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John R. Bowlin [10]John Rennell Bowlin [1]
  1.  15
    Democracy, Tolerance, Aquinas.John R. Bowlin - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (2):278-299.
    Democracy is more than a collection of institutions, laws, and freely contested sources of authority. It is also an ideal. If we think of this ideal in republican terms, in terms of resistance to domination through the practices of mutual accountability, and if we recall that democratic life invariably comes with loss, then those of us who inhabit a democratic political society will need to locate, and then cultivate, responses to loss that do not undermine our commitment to this ideal. (...)
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  2.  7
    Tolerance Among the Fathers.John R. Bowlin - 2006 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 26 (1):3-36.
    HOPING TO ADVANCE OUR UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT TOLERANCE INvolves and unsettling our assumptions about its history, in this essay I take a backward glance at some of the discourse about the virtue that emerged among the first Christian apologists in the debates they carried on with their pagan critics. Along the way, several conclusions come into view: that tolerance regards the objectionable differences of those with whom we share some sort of society, that the question of social membership always precedes (...)
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  3. Augustine on Justifying Coercion.John R. Bowlin - 1997 - The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics 17:49-70.
    Augustine encouraged Christian bishops and magistrates to coerce and constrain religious dissenters, he participated in these activities almost from the start of his career as presbyter under Valerius, and he offered justifications for what he did. Robert Markus and John Milbank consider Augustine's justifications inconsistent with the aspect of his social thought each admires most. Their conclusions are unwarranted and unnecessary. Augustine's justifications are neither inconsistent with the rest of his social thought, nor dependent upon judgments about just and unjust (...)
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  4.  94
    Book Review: Matthew Levering, Biblical Natural Law: A Theocentric and Teleological Approach (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008). Vii + 260 Pp. 55 (Hb), ISBN 978-0-19-953529-. [REVIEW]John R. Bowlin - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (3):338-340.
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  5. Comment [on Mathewes 2000].John R. Bowlin - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28:473-77.
     
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  6.  6
    Letters, Notes, and Comments.John R. Bowlin & Charles T. Mathewes - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):473 - 481.
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  7. Nature, Grace, and Toleration.John R. Bowlin - 2001 - The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics 21:85-104.
    Various theological benefits accrue as similarities are noted between Christian churches and other intermediate associations in societies like ours. Above all, we come to regard the church in ancient ways, as a twinned body, as a gemina persona, one thing by nature, another by grace. This in turn helps us see the morally ambiguous character of graced nature, even ecclesiastical nature, exemplified most plainly in the mixture of virtue and vice that natural societies yield, but also in the church's ambivalence (...)
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  8.  44
    Psychology and Theodicy in Aquinas.John R. Bowlin - 1998 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 7 (2):129-156.
    Throughout much of this century the most prominent exegetes maintained that Aquinass causal authority and the composition of the list of later works did little to unsettle their shared conviction that Aristotles insistence that the will can move itself, at least in some fashion, apart from the influence of the intellect. 1.
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  9.  26
    Comment by John R. Bowlin.John R. Bowlin - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):473-477.
    Comments on:Charles T. Mathewes, Agency, Nature, Transcendence, and Moralism: A Review of Recent Work in Moral Psychology.
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  10.  56
    Sieges, Shipwrecks, and Sensible Knaves: Justice and Utility in Butler and Hume.John R. Bowlin - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):253 - 280.
    By examining the theories of justice developed by Joseph Butler and David Hume, the author discloses the conceptual limits of their moral naturalism. Butler was unable to accommodate the possibility that justice is, at least to some extent, a social convention. Hume, who more presciently tried to spell out the conventional character of justice, was unable to carry through that project within the framework of his moral naturalism. These limits have gone unnoticed, largely because Butler and Hume have been misinterpreted, (...)
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