21 found
Order:
Disambiguations
John W. M. Krummel [21]John W. M. Krummel [1]
See also
John Krummel
Hobart and William Smith Colleges
  1. Thinking in Transition: Nishida Kitaro and Martin Heidegger.Elmar Weinmayr, tr Krummel, John W. M. & Douglas Ltr Berger - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):232-256.
    : Two major philosophers of the twentieth century, the German existential phenomenologist Martin Heidegger and the seminal Japanese Kyoto School philosopher Nishida Kitarō are examined here in an attempt to discern to what extent their ideas may converge. Both are viewed as expressing, each through the lens of his own tradition, a world in transition with the rise of modernity in the West and its subsequent globalization. The popularity of Heidegger's thought among Japanese philosophers, despite its own admitted limitation to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  77
    The Originary Wherein: Heidegger and Nishida on the Sacred and the Religious.John W. M. Krummel - 2010 - Research in Phenomenology 40 (3):378-407.
    In this paper, I explore a possible convergence between two great twentieth century thinkers, Nishida Kitarō of Japan and Martin Heidegger of Germany. The focus is on the quasi-religious language they employ in discussing the grounding of human existence in terms of an encompassing Wherein for our being. Heidegger speaks of “the sacred” and “the passing of the last god” that mark an empty clearing wherein all metaphysical absolutes or gods have withdrawn but are simultaneously indicative of an opening wherein (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3.  25
    On Nothing: Heidegger and Nishida.John W. M. Krummel - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (2):239-268.
    Two major twentieth century philosophers, of East and West, for whom the nothing is a significant concept are Nishida Kitarō and Martin Heidegger. Nishida’s basic concept is the absolute nothing upon which the being of all is predicated. Heidegger, on the other hand, thematizes the nothing as the ulterior aspect of being. Both are responding to Western metaphysics that tends to substantialize being and dichotomize the real. Ironically, however, while Nishida regarded Heidegger as still trapped within the confines of Western (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. The Unsolved Issue of ConsciousnessThe Unsolved Issue of Consciousness.Nishida Kitarō & John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1).
    The following essay, “The Unsolved Issue of Consciousness” (Torinokosaretaru ishiki no mondai 取残されたる意識の問題), by Nishida Kitarō 西田幾多郎 from 1927 is significant in regard to the development of what has come to be called “Nishida philosophy” (Nishida tetsugaku 西田哲学). In what follows, in addition to providing some commentary on the important points of his essay, I would like to show its relevance or significance not only for those who would like to study Nishida’s thought but also for philosophy in general, especially (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Transcendent or Immanent? Significance and History of Li in Confucianism.John W. M. Krummel - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):417-437.
    This paper investigates the meaning of the neo-Confucian concept of 'li'. From early on, it has the sense of a pattern designating how things are and ought to be. But it takes on the appearance of something transcendent to the world only at a certain point in history, when it becomes juxtaposed to 'qi'. Zhu Xi has been criticized for this 'li-qi' dichotomization and the transcendentalization of 'li'. The paper re-examines this putative dualism and transcendentalism, looking into both Zhu's discussions (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  43
    Representation and Poiesis: The Imagination in the Later Heidegger.John W. M. Krummel - 2007 - Philosophy Today 51 (3):261-277.
    I examine the role of the imagination (Einbildung) for Martin Heidegger after his Kant-reading of 1929. In 1929 he broadens the imagination to the openness of Dasein. But after 1930 Heidegger either disparages it as a representational faculty belonging to modernity; or further develops and clarifies its ontological broadening as the clearing or poiesis. If the hylo-morphic duality implied by Kantian imagination requires a prior unity, that underlying power unfolding beings in aletheic formations (poiesis) of being (the happening of being, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  22
    Myth.Miki Kiyoshi & John W. M. Krummel - 2016 - Social Imaginaries 2 (1):25-69.
    “Myth” comprises the first chapter of the book, The Logic of the Imagination, by Miki Kiyoshi.In this chapter Miki analyzes the significance of myth as possessing a certain reality despite being “fictions.” He begins by broadening the meaning of the imagination to argue for a logic of the imagination that involves expressive action or poiesis in general, of which myth is one important product. The imagination gathers in myth material from the environing world lived by the social collectivity. Its formation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  40
    Emptiness and Experience: Pure and Impure.John W. M. Krummel - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):57-76.
    This paper discusses the idea of "pure experience" within the context of the Buddhist tradition and in connection with the notions of emptiness and dependent origination via a reading of Dale Wright's reading of 'Huangbo' in his 'Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism'. The purpose is to appropriate Wright's text in order to engender a response to Steven Katz's contextualist-constructivist thesis that there are no "pure" (i.e., unmediated) experiences. In light of the Mahayana claim that everything is empty of substance, i.e., (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  55
    The Unsolved Issue of Consciousness.Nishida Kitarō & John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):44-51.
    This essay by Nishida Kitarō from 1927, translated into English here for the first time, is from the initial period of what has come to be called “Nishida philosophy” (Nishida tetsugaku), when Nishida was first developing his conception of “place” (basho). Nishida here inquires into the relationship between logic and consciousness in terms of place and implacement in order to overcome the shortcomings of previous philosophical attempts—from the ancient Greeks to the moderns—to dualistically conceive the relationship between being and knowing (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  28
    Kūkai's Shingon: Embodiment of Emptiness.John W. M. Krummel - forthcoming - In Bret W. Davis (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter explicates the philosophy of the body of sixth-century Buddhist thinker Kūkai. Kūkai brings together what initially seem to be opposing concepts: body and emptiness. He does this in the context of formulating a system of cosmology inseparable from religious practice. We interact with the rest of the cosmos through our body. Kūkai characterizes the cosmos in turn as the body of the Buddha, who personifies the embodiment of the dharma. This cosmic body is comprised of myriad bodies through (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  15
    Chōra in Heidegger and Nishida.John W. M. Krummel - 2016 - Studia Phaenomenologica 16:489-518.
