Results for 'John S. Brady'

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  1.  72
    No Contest? Assessing the Agonistic Critiques of Jürgen Habermas’s Theory of the Public Sphere.John S. Brady - 2004 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (3):331-354.
    Would democratic theory in its empirical and normative guises be in a better position without the theory of the deliberative public sphere? In this paper I explore recent theories of agonistic democracy that have answered this question in the affirmative. I question their assertionthat the theory of the public sphere should be abandoned in favor of a model of democratic politics based on political contestation. Furthermore, I explore one of the fundamental assumptionsat work in the debate about the theory of (...)
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  2.  10
    Incorrigible Beliefs and Democratic Deliberation: A Critique of Stanley Fish.John S. Brady - 2006 - Constellations 13 (3):374-393.
  3.  29
    Emotional Insight by Michael S. Brady[REVIEW]John M. Monteleone - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 13:1-5.
    This review considers Michael Brady's account of the positive epistemic role of emotions. Brady claims that emotions can facilitate evaluative understanding because they "capture and consume" a person's attention. This review claims that there is a difference between emotions that are intrinsically productive of evaluative understanding and those are productive of evaluative understanding only because of the contribution of other, non-emotional states. Accordingly, Brady has not yet established that emotions fall in the former category, rather than the (...)
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  4.  34
    John Muir's Environmental Aesthetics: Interweaving the Aesthetic, Religious, and Scientific.Emily Brady - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):463-472.
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  5.  84
    A Conceptualist Reply to Hanna’s Kantian Non-Conceptualism.Brady Bowman - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):417 - 446.
    Hanna proposes a version of non-conceptualism he closely associates with Kant. This paper takes issue with his proposal on two fronts. First, there are reasons to dispute whether any version of non-conceptualism can be rightly attributed to Kant. In addition to pointing out passages that conflict with Hanna's interpretation, I also suggest ways in which the Kant of the Opus Postumum could integrate key insights of non-conceptualism into a basically conceptualist framework. In Part Two of the paper, I turn to (...)
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  6.  37
    John Le Carre’s Smiley Saga.Charles A. Brady - 1985 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 60 (3):275-296.
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  7.  73
    The Blondelian Synthesis. By John J. McNeill, S.J.Jules M. Brady - 1970 - Modern Schoolman 47 (2):251-254.
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  8.  10
    The Nature of Virtue in a Politics of Consent: John Locke on Education.Michelle E. Brady - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2):157-173.
    John Locke’s Some Thoughts Concerning Education emphasizes the need to develop the habit of rationally judging which desires should be fulfilled. While nurture plays an essential role in this development, nature provides the fundamental desire for self-preservation, the end in light of which reason makes its judgments. The significance of this natural element in Lockean virtue has generally been overlooked, but it becomes clear through a comparison to Aristotelian virtue. Locke rejects any virtue that would require changing our most (...)
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  9.  30
    The Nature of Virtue in a Politics of Consent.Michelle E. Brady - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2):157-173.
    John Locke’s Some Thoughts Concerning Education emphasizes the need to develop the habit of rationally judging which desires should be fulfilled. While nurture plays an essential role in this development, nature provides the fundamental desire for self-preservation, the end in light of which reason makes its judgments. The significance of this natural element in Lockean virtue has generally been overlooked, but it becomes clear through a comparison to Aristotelian virtue. Locke rejects any virtue that would require changing our most (...)
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  10. I Watch, Therefore I Am: From Socrates to Sartre, the Great Mysteries of Life as Explained Through Howdy Doody, Marcia Brady, Homer Simpson, Don Draper, and Other Tv Icons.Gregory Bergman - 2011 - Adams Media.
    What's the world made of? Donuts! and Beer! -- Protagoras, Gorgias, Captain Kirk, and Denny Crane -- Socrates : The Sergeant Schultz of Ancient Greece -- Plato is the new American Idol -- Aristotle loves Lucy -- Charlie Harper's Non-Epicurean lifestyle -- St. Augustine's Highway to Heaven -- Scully shaves Mulder with Ockham's Razor -- Larry Hagman dreams of Descartes -- Locke versus Hobbes, or The Brady Bunch takes on Survivor -- Can or can't Kant like vampires? -- Reading (...)
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  11.  37
    Attention, Emotion, and Evaluative Understanding.John Monteleone - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1749-1764.
    This paper assesses Michael Brady’s claim that the ‘capture and consumption of attention’ in an emotion facilitates evaluative understanding. It argues that emotional attention is epistemically deleterious on its own, even though it can be beneficial in conjunction with the right epistemic skills and motivations. The paper considers Sartre’s and Solomon’s claim that emotions have purposes, respectively, to circumvent difficulty or maximize self-esteem. While this appeal to purposes is problematic, it suggests a promising alternative conception of how emotions can (...)
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  12.  4
    Independent Storage of Different Features of Real-World Objects in Long-Term Memory.Igor S. Utochkin & Timothy F. Brady - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
  13.  26
    Bridging the Gulf Between Management Practice and Ethical TheoryEthical Managing: Rules and Results.John R. Boatright & F. Neil Brady - 1991 - Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (4):449.
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  14.  81
    Emotional Insight: The Epistemic Role of Emotional Experience.Michael S. Brady - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael S. Brady offers a new account of the role of emotions in our lives. He argues that emotional experiences do not give us information in the same way that perceptual experiences do. Instead, they serve our epistemic needs by capturing our attention and facilitating a reappraisal of the evaluative information that emotions themselves provide.
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  15.  11
    Michael S. Brady. Emotional Insight: The Epistemic Role of Emotional Experience. Reviewed By.Fabrice Bothereau - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (2):54-57.
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  16. The Ugly Truth: Negative Aesthetics and Environment: Emily Brady.Emily Brady - 2011 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:83-99.
    In autumn 2009, BBC television ran a natural history series, ‘Last Chance to See’, with Stephen Fry and wildlife writer and photographer, Mark Carwardine, searching out endangered species. In one episode they retraced the steps Carwardine had taken in the 1980s with Douglas Adams, when they visited Madagascar in search of the aye-aye, a nocturnal lemur. Fry and Carwardine visited an aye-aye in captivity, and upon first setting eyes on the creature they found it rather ugly. After spending an hour (...)
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  17.  46
    Suffering and Virtue.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Suffering, in one form or another, is present in all of our lives. But why do we suffer? On one reading, this is a question about the causes of physical and emotional suffering. But on another, it is a question about whether suffering has a point or purpose or value. In this ground-breaking book, Michael Brady argues that suffering is vital for the development of virtue, and hence for us to live happy or flourishing lives. After presenting a distinctive (...)
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  18.  40
    Emotion: The Basics.Michael Brady - 2018 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    While human beings might be rational animals, they are emotional animals as well. Emotions play a central role in all areas of our lives and if we are to have a proper understanding of human life and activity, we ought to have a good grasp of the emotions. Michael S. Brady structures Emotion: The Basics around two basic, yet fundamental, questions: What are emotions? And what do emotions do? In answering these questions Brady provides insight into a core (...)
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  19. The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature.Emily Brady - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    In The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature, Emily Brady takes a fresh look at the sublime and shows why it endures as a meaningful concept in contemporary philosophy. In a reassessment of historical approaches, the first part of the book identifies the scope and value of the sublime in eighteenth-century philosophy, nineteenth-century philosophy and Romanticism, and early wilderness aesthetics. The second part examines the sublime's contemporary significance through its relationship to the arts; its position with respect (...)
     
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  20. Philosophically Speaking, How Many Species Concepts Are There?John S. Wilkins - 2011 - Zootaxa 2765:58–60.
  21. Essentialism in Biology.John S. Wilkins - manuscript
    Essentialism in philosophy is the position that things, especially kinds of things, have essences, or sets of properties, that all members of the kind must have, and the combination of which only members of the kind do, in fact, have. It is usually thought to derive from classical Greek philosophy and in particular from Aristotle’s notion of “what it is to be” something. In biology, it has been claimed that pre-evolutionary views of living kinds, or as they are sometimes called, (...)
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  22.  14
    An Ideological Asymmetry in the Diffusion of Moralized Content on Social Media Among Political Leaders.William J. Brady, Julian A. Wills, Dominic Burkart, John T. Jost & Jay J. Van Bavel - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (10):1802-1813.
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  23.  66
    Emotional Insight, by Michael S. Brady: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, Pp. X + 204, £30.Hagit Benbaji - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):173-175.
  24.  9
    Emotional Insight, by Michael S. Brady: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, Pp. X + 204, £30. [REVIEW]Hagit Benbaji - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):173-175.
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  25.  14
    Knowledge and Groups: Michael S. Brady and Miranda Fricker : The Epistemic Life of Groups: Essays in the Epistemology of Collectives. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2016, $74.00 HB.Chris Dragos - 2017 - Metascience 26 (2):215-218.
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  26. Deliberative Global Politics: Discourse and Democracy in a Divided World.John S. Dryzek - 2006 - Polity.
    Contending discourses underlie many of the worlds most intractable conflicts, producing misery and violence. This is especially true in the post-9/11 world. However, contending discourses can also open the way to greater dialogue in global civil society and across states and international organizations. This possibility holds even for the most murderous sorts of conflicts in deeply divided societies. In this timely and original book, John Dryzek examines major contemporary conflicts in terms of clashing discourses. Topics covered include the alleged (...)
     
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  27. Discursive Democracy Politics, Policy, and Political Science.John S. Dryzek - 1990
     
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  28. Evolutionary Debunking Arguments in Three Domains: Fact, Value, and Religion.S. Wilkins John & E. Griffiths Paul - 2012 - In James Maclaurin Greg Dawes (ed.), A New Science of Religion. Routledge.
    Ever since Darwin people have worried about the sceptical implications of evolution. If our minds are products of evolution like those of other animals, why suppose that the beliefs they produce are true, rather than merely useful? We consider this problem for beliefs in three different domains: religion, morality, and commonsense and scientific claims about matters of empirical fact. We identify replies to evolutionary scepticism that work in some domains but not in others. One reply is that evolution can be (...)
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  29. The Irrationality of Recalcitrant Emotions.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
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  30.  37
    The Forum, the System, and the Polity: Three Varieties of Democratic Theory.John S. Dryzek - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (5):610-636.
    The theory of deliberative democracy is here furthered in terms of three images that locate its essence in respectively a single forum, a deliberative system, and an encompassing polity featuring particular integrative norms. The first two are ubiquitous, though contested, the third is stated here. Deliberative theorists need to contemplate how practices that make sense in each image connect to the other two. Forums only make sense when linked in a system that can synthesize very different deliberative virtues. Any system’s (...)
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  31.  34
    Risk, Contractualism, and Rose's "Prevention Paradox".S. D. John - 2014 - Social Theory and Practice 40 (1):28-50.
    Geoffrey Rose’s prevention paradox points to a tension between two prima facie plausible moral principles: that we should save the greater number and that weshould save the most at risk. This paper argues that a novel moral theory, ex-ante contractualism, captures our intuitions in many prevention paradox cases, regardless of our interpretation of probability claims. However, it goes on to show that it might be impossible to square ex-ante contractualism with all of our moral intuitions. It concludes that even if (...)
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  32.  21
    The Uncertainty Principle in Psychology.John S. Stamm - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):553-554.
  33.  13
    Principles of Economics.John S. Mackenzie - 1891 - Mind 16 (61):110-113.
  34. Curiosity and the Value of Truth.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford University Press. pp. 265-284.
    This chapter focuses on the question of whether true belief can have final value because it answers our ‘intellectual interest’ or ‘natural curiosity’. The idea is that sometimes we are interested in the truth on some issue not for any ulterior purpose, but simply because we are curious about that issue. It is argued that this approach fails to provide an adequate explanation of the final value of true belief, since there is an unbridgeable gap between our valuing the truth (...)
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  35.  70
    Painfulness, Desire, and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):239-250.
    The traditional desire view of painfulness maintains that pain sensations are painful because the subject desires that they not be occurring. A significant criticism of this view is that it apparently succumbs to a version of the Euthyphro Dilemma: the desire view, it is argued, is committed to an implausible answer to the question of why pain sensations are painful. In this paper, I explain and defend a new desire view, and one which can avoid the Euthyphro Dilemma. This new (...)
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  36. On the Ternary Relation and Conditionality.Jc Beall, Ross T. Brady, J. Michael Dunn, A. P. Hazen, Edwin D. Mares, Robert K. Meyer, Graham Priest, Greg Restall, David Ripley, John Slaney & Richard Sylvan - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (3):595 - 612.
    One of the most dominant approaches to semantics for relevant (and many paraconsistent) logics is the Routley-Meyer semantics involving a ternary relation on points. To some (many?), this ternary relation has seemed like a technical trick devoid of an intuitively appealing philosophical story that connects it up with conditionality in general. In this paper, we respond to this worry by providing three different philosophical accounts of the ternary relation that correspond to three conceptions of conditionality. We close by briefly discussing (...)
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  37. African Religions & Philosophy.John S. Mbiti - 1969 - Heinemann.
