Results for 'John S. Burd'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  8
    Intelligence in the Modern World. John Dewey's Philosophy.H. W. S. & Joseph Ratner - 1939 - Journal of Philosophy 36 (21):585.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  2.  21
    Ethics and Epistemology in John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding. [REVIEW]P. L. S. - 1937 - Journal of Philosophy 34 (24):666-667.
  3. On Life's Threshold: Talks to Young People on Character and Conduct, Tr. By E. St. John.Charles Wagner & Edna St John - 1905
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  7
    Leaders on Ladders: The Power of Story in John’s Gospel.Amy L. Crider - 2018 - Perichoresis 16 (3):17-28.
    In his Gospel, John reveals this key leadership principle: effective leaders harness the power of narrative to illuminate the metanarrative and connect people to it. John uses narrative techniques to make invisible spiritual realities visible and thus succeeds in connecting people to the metanarrative. John forges a link between people and the metanarrative by showing individuals how their own stories fit into the biblical metanarrative, fulfilling his purpose: ‘These are written that you may believe…’. The church is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. "John Wesley's Non-Literal Literalism and Hermeneutics of Love".Rem B. Edwards - 2016 - Wesleyan Theological Journal 51 (2):26-40.
    A thorough examination of John Wesley’s writings will show that he was not a biblical literalist or infallibilist, despite his own occasional suggestions to the contrary. His most important principles for interpreting the Bible were: We should take its words literally only if doing so is not absurd, in which case we should “look for a looser meaning;” and “No Scripture can mean that God is not love, or that his mercy is not over all his works.” Eleven instances (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Mbiti, John S., African Religions and Philosophy [Book Review].E. E. Evans-Pritchard - 1969
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  7
    The Philosopher-Lobbyist: John Dewey and the People’s Lobby, 1928–1940, Written by Mordecai Lee. [REVIEW]Nick C. Sagos - 2017 - Contemporary Pragmatism 14 (4):529-532.
  8.  20
    Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism: A Study of Peirce's Relation to John Duns Scotus.Timothy C. Potts & John F. Boler - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (61):361.
  9. Charles Peirce and Scholastic Realism a Study of Peirce's Relation to John Duns Scotus.John F. Boler - 1963 - University of Washington Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  2
    What Today's Methodists Need to Know About John Wesley.Rem B. Edwards - 2018 - Lexington, KY: Emeth Press.
    John Wesley was an incredible person both in what he did and what he thought. Viewed against the background of the Christian scholars of his day and those who went before him, his thinking was immensely creative, insightful, and at times downright radical. From this book readers will learn more about what he thought than about what he did, but both are explored. Most Methodists know a little bit about what he did, but almost nothing about what he thought. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  27
    Utilitarianism (by John Stuart Mill): With Related Remarks From Mill’s Other Writings.Ben Eggleston (ed.) - 2017 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    This edition of _Utilitarianism_ supplements the text of Mill’s classic essay with 58 related remarks carefully selected from Mill’s other writings, ranging from his treatise on logic to his personal correspondence. In these remarks, Mill comments on specific passages of _Utilitarianism_, elaborates on topics he handles briefly in _Utilitarianism_, and discusses additional aspects of his moral thought. Short introductory comments accompany the related remarks, and an editor’s introduction provides an overview of _Utilitarianism_ crafted specifically to enhance accessibility for first-time readers (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. John Stuart Mill's "the Subjection of Women" His Contemporary and Modern Critics.Lesley A. Jacobs, Richard Vandewetering & John Stuart Mill - 1999
  13. I Am John's Brain.Andy Clark - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (2):144-8.
    I am John's[3] brain. In the flesh, I am just a rather undistinguished looking grey/white mass of cells. My surface is heavily convoluted and I am possessed of a fairly differentiated internal structure. John and I are on rather close and intimate terms; indeed, sometimes it is hard to tell us apart. But at times, John takes this intimacy a little too far. When that happens, he gets very confused about my role and functioning. He imagines that (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  9
    Discursive Investigation Into John’s Internalised Spirit Identity and its Implication.Zorodzai Dube - 2016 - Hts Theological Studies 72 (1):01-05.
    What does it mean to live in a society where everything good is located within one ethnicity, and geography? In reading the gospel of John, one gets the impression that faithful disciples, the Holy Spirit and morality are exclusively located within the Johannine community and can only permeate to the outside through the good work of the insiders - the disciples. Everything is asymmetric - morality, ideal disciples and good virtues - these originate from within John's community. Outside (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  27
    Introduction to 'John Searle's Philosophy of Language'.Savas L. Tsohatzidis - 2007 - In John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    -/- This volume presents eleven original essays that critically examine aspects of John Searle's seminal contributions to the philosophy of language, and explore new ways in which some of their themes could be developed. After an opening essay by Searle in which he summarizes the essentials of his conception of language and what he currently takes its most distinctive implications to be, the critical essays are grouped into two interconnected parts – “From mind to meaning” and “From meaning to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  7
    Chapter 5. John’s Call From the Wilderness for a Better Guidance of the Way to the Lord.Gitte Buch-Hansen - 2010 - In "It is the Spirit That Gives Life": A Stoic Understanding of Pneuma in John's Gospel. De Gruyter.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  4
    Augustine and John’s Gospel From Conversion to Confessiones.Michael Cameron - 2017 - Augustinian Studies 48 (1):263-278.
    How did John’s Gospel draw and compel Augustine before and during the composition of Confessiones? Analyzing references to John in Augustine’s works from his embrace of Nicene Christianity to the writing of Confessiones, this paper finds a growing emphasis on the importance of Christ’s humanity. Augustine strategically invokes two texts in Confessiones’ crucial seventh book: John 1:14, “the Word was made flesh,” and John 14:6, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.” This paper considers (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  4
    The St. John's Program: A Report. [REVIEW]C. W. - 1955 - Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):165-165.
    A description and critical estimate, by faculty and alumni, of the famous St. John's New Program in the liberal arts, covering the first 17 years of its operation.--W. C.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Introduction to the Theological Summa of St. Thomas by John S. Zybura.Martin Grabmann & John S. Zybura - 1930 - B. Herder Book Co.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. John Clarke of Hull's Argument for Psychological Egoism.John J. Tilley - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):69-89.
    John Clarke of Hull, one of the eighteenth century's staunchest proponents of psychological egoism, defended that theory in his Foundation of Morality in Theory and Practice. He did so mainly by opposing the objections to egoism in the first two editions of Francis Hutcheson's Inquiry into Virtue. But Clarke also produced a challenging, direct argument for egoism which, regrettably, has received virtually no scholarly attention. In this paper I give it some of the attention it merits. In addition to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  49
    John S. Wilkins and Malte C. Ebach: The Nature of Classification: Relationships and Kinds in the Natural Sciences.Catherine Kendig - 2015 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 37 (4):477-479.
    John Wilkins and Malte Ebach respond to the dismissal of classification as something we need not concern ourselves with because it is, as Ernest Rutherford suggested, mere ‘‘stamp collecting.’’ They contend that classification is neither derivative of explanation or of hypothesis-making but is necessarily prior and prerequisite to it. Classification comes first and causal explanations are dependent upon it. As such it is an important (but neglected) area of philosophical study. Wilkins and Ebach reject Norwood Russell Hanson’s thesis that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  51
    An Analysis of Properties in John Heil’s "From an Ontological Point of View".Sharon R. Ford - 2007 - In Giacomo Romano (ed.), Symposium on: John Heil, From an Ontological Point of View. Bari: Swif. pp. 45-51.
    In this paper I argue that the requirement for the qualitative is theory-dependent, determined by the fundamental assumptions built into the ontology. John Heil’s qualitative, in its role as individuator of objects and powers, is required only by a theory that posits a world of distinct objects or powers. Does Heil’s ‘deep’ view of the world, such that there is only one powerful object require the qualitative as individuator of objects and powers? The answer depends on whether it is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  59
    The Politics of Yhwh: John Howard Yoder's Old Testament Narration and its Implications for Social Ethics.John C. Nugent - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):71-99.
    The apparent tension between the moral codes of the Old and New Testaments constitutes a perennial problem for Christian ethics. Scholars who have taken this problem seriously have often done so in ways that presume sharp discontinuity between the Testaments. They then proceed to devise a system for identifying what is or is not relevant today, or what pertains to this or that particular social sphere. John Howard Yoder brings fresh perspectives to this perennial problem by refuting the presumption (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. John Dewey’s Logic of Science.Matthew J. Brown - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (2):258-306.
    In recent years, pragmatism in general and John Dewey in particular have been of increasing interest to philosophers of science. Dewey's work provides an interesting alternative package of views to those which derive from the logical empiricists and their critics, on problems of both traditional and more recent vintage. Dewey's work ought to be of special interest to recent philosophers of science committed to the program of analyzing ``science in practice.'' The core of Dewey's philosophy of science is his (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  25.  14
    The Virtue of Emerson's Imitation of Christ: From William Ellery Channing to John Brown.Emily J. Dumler‐Winckler - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (3):510-538.
