essence of Cognitive Development.John P. Spencer - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):62-63.
    Psychologists have long debated the underlying cause of infants' perseverative reaching. Thelen et al. explain the error in terms of general processes that make goal-directed actions to remembered locations. The context- and experience-dependent nature of their model implies that there is no single cause of the A-not-B error, and, more generally, no core essence to cognitive development.
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  8. Moving Word Learning to a Novel Space: A Dynamic Systems View of Referent Selection and Retention.Larissa K. Samuelson, Sarah C. Kucker & John P. Spencer - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41:52-72.
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