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  1.  60
    Intra-Organizational Volunteerism: Good Soldiers, Good Deeds and Good Politics.John Peloza & Derek N. Hassay - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (4):357-379.
    Despite the millions of hours donated to charity each year by employees on behalf of their employers there has been relatively little research into the motives for such pro-social behavior. The current paper extends Peterson’s (2004, Journal of Business Ethics 49, 371) study by exploring a unique form of employee volunteerism identified as intra-organizational, or employer-sanctioned volunteerism, and uniting the heretofore distinct charity support and organizational citizenship behavior literatures. Results of a preliminary study revealed that employee participation in such intra-organizational (...)
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  2.  61
    The Marketing of Employee Volunteerism.John Peloza, Simon Hudson & Derek N. Hassay - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):371 - 386.
    Employee volunteerism can be an effective strategy for increasing the effectiveness of corporate philanthropy. However, in order to be effective, volunteer initiatives should be directed by the firm to ensure a strategic fit and focus on the core competencies of the firm. Therefore, internal marketing strategies are needed to ensure managers receive employee support. Our research quantitatively extends research by Peloza and Hassay {journal of Business Ethics 64(4), 357-379, 2006) who argued that employee volunteerism is motivated by egoistic, altruistic and (...)
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  3.  8
    Beyond Warm Glow: The Risk-Mitigating Effect of Corporate Social Responsibility.Abhi Bhattacharya, Valerie Good, Hanieh Sardashti & John Peloza - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (2):317-336.
    Corporate social responsibility positively impacts relationships between firms and customers. Previous research construes this as an outcome of customers’ warm glow that results from supporting firms’ benevolence. The current research demonstrates that beyond warm glow, CSR positively impacts firms’ sales through mitigating their customers’ perceptions of purchase risk. We demonstrate this effect across three conditions in which customers’ perceived risk of purchase is heightened, using both secondary data and two lab experiments. Under conditions of greater purchase risk, CSR positively impacts (...)
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  4.  30
    Can “Real” Men Consume Ethically? How Ethical Consumption Leads to Unintended Observer Inference.Jingzhi Shang & John Peloza - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (1):129-145.
    Consumers often intend to create a socially responsible identity by consuming ethically. Observers, however, do not limit their inferences to the specific identity consumers intend to project. To illustrate, we examine how observers make inferences about consumers on the basis of their ethical consumption. Across four studies we find that, in addition to being viewed as ethical, consumers are viewed as less masculine and more feminine when they consume ethical products. We also identify two boundary conditions to this effect, including (...)
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  5.  59
    Meet the Parents: A Parents’ Perspective on Product Placement in Children’s Films. [REVIEW]Simon Hudson, David Hudson & John Peloza - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):289 - 304.
    The ethics of advertising to children has been identified as one of the most important topics worthy of academic research in the marketing field. A fast growing advertising technique is product placement, and its use in children's films is becoming more and more common. The limited evidence existing suggests that product placements are especially potent in their effects upon children. Yet regulations regarding placements targeted at children are virtually non-existent, with advertising guidelines suggesting that it remains the prime responsibility of (...)
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  6.  6
    Meet the Parents: A Parents’ Perspective on Product Placement in Children’s Films.Simon Hudson, David Hudson & John Peloza - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):289-304.
    The ethics of advertising to children has been identified as one of the most important topics worthy of academic research in the marketing field. A fast growing advertising technique is product placement, and its use in children's films is becoming more and more common. The limited evidence existing suggests that product placements are especially potent in their effects upon children. Yet regulations regarding placements targeted at children are virtually non-existent, with advertising guidelines suggesting that it remains the prime responsibility of (...)
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  7.  9
    JSTOR: Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 80, No. 2 (Jun., 2008), Pp. 289-304.Simon Hudson, David Hudson & John Peloza - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):289-304.
    The ethics of advertising to children has been identified as one of the most important topics worthy of academic research in the marketing field. A fast growing advertising technique is product placement, and its use in children's films is becoming more and more common. The limited evidence existing suggests that product placements are especially potent in their effects upon children. Yet regulations regarding placements targeted at children are virtually non-existent, with advertising guidelines suggesting that it remains the prime responsibility of (...)
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  8.  23
    Giving the Gift of Goodness: An Exploration of Socially Responsible Gift-Giving.Todd Green, Julie Tinson & John Peloza - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):29-44.
    Previous research demonstrates that consumers support firms’ CSR activities, and increasingly demand socially responsible products and services. However, an implicit assumption in the extant literature is that the purchaser and the consumer of the product are the same person. The current research focuses on a unique form of socially responsible consumption behavior: gift-giving. Through 30 depth consumer interviews, we develop a typology of consumers based on whether consumers integrate CSR-related information into purchases, and whether the purchases are for themselves or (...)
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  9.  25
    The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility in Consumer Evaluation of Nutrition Information Disclosure by Retail Restaurants.Christine Ye, J. Joseph Cronin & John Peloza - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):313-326.
    Research examining consumer responses to the provision of nutritional information as part of restaurant menus has produced mixed results. In light of pending legislation requiring the provision of nutritional information, the authors examine the how corporate social responsibility impacts consumer service evaluation of restaurants. Findings from three studies demonstrate that the relationship between consumer attitudes toward the disclosure of nutrition information and their subsequent evaluation of the food provider is impacted by CSR-related initiatives. Studies one and two find that consumer (...)
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  10.  59
    Social Impact as a Measure of Fit Between Firm Activities and Stakeholder Expectations.Lisa Papania, Daniel M. Shapiro & John Peloza - 2008 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (1):3.
    Institutional investors are increasingly focusing on firms that prioritise Corporate Social Responsibility. In the absence of any objective measure of a firm's CSR Performance, their investment choices are largely guided by independent rating indices that rank firms according to their social performance metrics. As a result, firms looking to increase their attractiveness as targets of social investment focus their CSR efforts on increasing the visibility of activities that are recognised by such indices. However, the validity of these indices as accurate (...)
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