    Christians have traditionally conceived of the moral life as an imitation of Christ, whereby followers enter into fellowship with God. The American Transcendentalists can be understood as extending rather than dispensing with this legacy. For Emerson, a person cultivates virtues by imitating those she loves and admires. Ultimately, however, the virtues enable her to innovate on received models, to excel by pressing beyond exemplars. Emerson's famous line, “imitation is suicide,” is not a contradiction but a fulfillment of the imitation of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word.Scott M. Williams - 2010 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Can Modus Vivendi Save Liberalism From Moralism? A Critical Assessment of John Gray's Political Realism.Rossi Enzo - forthcoming - In John Horton, Manon Westphal & Ulrich Willems (eds.), The Political Theory of Modus Vivendi. Dordrecht: Springer.
    I argue that John Gray's modus vivendi-based justification for liberalism is preferable to the more orthodox deontological or teleological justificatory strategies, at least because of the way it can deal with the problem of diversity. But then I show how that is not good news for liberalism, for grounding liberal political authority in a modus vivendi undermines liberalism’s aspiration to occupy a privileged normative position vis-à-vis other kinds of regimes. So modus vivendi can save liberalism from moralism, but at (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  64
    John Dewey's Pragmatist Alternative to the Belief-Acceptance Dichotomy.Matthew J. Brown - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 53:62-70.
    Defenders of value-free science appeal to cognitive attitudes as part of a wedge strategy, to mark a distinction between science proper and the uses of science for decision-making, policy, etc. Distinctions between attitudes like belief and acceptance have played an important role in defending the value-free ideal. In this paper, I will explore John Dewey's pragmatist philosophy of science as an alternative to the philosophical framework the wedge strategy rests on. Dewey does draw significant and useful distinctions between different (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. John Bishop's Leaps of Faith: Doxastic Ventures and the Logical Equivalence of Religious Faith and Agnosticism.James Beach - 2014 - Religious Studies 50 (1):101-117.
    In recent essays John Bishop proposes a model of religious faith. This author notices that a so-called doxastic venture model of theistic faith is self-defeating for the following reason: a venture suggests a process with an outcome; by definition a venture into Christian faith denies itself an outcome in virtue of the transcendent character of its claims – for what is claimed cannot be settled. Taking instruction from logical positivism, I stress the nonsensical character of religious claims while attacking (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Listen Libertarians!: A Review of John Tomasi's Free Market Fairness. [REVIEW]David Ellerman - forthcoming - Journal of Economic Issues.
    John Tomasi's new book, Free Market Fairness, has been well-received as "one of the very best philosophical treatments of libertarian thought, ever" and as a "long and friendly conversation between Friedrich Hayek and John Rawls—a conversation which, astonishingly, reaches agreement". The book does present an authoritative state-of-the-debate across the spectrum from right-libertarianism on the one side to high liberalism on the other side. My point is not to question where Tomasi comes down with his own version of "market (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  23
    John Dewey’s Theory of Growth and the Ontological View of Society.Jerome A. Popp - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (1):45-62.
    John Dewey’s famous early twentieth-century account of the relationship between education as growth and democratic societies, presented in Democracy and Education, was later rejected by him, because it failed to properly identify the role of societal structures in growth and experience. In the later Ethics, Dewey attempts to correct that omission, and adumbrates the argument required to reconstruct his theory, which is an appeal to the role of institutions in individual growth and experience. It is the contention of this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. On Visual Experience of Objects: Comments on John Campbell's Reference and Consciousness.Mohan Matthen - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 127 (2):195-220.
    John Campbell argues that visual attention to objects is the means by which we can refer to objects, and that this is so because conscious visual attention enables us to retrieve information about a location. It is argued here that while Campbell is right to think that we visually attend to objects, he does not give us sufficient ground for thinking that consciousness is involved, and is wrong to assign an intermediary role to location. Campbell’s view on sortals is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  39
    John Rawls’s Theory of Justice and Large-Scale Land Acquisitions: A Law and Economics Analysis of Institutional Background Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa. [REVIEW]Luis Tomás Montilla Fernández & Johannes Schwarze - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1223-1240.
    During the 2007–2008 global food crisis, the prices of primary foods, in particular, peaked. Subsequently, governments concerned about food security and investors keen to capitalize on profit-maximizing opportunities undertook large-scale land acquisitions (LASLA) in, predominantly, least developed countries (LDCs). Economically speaking, this market reaction is highly welcome, as it should (1) improve food security and lower prices through more efficient food production while (2) host countries benefit from development opportunities. However, our assessment of the debate on the issues indicates critical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. A Centennial Retrospective of John Dewey's "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy".Matthew J. Brown - manuscript
    n 1909, the 50th anniversary of both the publication of Origin of the Species and his own birth, John Dewey published "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy." This optimistic essay saw Darwin's advance not only as one of empirical or theoretical biology, but a logical and conceptual revolution that would shake every corner of philosophy. Dewey tells us less about the influence that Darwin exerted over philosophy over the past 50 years and instead prophesied the influence it would take (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  95
    Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW]Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the lowest possible level (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  40
    A Woman's Influence? John Locke and Damaris Masham on Moral Accountability.Jacqueline Broad - 2006 - Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (3):489-510.
    Some scholars suggest that John Locke’s revisions to the chapter “Of Power” for the 1694 second edition of his Essay concerning Human Understanding may be indebted to the Cambridge Platonist, Ralph Cudworth. Their claims rest on evidence that Locke may have had access to Cudworth’s unpublished manuscript treatises on free will. In this paper, I examine an alternative suggestion – the claim that Cudworth’s daughter, Damaris Cudworth Masham, and not Cudworth himself, may have exerted an influence on Locke’s revisions. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  32
    An Engaged Buddhist Response to John Rawls's "The Law of Peoples".Sallie B. King - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (4):637 - 661.
    In "The Law of Peoples", John Rawls proposes a set of principles for international relations, his "Law of Peoples." He calls this Law a "realistic utopia," and invites consideration of this Law from the perspectives of non-Western cultures. This paper considers Rawls's Law from the perspective of Engaged Buddhism, the contemporary form of socially and politically activist Buddhism. We find that Engaged Buddhists would be largely in sympathy with Rawls's proposals. There are differences, however: Rawls builds his view from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  30
    The Scientific Allegory of John Augustine Zahm: Zahm's Theological Method with Insight From Marie‐Joseph Lagrange.Hans Moscicke - 2016 - Zygon 51 (4):925-948.
    Catholic modernist John Augustine Zahm is best known for his attempt to reconcile the theory of evolution with the Christian scriptures. However, Zahm's theological method—the underlying principles and procedures in his effort to reconcile faith and science—remains largely unexamined. In this article, I analyze Zahm's theological method and submit that it is an attempt to harmonize scientific knowledge and Christian scripture through a “scientific allegory” of the bible, which takes into account the human and divine meanings of scripture, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  52
    John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Persuasion.Helen Ruth McCabe - 2014 - Informal Logic 34 (1):38-61.
    In his youth, John Stuart Mill followed his father’s philosophy of persuasion but, in 1830, Mill adopted a new philosophy of persuasion, trying to lead people incrementally towards the truth from their original stand-points rather than engage them antagonistically. Understanding this change helps us understand apparent contradictions in Mill’s cannon, as he disguises some of his more radical ideas in order to bring his audience to re-assess and authentically change their opinions. It also suggests a way of re-assessing the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  21
    Why Not One More Imponderable? John William Draper's Tithonic Rays.Klaus Hentschel - 2002 - Foundations of Chemistry 4 (1):5-59.
    This paper reconstructs what may have led the American professorof chemistry andnatural philosophy John William Draper to introduce a new kind ofradiation, whichhe dubbed `Tithonic rays''. After presenting his and earlierempirical findings onthe chemical action of light in Section 3, I analyze his pertinentpapers in Section 4with the aim of identifying the various types of argumentshe raised infavor of this new actinic entity (or more precisely, this newnatural kind of raybesides optical, thermal and perhaps also phosphorogenic rays).From a modernperspective, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  20
    On John Rawls's a Brief Inquiry Into the Meaning of Sin and Faith.Paul Weithman - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):557-582.
    ABSTRACTThis essay challenges the view that John Rawls's recently published undergraduate thesis A Brief Inquiry into the Meaning of Sin and Faith provides little help in understanding his mature work. Two crucial strands of Rawls's Theory of Justice are its critique of teleology and its claims about our moral nature and its expression. These strands are brought together in a set of arguments late in Theory which are important but have attracted little sustained attention. I argue that the target (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  56
    Two Project Methods: Preliminary Observations on the Similarities and Differences Between William Heard Kilpatrick’s Project Method and John Dewey’s Problem-Solving Method.Ari Sutinen - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (10):1040-1053.
