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John P. Sullins [14]John Paul Sullins [2]
  1. When is a robot a moral agent.John P. Sullins - 2006 - International Review of Information Ethics 6 (12):23-30.
    In this paper Sullins argues that in certain circumstances robots can be seen as real moral agents. A distinction is made between persons and moral agents such that, it is not necessary for a robot to have personhood in order to be a moral agent. I detail three requirements for a robot to be seen as a moral agent. The first is achieved when the robot is significantly autonomous from any programmers or operators of the machine. The second is when (...)
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  2.  56
    Introduction: Open Questions in Roboethics.John P. Sullins - 2011 - Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):233-238.
    Roboethics is the recent offshoot of computer ethics that pays special attention to the alterations that need to be made to computer ethics when we give the computer mobility and a means to interact directly in the human environment. The closely related field of machine morality explores how ethical systems and behaviors may be programmed into social robotics applications. As robots move from the factory floor into our homes and work lives, they stand to change key aspects of the way (...)
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  3. An Evaluation Schema for the Ethical Use of Autonomous Robotic Systems in Security Applications.Markus Christen, Thomas Burri, Joseph O. Chapa, Raphael Salvi, Filippo Santoni de Sio & John P. Sullins - 2017 - University of Zurich Digital Society Initiative White Paper Series, No. 1.
    We propose a multi-step evaluation schema designed to help procurement agencies and others to examine the ethical dimensions of autonomous systems to be applied in the security sector, including autonomous weapons systems.
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  4. Mark A. Bedau and Emily C. Parke : The Ethics of Protocells: Moral and Social Implications of Creating Life in the Laboratory : MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2009, 365 pp, ISBN 978-0-262-01262-1, ISBN 978-0-262-51269-5.John P. Sullins - 2012 - Acta Biotheoretica 60 (3):329-332.
    A review with commentary on Mark A. Bedau and Emily C. Parke (eds): The Ethics of Protocells: Moral and Social Implications of Creating Life in the Laboratory (Basic Bioethics series) MIT Press, Cambridge,MA, 2009, 365 pp, ISBN 978-0-262-01262-1, ISBN 978-0-262-51269-5.
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  5.  53
    The Great Philoosphical Objections to AI: The History and Legacy of the AI Wars.Eric Dietrich, Chris Fields, John P. Sullins, Van Heuveln Bram & Robin Zebrowski - 2021 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book surveys and examines the most famous philosophical arguments against building a machine with human-level intelligence. From claims and counter-claims about the ability to implement consciousness, rationality, and meaning, to arguments about cognitive architecture, the book presents a vivid history of the clash between the philosophy and AI. Tellingly, the AI Wars are mostly quiet now. Explaining this crucial fact opens new paths to understanding the current resurgence AI (especially, deep learning AI and robotics), what happens when philosophy meets (...)
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  6.  43
    Building simple mechanical minds: Using lego robots for research and teaching in philosophy.John P. Sullins - 2002 - In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: the intersection of philosophy and computing. Malden, MA: Blackwell. pp. 110-122.
    Introduces the use of Lego Robots for use in research and teaching in philosophy. Potential uses include using the machines as pedagogical tools for teaching introductory ideas in cognitive robotics, philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of Artificial Intelligence. Describes the strength and potential pitfalls of introducing this technology to the classroom.
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  7.  15
    Building Simple Mechanical MindsUsing LEGO® Robots for Research and Teaching in Philosophy.John P. Sullins - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 33 (1‐2):110-122.
    In this essay I discuss how I built a cognitive‐robotics lab using inexpensive LEGO® MINDSTORMS™ robot kits. The lab has provided pedagogical and research opportunities for a number of philosophy courses, and I briefly describe the results of those efforts. I also describe how one might build a similar lab. Philosophers need to be more directly involved in the field of robotics. There is much work to do in tidying up the philosophical debris left by the last wave of robotics (...)
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  8.  42
    Drones in the crosshairs.John P. Sullins - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 63:118-120.
    Book review of "Killing by remote Control," Bradley Jay Strawser (Ed), Oxford university Press.
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  9.  9
    Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorems and Artificial Life.John P. Sullins - 1997 - Society for Philosophy and Technology Quarterly Electronic Journal 2 (3):185-195.
    In this paper I discuss whether Gödel's incompleteness theorems have any implications for studies in Artificial Life (AL). Since Gödel's incompleteness theorems have been used to argue against certain mechanistic theories of the mind, it seems natural to attempt to apply the theorems to certain strong mechanistic arguments postulated by some AL theorists. -/- We find that an argument using the incompleteness theorems can not be constructed that will block the hard AL claim, specifically in the field of robotics. However, (...)
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  10.  36
    Understanding Beliefs, by Nils J. Nilsson.John P. Sullins - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):103-106.
    A review with commentary on the book, Understanding Beliefs, Nils J. Nilsson, MIT Press, 2014.
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  11. Robowarfare: Can robots be more ethical than humans on the battlefield? [REVIEW]John P. Sullins - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (3):263-275.
    Telerobotically operated and semiautonomous machines have become a major component in the arsenals of industrial nations around the world. By the year 2015 the United States military plans to have one-third of their combat aircraft and ground vehicles robotically controlled. Although there are many reasons for the use of robots on the battlefield, perhaps one of the most interesting assertions are that these machines, if properly designed and used, will result in a more just and ethical implementation of warfare. This (...)
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  12.  88
    Ethics and artificial life: From modeling to moral agents. [REVIEW]John P. Sullins - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):139-148.
    Artificial Life has two goals. One attempts to describe fundamental qualities of living systems through agent based computer models. And the second studies whether or not we can artificially create living things in computational mediums that can be realized either, virtually in software, or through biotechnology. The study of ALife has recently branched into two further subdivisions, one is “dry” ALife, which is the study of living systems “in silico” through the use of computer simulations, and the other is “wet” (...)
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  13.  72
    Drones in the crosshairs. [REVIEW]John P. Sullins - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 63:118-120.
    A review and commentary on Killing By Remote Control: the Ethics of an Unmanned Military, edited by Bradley Jay Strawser (forward by Jeff McMahan), (Oxford University Press). -/- .
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  14.  54
    Silicone carnage. [REVIEW]John P. Sullins - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):120-121.
    Book review of "“P. W. Singer, Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century," Penguin books.
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