    Religion is approached from an African point of view but is as accessible to readers who belong to non-African societies as it is to those who have grown up in ...
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  38. How to Be a Chaste Species Pluralist-Realist: The Origins of Species Modes and the Synapomorphic Species Concept.John S. Wilkins - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (5):621-638.
    The biological species (biospecies) concept applies only to sexually reproducing species, which means that until sexual reproduction evolved, there were no biospecies. On the universal tree of life, biospecies concepts therefore apply only to a relatively small number of clades, notably plants andanimals. I argue that it is useful to treat the various ways of being a species (species modes) as traits of clades. By extension from biospecies to the other concepts intended to capture the natural realities of what keeps (...)
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  39. Biological Essentialism and the Tidal Change of Natural Kinds.John S. Wilkins - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (2):221-240.
    The vision of natural kinds that is most common in the modern philosophy of biology, particularly with respect to the question whether species and other taxa are natural kinds, is based on a revision of the notion by Mill in A System of Logic. However, there was another conception that Whewell had previously captured well, which taxonomists have always employed, of kinds as being types that need not have necessary and sufficient characters and properties, or essences. These competing views employ (...)
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  40.  19
    Risk, Contractualism, and Rose's.S. D. John - 2014 - Social Theory and Practice 40 (1):28-50.
  41. Could God Create Darwinian Accidents?John S. Wilkins - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):30-42.
    Abstract Charles Darwin, in his discussions with Asa Gray and in his published works, doubted whether God could so arrange it that exactly the desired contingent events would occur to cause particular outcomes by natural selection. In this paper, I argue that even a limited or neo-Leibnizian deity could have chosen a world that satisfied some arbitrary set of goals or functions in its outcomes and thus answer Darwin's conundrum. In more general terms, this supports the consistency of natural selection (...)
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  42. Foundations and Frontiers of Deliberative Governance.John S. Dryzek - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Deliberative democracy puts communication and talk at the centre of democracy. Foundations and Frontiers of Deliberative Governance takes a fresh look at the foundations of the field, and develops new applications in areas ranging from citizen participation to the democratization of authoritarian states to the global system.
     
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  43. The Epistemic Life of Groups: Essays in the Epistemology of Collectives.Michael S. Brady & Miranda Fricker (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Groups engage in epistemic activity all the time--whether it be the active collective inquiry of scientific research groups or crime detection units, or the evidential deliberations of tribunals and juries, or the informational efforts of the voting population in general--and yet in philosophy there is still relatively little epistemology of groups to help explore these epistemic practices and their various dimensions of social and philosophical significance. The aim of this book is to address this lack, by presenting original essays in (...)
     
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  44.  55
    Emotional Insight: The Epistemic Role of Emotional Experience, by Michael S. Brady[REVIEW]Carolyn Price - 2015 - Mind 124 (496):1240-1244.
    A review of Michael Brady's book Emotional Insight.
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  45. Virtue, Emotion, and Attention.Michael S. Brady - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
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  46. What is a Species? Essences and Generation.John S. Wilkins - 2010 - Theory in Biosciences 129:141-148.
    Arguments against essentialism in biology rely strongly on a claim that modern biology abandoned Aristotle's notion of a species as a class of necessary and sufficient properties. However, neither his theory of essentialism, nor his logical definition of species and genus (eidos and genos) play much of a role in biological research and taxonomy, including his own. The objections to natural kinds thinking by early twentieth century biologists wrestling with the new genetics overlooked the fact that species have typical developmental (...)
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  47. Selection Without Replicators: The Origin of Genes, and the Replicator/Interactor Distinction in Etiobiology.John S. Wilkins, Ian Musgrave & Clem Stanyon - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):215-239.
    Genes are thought to have evolved from long-lived and multiply-interactive molecules in the early stages of the origins of life. However, at that stage there were no replicators, and the distinction between interactors and replicators did not yet apply. Nevertheless, the process of evolution that proceeded from initial autocatalytic hypercycles to full organisms was a Darwinian process of selection of favourable variants. We distinguish therefore between Neo-Darwinian evolution and the related Weismannian and Central Dogma divisions, on the one hand, and (...)
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  48. How to Teach Special Relativity.John S. Bell - 1976 - Progress in Scientific Culture 1.
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  49. Legitimacy and Economy in Deliberative Democracy.John S. Dryzek - 2001 - Political Theory 29 (5):651-669.
  50.  5
    Principles of Economics.John S. Mackenzie - 1891 - International Journal of Ethics 1 (4):505-507.
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