    The project method became a famous teaching method whenWilliam Heard Kilpatrick published his article ‘Project Method’ in 1918. The key idea in Kilpatrick’s project method is to try to explain how pupils learn things when they work in projects toward different common objects.The same idea of pupils learning by work or action in an environment with objects also belongs to John Dewey’s problem-solving method. Are Kilpatrick’s project method and Dewey’s problemsolving method the same thing? The aim of this article (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  35
    John Venn's Hypothetical Infinite Frequentism and Logic.Lukas M. Verburgt - 2014 - History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (3):248-271.
    The goal of this paper is to provide a detailed reading of John Venn's Logic of Chance as a work of logic or, more specifically, as a specific portion of the general system of so-called ‘material’ logic developed in his Principles of Empirical or Inductive Logic and to discuss it against the background of his Boolean-inspired views on the connection between logic and mathematics. It is by means of this situating of Venn 1866 [The Logic of Chance. An Essay (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  35
    A Pilgrimage Through John Martin Fischer’s Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value.Hannah Tierney - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (1):179-196.
    John Martin Fischer’s most recent collection of essays, Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value, is both incredibly wide-ranging and impressively detailed. Fischer manages to cover a staggering amount of ground in the free will debate, while also providing insightful and articulate analyses of many of the positions defended in the field. In this collection, Fischer focuses on the relationship between free will and moral responsibility. In the first section of his book, Fischer defends Frankfurt cases as an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  23
    Review of John Hare, God's Call. [REVIEW]Thomas Williams - 2002 - The Thomist 66:477-481.
  46.  26
    John Dalton’s Puzzles: From Meteorology to Chemistry.Karen R. Zwier - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):58-66.
    Historical research on John Dalton has been dominated by an attempt to reconstruct the origins of his so-called "chemical atomic theory". I show that Dalton's theory is difficult to define in any concise manner, and that there has been no consensus as to its unique content among his contemporaries, later chemists, and modern historians. I propose an approach which, instead of attempting to work backward from Dalton's theory, works forward, by identifying the research questions that Dalton posed to himself (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  17
    John Dewey's Conception of Application of Law in its Philosophical and Social Context.Bojan Spaic - 2008 - Filozofija I Društvo 19 (2):221-249.
    John Dewey, one of the most important thinkers of pragmatism, elaborated a specific conception of law partially and gradually in the long course of his intellectual career. This part of his broader philosophical outlook is analyzed here through one of its most important segments - application of law - and interpreted in its historical, social and cultural background. The first part of the article concentrates on the 'objective' reasons for giving emphasis to the application of law in his legal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  12
    John Macmurray's Philosophy of the Personal and the Irreducibility of Psychological Persons.Jeff Sugarman - 2006 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 26 (1-2):172-188.
    John Macmurray's philosophy of "the form of the personal" is examined with particular interest in his emphasis on persons as agents, his account of psychological development, his claim that our self-awareness as persons is acquired from the mutuality of personal relations, and his important contribution in placing personhood at the center of inquiries into the human condition. Subsequently, it is argued that the reality of psychologically capable personhood so construed is irreducible to physical, biological, or social categories frequently deemed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  41
    A Defense of John Stuart Mill's Proof of the Principle of Utility.Necip Fikri Alican - 1994 - Dissertation, Washington University in St. Louis
    In my dissertation, I analyze, interpret, and defend John Stuart Mill's proof of the principle of utility in the fourth chapter of his Utilitarianism. My purpose is not to glorify utilitarianism, in a full sweep, as the best normative ethical theory, or even to vindicate, on a more specific level, Mill's universalistic ethical hedonism as the best form of utilitarianism. I am concerned only with Mill's utilitarianism, and primarily with his proof of the principle of utility. My overarching purpose (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  53
    Mill's Principle of Utility: A Defense of John Stuart Mill's Notorious Proof.Necip Fikri Alican - 1994 - Atlanta: Brill | Rodopi.
    This is a defense of John Stuart Mill’s proof of the principle of utility in the fourth chapter of his Utilitarianism. The proof is notorious as a fallacious attempt by a prominent philosopher, who ought not to have made the elementary mistakes he is supposed to have made. This book shows that he did not. The aim is not to glorify utilitarianism, in a full sweep, as the best normative ethical theory, or even to vindicate, on a more specific (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000