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  1.  4
    Social learning is central to innovation, in primates and beyond.Corina J. Logan & John W. Pepper - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):416-417.
    Much of the importance of innovation stems from its capacity to spread via social learning, affecting multiple individuals, thus generating evolutionary and ecological consequences. We advocate a broader taxonomic focus in the field of behavioral innovation, as well as the use of comparative field research, and discuss the unique conservation implications of animal innovations and traditions.
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    Considering cooperation: Empiricism as a foundation for unifying the behavioral sciences.John W. Pepper - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):38-39.
    Economics and evolutionary biology share a long history of interaction and parallel development. This pattern persists with regard to how the two fields address the issues of selfishness and cooperation. The recent renewed emphasis on empiricism in both fields provides a solid foundation on which to build a truly scientific unification of the behavioral sciences. (Published Online April 27 2007).
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    Selection without multiple replicators?John W. Pepper & Thorbjørn Knudsen - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):550-551.
    Hull et al.'s construction of operant learning as an instance of selection gives rise to problems that weaken this application of selection theory beyond acceptable limits. We point out that most fundamental is a disregard for the need to include multiple concurrent replicators in any definition of selection and indicate how this problem may be solved.
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