    In this article I discuss how the Greek concept of chōra inspired both Martin Heidegger and Nishida Kitarō. Not only was Plato’s concept an important source, but we can also draw connections to the pre-Platonic understanding of the term as well. I argue that chōra in general entails concretion-cum-indetermination, a space that implaces human existence into its environment and clears room for the presencing-absencing of beings. One aim is to convince Nishida scholars of the significance of chōra in Nishida’s thought (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  14
    Comparative Philosophy in Japan: Nakamura Hajime and Izutsu Toshihiko.John W. M. Krummel - forthcoming - In Bret W. Davis (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter discusses the comparative philosophies of two premier comparativists of postwar Japan, Nakamura Hajime and Izutsu Toshihiko. Both were known as accomplished scholars within their respective fields—Buddhist studies and Indology for Nakamura, and Islamic studies for Izutsu—when they initiated their comparative projects. Each had a distinct vision of what comparison entails and the sort of philosophy it would produce. Nakamura’s project was a world history of ideas that uncovers basic patterns in the unfolding of human thought. Izutsu aims to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  15
    Praxis of the Middle.John W. M. Krummel - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (4):517-535.
    This paper considers the controversy surrounding the Buddhist doctrine of “no-self” (anattā, anātman), and especially the question of whether the Buddha himself meant by it unequivocally the ontological denial of the self. The emergence of this doctrine is connected with the Buddha’s attempt to forge a “middle way” that avoids the extreme views of “eternalism” in regards to the soul and “annihilationism” of the soul at bodily death. By looking at the earliest works of the Pāli canon, three of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  2
    The Shifting Other in Karatani Kōjin’s Philosophy.Toshiaki Kobayashi & John W. M. Krummel - 2016 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 4:17-31.
    In this article Kobayashi Toshiaki discusses the importance in all periods of Karatani’s oeuvre of the notion of an “exterior” that necessarily falls beyond the bounds of a system, together with the notion of “singularity” as that which cannot be contained within a “universal.” The existential dread vis-à-vis the uncanny other that Karatani in his early works of literary criticism had initially found to be the underlying tone in Sōseki’s works remained with Karatani himself throughout his career and is what (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  6
    Embodied Implacement in Kūkai and Nishida.John W. M. Krummel - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (3):786-808.
    Two Japanese philosophers not often read together but both with valuable insights concerning body and place are Kūkai 空海, the founder of Shingon 真言 Buddhism, and Nishida Kitarō 西田幾多郎, the founder of Kyoto School philosophy. This essay will examine the importance of embodied implacement in correlativity with the environment in the philosophies of these two preeminent intellects of Japan. One was a medieval religionist and the other a modern philosopher, and yet similarities inherited from Mahāyāna Buddhism are to be found (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  3
    Praxis of the Middle: Self and No-Self in Early Buddhism.John W. M. Krummel - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (4):517-535.
    This paper considers the controversy surrounding the Buddhist doctrine of “no-self”, and especially the question of whether the Buddha himself meant by it unequivocally the ontological denial of the self. The emergence of this doctrine is connected with the Buddha’s attempt to forge a “middle way” that avoids the extreme views of “eternalism” in regards to the soul and “annihilationism” of the soul at bodily death. By looking at the earliest works of the Pāli canon, three of the five Nikāyas (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  9
    Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations (Review). [REVIEW]John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (2):297-300.
    This is a book review of the book Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 2: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations edited by Victor Sōgen Hori and Melissa Anne-Marie Curley, published in 2008 by the Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture, Nagoya, Japan.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  2
    ‘The Logic of Place’ and Common Sense.Nakamura Yūjirō & John W. M. Krummel - 2015 - Social Imaginaries 1 (1):83-103.
    The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the College international de philosophie in Paris in 1983. In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  7
    Buddhist Responses to Globalization.Peter D. Hershock, Carolyn M. Jones Medine, Ugo Dessi, Melanie L. Harris, John W. M. Krummel & Erin McCarthy - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    This interdisciplinary collection of essays highlights the relevance of Buddhist doctrine and practice to issues of globalization. From philosophical, religious, historical, and political perspectives, the authors show that Buddhism—arguably the world’s first transnational religion—is a rich resource for navigating todays interconnected world.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Contemporary Japanese Philosophy: A Reader.John W. M. Krummel (ed.) - forthcoming - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Contemporary Japanese Philosophy is an anthology of post-war Japanese philosophy showcasing a range of philosophers and philosophical trends from 1945 to the present. This important volume introduces the reader to a variety schools of thought. Ideal for classroom use, this is the ultimate resource for students and teachers of Japanese philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  12
    Nishida Kitarō's Chiasmatic Chorology: Place of Dialectic, Dialectic of Place.John W. M. Krummel - 2015 - Indiana University Press.
    Nishida Kitarō is considered Japan's first and greatest modern philosopher. As founder of the Kyoto School, he began a rigorous philosophical engagement and dialogue with Western philosophical traditions, especially the work of G. W. F. Hegel. John W. M. Krummel explores the Buddhist roots of Nishida’s thought and places him in connection with Hegel and other philosophers of the Continental tradition. Krummel develops notions of self-awareness, will, being, place, the environment, religion, and politics in Nishida’s thought and shows how his (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography